Articles related to animal telemetry

Description

Animal telemetry

latest article added on September 2014

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Niche overlap between marsupial and eutherian carnivores: does competition threaten the endangered spotted-tailed quoll?Glen, A. S.2008

Niche overlap between marsupial and eutherian carnivores: does competition threaten the endangered spotted-tailed quoll?

Keywords

Canis lupus,community structure,Dasyurus maculatus,exploitation,Felis catus,guild,interference,invasive animals,top-down regulation,Vulpes vulpes,animal telemetry

Abstract

  1. The significance of top-down regulation by carnivores is receiving increasing global recognition. As a consequence, key objectives in many programmes that seek to maintain ecosystem function now include conserving carnivores and understanding their interactions. This study examined overlap in resource use (space and diet) of introduced eutherian carnivores and an endangered marsupial carnivore, the spotted-tailed quoll Dasyurus maculatus, in eastern Australia. We also investigated mechanisms of niche partitioning and evidence for interspecific aggression.
  2. Dietary overlap between quolls, red foxes Vulpes vulpes and wild dogs Canis lupus ssp. was assessed by analysis of scats. Trapping, radio-tracking and direct observations were used to quantify spatial overlap between quolls, foxes, wild dogs and feral cats Felis catus.
  3. Dietary overlap among the carnivores was extensive. Medium-sized mammals were the most important prey for all three predators, indicating potential for exploitative interactions. However, hunting of different size classes of secondary prey and consumption by quolls of more arboreal prey than their counterparts may assist coexistence. Remains of quoll were found in two dog scats, and cat hair in another, possibly indicating intraguild predation.
  4. We observed extensive spatial overlap between quolls and eutherian carnivores. However, we inferred from dietary data that quolls foraged primarily in forested habitat, while canids foraged mainly in cleared habitat.
  5. Synthesis and applications. Our results indicate strong potential for competition between spotted-tailed quolls and eutherian carnivores, and thus a situation where control of introduced predators may be desirable, not only for the conservation of prey species but also for the protection of native carnivores. Concern over potential non-target mortality of quolls has hindered efforts to control foxes in eastern Australia using poison baits. We contend that, rather than harming quoll populations, baiting for foxes should aid the conservation of quolls and should be implemented in areas of sympatry where fox numbers are high.

Authors

Glen, A. S.,Dickman, C. R.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Applied Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1111/j.1365-2664.2007.01449.x

Longline Fisheries and Foraging Distribution of Flesh-Footed Shearwaters in Eastern Australia.THALMANN, SAM J.2009

Longline Fisheries and Foraging Distribution of Flesh-Footed Shearwaters in Eastern Australia.

Keywords

Australian Fishery Zone,flesh-footed shearwaters,geolocation,habitat utilization,longline fishery,uffinus carneipes,seabird bycatch, animal telemetry

Abstract

Incidental seabird mortality associated with bycatch during longline commercial fishing is a conservation concern. An initial step to estimating likelihood of seabird bycatch and conceiving conservation strategies is determining amount of overlap between foraging birds and commercial fishing effort, identifying oceanographic features associated with foraging birds, and quantifying dive characteristics. We tracked 24 adult flesh-footed shearwaters (Puffinus carneipes) breeding on Lord Howe Island located east of Australia during incubation and early and late chick-rearing periods from 6 January to 17 April 2005. At-sea foraging distribution of flesh-footed shearwaters was primarily confined within the jurisdictional Australian Fishing Zone. Foraging was strongly associated with sea-surface temperature >24° C. Spatial and temporal overlap of longline fishing with foraging shearwaters varied throughout the breeding season, but was greatest (63% overlap) during early chick-rearing. Mean maximum distance reached from the breeding colony during a foraging event was 804 km (SD = 280) from Lord Howe Island. Foraging behavior was strongly diurnal, with 91% of dives occurring during daylight, and most dives (77%) were <5 m. Given that longline fishing and flesh-footed shearwaters overlap substantially, the Australian Fisheries Management Authority should consider implementing additional regulations to further reduce bycatch. Conservation strategies such as setting longlines at nights may reduce flesh-footed shearwater bycatch.

Authors

THALMANN, SAM J., G. BARRY BAKER, MARK HINDELL and GEOFFREY N. TUCK.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2007-461

Effects of Tidal and Diel Cycles on Dugong Habitat Use.SHEPPARD, JAMES K.2009

Effects of Tidal and Diel Cycles on Dugong Habitat Use.

Keywords

dugong,grazer,habitat use,marine mammal,spatial behavior,telemetry,animal telemetry

Abstract

Quantifying the factors influencing behaviors of aquatic mammalian grazers may enhance the generic understanding of grazer ecology. We investigated diel and tidal patterns in movements of the dugong (Dugong dugon) by Global Positioning System-tracking 12 animals in 5 inshore-intertidal and 3 offshore-subtidal habitats along the coast of Queensland, Australia. We examined effects of tide height and time of day on the dugong's distance from 1) the nearest coast, 2) water >3 m deep, 3) actual water depth (bathymetry + tide ht) experienced, and 4) distribution of the directions of movements. Both tidal and diel cycles influenced dugong movement. Tracked dugongs tended to be closer to shore at high tide than at low tide and closer to shore at night than during the day. Onshore movement was more prevalent on incoming tides and in the afternoon and evening. Offshore movement was more prevalent on outgoing tides and from midnight through the morning until midday. Tidal and diel variation in water depths used by the inshore-intertidal dugongs was small, but probably underestimated, hidden by a sampling bias in the telemetry equipment. Onshore movement at high tide allowed dugongs to exploit intertidal seagrass beds. Dugongs are closer to shore in afternoons and evenings than in mornings. This behavior may be related to the avoidance of predators or watercraft. Our findings can be used to predict spatial patterns of dugongs within areas of conservation management significance and to assess, avoid, and mitigate adverse effects of anthropogenic disturbance.

Authors

SHEPPARD, JAMES K., RHONDDA E. JONES, HELENE MARSH and IVAN R. LAWLER.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2007-468

Feral Swine Behavior Relative to Aerial Gunning in Southern Texas.CAMPBELL, TYLER A.2010

Feral Swine Behavior Relative to Aerial Gunning in Southern Texas.

Keywords

aerial gunning;feral swine;Global Positioning System;helicopter;hog;home range;movement;pig;Sus scrofa;telemetry

Abstract

Feral swine (Sus scrofa) impact resources through their destructive feeding behavior, competition with native wildlife, and impacts to domestic animal agriculture. We studied aerial gunning on feral swine to determine if aerial gunning altered home range and core area sizes, distances between home range centroids, and distances moved by surviving individuals. We collected data before, during, and after aerial gunning in southern Texas. Using Global Positioning System collars deployed on 25 adult feral swine at 2 study sites, we found home range and core area sizes did not differ before and after aerial gunning. However, feral swine moved at a greater rate during the aerial gunning phase than during the before and after periods. We concluded that aerial gunning had only minor effects on the behavior of surviving swine and that this removal method should be considered a viable tool in contingency planning for a foreign animal disease outbreak.

Authors

CAMPBELL, TYLER A., DAVID B. LONG and BRUCE R. LELAND.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-131

Effects of Species Behavior on Global Positioning System Collar Fix Rates.MATTISSON, JENNY2010

Effects of Species Behavior on Global Positioning System Collar Fix Rates.

Keywords

activity pattern;behavior;fix rate;Global Positioning System;Gulo gulo;Lynx lynx

Abstract

Use of Global Positioning System (GPS) telemetry is increasing in wildlife studies and has provided researchers and managers with new insight into animal behavior. However, performance of GPS collars varies and a major concern is the cause of unsuccessful fixes. We examined possible factors causing missed fixes in GPS collars on sympatric free-ranging Eurasian lynx (Lynx lynx) and wolverines (Gulo gulo) in northern Sweden. We tested for effects of species, activity, habitat, individual, and collar on fix rate. Species was the most important factor affecting fix rate. Fix rate of GPS collars on lynx (80%) was almost twice as high as on wolverines (46%). Fix rate decreased during periods of low activity (day beds) for both species. Fix rate also decreased for females (both lynx and wolverine) for a period after they gave birth. We found no effect of proportion of forest within individual home range on fix rate. We conclude that species behavior, characteristics, and activity pattern are important factors affecting fix rate that we recommend be taken into consideration prior to analyzing GPS location data.

Authors

MATTISSON, JENNY, HENRIK ANDRÉN, JENS PERSSON and PETER SEGERSTRÖM.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-157

Test of Localized Management for Reducing Deer Browsing in Forest Regeneration Areas.MILLER, BRAD F.2010

Test of Localized Management for Reducing Deer Browsing in Forest Regeneration Areas.

Keywords

Appalachians;forest regeneration;herbivory;localized management;Odocoileus virginianus;rose-petal hypothesis;West Virginia;white-tailed deer

Abstract

White-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) browsing in forest regeneration sites can affect current and future stand structure and species composition. Removal of deer social units (localized management) has been proposed as a strategy to alleviate deer overbrowsing in forest systems. We conducted an experimental localized removal in a high-density deer population in the central Appalachians of West Virginia, USA, during winter 2002. We removed 51 deer within a 1.1-km2 area that encompassed 2 forest regeneration sites (14 ha). During the summer following removal, we detected decreases in distance from the removal area in 8 of 30 (26.7%) adult females having pretreatment mean telemetry locations 2 removal area. Home range shifts of adjacent deer coupled with the large number of animals collected in the second removal suggests that localized management only produces temporary voids within high-density deer herds. Localized management may not effectively reduce negative impacts of deer in areas of high deer density.

Authors

MILLER, BRAD F., TYLER A. CAMPBELL, BEN R. LASETER, W. MARK FORD and KARL V. MILLER.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-221

Comparative Performance of Three Brands of Lightweight Global Positioning System Collars.Blackie, Helen M.2010

Comparative Performance of Three Brands of Lightweight Global Positioning System Collars.

Keywords

brushtail possum,fix success,Global Positioning System (GPS) collar,HABIT,malfunction,performance,Sirtrack,Televilt,Trichosurus vulpecula,animal telemetry

Abstract

Recent miniaturization and weight reductions of Global Positioning System (GPS) collars have opened up deployment opportunities on a new array of terrestrial animal species, but the performance of lightweight (Trichosurus vulpecula), a nocturnal arboreal marsupial. I assessed performance of these collars in terms of technical malfunctions, fix-success rates, battery longevity, and aspects of location quality. Technical malfunctions occurred in >50% of HABIT and Televilt collars, whereas all Sirtrack collars operated normally. Fix-success rates for all brands were significantly higher during stationary tests than when deployed on brushtail possums. HABIT and Televilt brands functioned poorly in field conditions, with success rates of 16.2% and 2.1%, respectively. Sirtrack collars had the highest fix rate when deployed (64.8%). I modified several HABIT collars by changing the GPS antenna location, with a resultant substantial increase in field fix success (92.6%). Most collars ceased working before they reached 50% of their manufacturer-estimated life expectancy. Suboptimal placement of GPS antenna, combined with short satellite acquisition times and long fix intervals, were a likely cause of low fix-success rates and premature battery failures. Researchers wanting to employ lightweight GPS collars must be aware of current limitations and should carefully consider prospects of low fix rates and limited battery lives before deciding whether these units are capable of meeting study objectives.

Authors

Blackie, Helen M.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-412

Living on the Edge: Viability of Moose in Northeastern Minnesota.LENARZ, MARK S.2010

Living on the Edge: Viability of Moose in Northeastern Minnesota.

Keywords

Alces alces;fertility;growth rate;matrix model;Minnesota;moose population dynamics;species distribution;survival

Abstract

North temperate species on the southern edge of their distribution are especially at risk to climate-induced changes. One such species is the moose (Alces alces), whose continental United States distribution is restricted to northern states or northern portions of the Rocky Mountain cordillera. We used a series of matrix models to evaluate the demographic implications of estimated survival and reproduction schedules for a moose population in northeastern Minnesota, USA, between 2002 and 2008. We used data from a telemetry study to calculate adult survival rates and estimated calf survival and fertility of adult females by using results of helicopter surveys. Estimated age- and year-specific survival rates showed a sinusoidal temporal pattern during our study and were lower for younger and old-aged animals. Estimates of annual adult survival (when assumed to be constant for ages >1.7 yr old) ranged from 0.74 to 0.85. Annual calf survival averaged 0.40, and the annual ratio of calves born to radiocollared females averaged 0.78. Point estimates for the finite rate of increase (?) from yearly matrices ranged from 0.67 to 0.98 during our 6-year study, indicative of a long-term declining population. Assuming each matrix to be equally likely to occur in the future, we estimated a long-term stochastic growth rate of 0.85. Even if heat stress is not responsible for current levels of survival, continuation of this growth rate will ultimately result in a northward shift of the southern edge of moose distribution. Population growth rate, and its uncertainty, was most sensitive to changes in estimated adult survival rates. The relative importance of adult survival to population viability has important implications for harvest of large herbivores and the collection of information on wildlife fertility.

Authors

LENARZ, MARK S., JOHN FIEBERG, MICHAEL W. SCHRAGE and ANDREW J. EDWARDS.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-493

Activity pattern of Geoffroy’s cats (Leopardus geoffroyi) during a period of food shortage.Pereira, J.A2010

Activity pattern of Geoffroy’s cats (Leopardus geoffroyi) during a period of food shortage.

Keywords

Activity pattern ; Food shortage ; Geoffroy's cat ; Leopardus geoffroyi ; Monte eco-region

Abstract

The activity pattern of mammalian carnivores is influenced by several factors, including environmental conditions, interference from competitors, and behavioral thermoregulation. Facing extreme environmental conditions the activity rhythm of animals may change. The activity patterns of Geoffroy's cats (Leopardus geoffroyi) were studied during a period of prey scarcity in a scrubland area of central Argentina, based on five individuals radio-collared and monitored by radio-telemetry. Activity readings were recorded every 15 min during 6- to 24-h observation periods, and a total of 3121 fixes totaling 780.3 h of monitoring were gathered for these cats. Geoffroy's cats were significantly more active during daytime (58.1 +/- 9.4% of active fixes) than during the night (33.6 +/- 2.9%). Although they were active at any time of the day, an activity peak was recorded from 12.00 to 17.00 h. This pattern is opposite to those observed in other areas or even to that recorded for this species in the same area during a period of higher prey abundance. This apparent shift toward diurnal activity could be a response to a combination of ecological (prey availability, predators or competition avoidance) and physiological (energy saving) factors. Geoffroy's cats are behaviorally flexible, but this ability may not be enough to maintain survival (and population size) under harsh environmental conditions.

Authors

J.A Pereira

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Arid Environments

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.jaridenv.2010.03.017

Activity, range areas, and nesting patterns in the viscacha rat, Octomys mimax.Ebensperger, L.A.2008

Activity, range areas, and nesting patterns in the viscacha rat, Octomys mimax.

Keywords

Group-living ; Nesting site ; Octomys ; Range area ; Range overlap ; Space use

Abstract

Several rodent species engage in group living, meaning that individuals share nests, resting places, and range areas. Establishing how group living varies across species is critical for comparative studies to examine the origin and the adaptive value of this behavior. Comparative approaches are more powerful when a diverse array of taxonomic groups is included. We used telemetry techniques to monitor patterns of activity, resting places, and range areas at night to examine the extent of sociality of the scarcely known viscacha rats, Octomys mimax. Seven individuals were live trapped and fitted with radio-collars. Viscacha rat activity, as measured from distance moved between consecutive telemetry scans, took place mostly during the nighttime. During day, animals used from 2 to 6 putative nest places, but one was used more frequently. The sharing of resting locations by two or more radio-collared animals was never recorded. Viscacha rats showed relatively large range areas and low-to-moderate spatial overlap with neighbors. Male rats had larger range areas than females, but spatial overlap with neighbors was similar. Results suggest that viscacha rats are solitary living animals. This study supported a solitary-to-social trend from basal to more derivate forms across Octodontidae.

Authors

L.A. Ebensperger, R. Sobrero, V. Campos, S.M. Giannoni

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Arid Environments

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.jaridenv.2008.02.003

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