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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
The Sage Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianusBurnett, L. E.1905

The Sage Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Burnett, L. E.

Year Published

1905

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1361386

A comparison of sample types varying in invasiveness for use in DNA sex determination in an endangered population of greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus uropihasianus)Bush, KL2005

A comparison of sample types varying in invasiveness for use in DNA sex determination in an endangered population of greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus uropihasianus)

Keywords

DNA extraction, endangered species, noninvasive samples, Sage-Grouse, sex determination

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Bush, KL; Vinsky, MD; Aldridge, CL; Paszkowski, CA

Year Published

2005

Publication

Conservation Genetics

Locations
DOI

10.1007/s10592-005-9040-6

Population structure and genetic diversity of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in fragmented landscapes at the northern edge of their rangeBush, Krista L.2011

Population structure and genetic diversity of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in fragmented landscapes at the northern edge of their range

Keywords

Sage-grouse Genetic structure Decliningpopulation Genetic diversity Periphery

Abstract

Range-edge dynamics and anthropogenic fragmentation are expected to impact patterns of genetic diversity, and understanding the influence of both factors is important for effective conservation of threatened wildlife species. To examine these factors, we sampled greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) from a declining, fragmented region at the northern periphery of the species' range and from a stable, contiguous core region. We genotyped 2,519 individuals at 13 microsatellite loci from 104 leks in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Montana, and Wyoming. Birds from northern Montana, Alberta, and Saskatchewan were identified as a single population that exhibited significant isolation by distance, with the Milk River demarcating two subpopulations. Both subpopulations exhibited high genetic diversity with no evidence that peripheral regions were genetically depauperate or highly structured. However, river valleys and a large agricultural region were significant barriers to dispersal. Leks were also composed primarily of non-kin, rejecting the idea that leks form because of male kin association. Northern Montana sage-grouse are maintaining genetic connectivity in fragmented and northern peripheral habitats via dispersal through and around various forms of fragmentation.

Authors

Bush, Krista L.; Dyte, Christopher K.; Moynahan, Brendan J.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Sauls, Heather S.; Battazzo, Angela M.; Walker, Brett L.; Doherty, Kevin E.; Tack, Jason; Carlson, John; Eslinger, Dale; Nicholson, Joel; Boyce, Mark S.; Naugle, David E.; Paszkowski, Cynthia A.; Coltman, David W.

Year Published

2011

Publication

Conservation Genetics

Locations
DOI

10.1007/s10592-010-0159-8

A pressure-operated drop net for capturing Greater Sage-GrouseBush, Krista L.2008

A pressure-operated drop net for capturing Greater Sage-Grouse

Keywords

capture; drop net; greater Sage-Grouse; pressure operated; Sage-Grouse

Abstract

A pressure-operated drop net was developed to capture endangered Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Alberta, Canada. A drop net was developed because other capture methods, such as night lighting and walk-in traps, have largely been unsuccessful in Alberta, and rocket netting was too dangerous to be used with an endangered population. Nets (one black and one gray) were used to capture 13 birds (12 males and 1 female) in six attempts. Nets dropped quickly (about 1 s) and quietly and captured all birds under the net. More birds (N = 12) were captured using a gray net than a black net, probably because it was less conspicuous. The presence of a drop net on the lek did not alter the behavior of the birds at the lek or influence lek attendance. The cost of a net, including all supplies, tools, and equipment needed, was $790 US ($900 CAN). This pressure-operated drop net system should prove effective for capturing other lekking species and other ground-dwelling birds that will respond to baiting.

Authors

Bush, Krista L.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Field Ornithology

Locations
DOI

10.1111/j.1557-9263.2008.00146.x

BIRDS OF A FEATHER DO NOT ALWAYS LEK TOGETHER: GENETIC DIVERSITY AND KINSHIP STRUCTURE OF GREATER SAGE-GROUSE (CENTROCERCUS UROPHASIANUS) IN ALBERTABush, Krista L.2010

BIRDS OF A FEATHER DO NOT ALWAYS LEK TOGETHER: GENETIC DIVERSITY AND KINSHIP STRUCTURE OF GREATER SAGE-GROUSE (CENTROCERCUS UROPHASIANUS) IN ALBERTA

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, dispersal, genetic diversity, Greater Sage-Grouse, kin selection, population genetics, relatedness

Abstract

Acr Endangered species are sensitive to the genetic effects of fragmentation, small population size, and inbreeding, so effective management requires a thorough understanding of their breeding systems and genetic diversity. The Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a lekking species that has declined by 66-92% during the past 35 years in Alberta. Our goals were to assess the genetic diversity of Greater Sage-Grouse in Alberta and to determine the degree of sex-specific relatedness within and among leks. Six hundred and four individuals sampled in 1998-2007 were genotyped at 13 microsatellite loci. Levels of genetic diversity were high, with the exception of one recently founded lek, and did not change over time. Overall, we did not observe isolation-by-distance among leks, and most leks were not differentiated from one another, which suggests that gene flow occurs across the study area. Males and females exhibited similar patterns of isolation-by-distance, so dispersal was not sex-specific. Overall relatedness was close to zero for both sexes at the level of the province, lek, and year, which suggests that neither sex forms strong kin associations. However, we found relatedness within leks at the year level to be greater than zero, which indicates interannual variation. We also found no evidence that Greater Sage-Grouse follow the typical avian pattern of male philopatry. Although the species is endangered in Alberta and occurs in fragmented habitat, it has maintained genetic diversity and connectivity. Received 8 September 2008, accepted 22 September 2009.

Authors

Bush, Krista L.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Carpenter, Jennifer E.; Paszkowski, Cynthia A.; Boyce, Mark S.; Coltman, David W.

Year Published

2010

Publication

The Auk: Ornithological Advances

Locations
DOI

10.1525/auk.2009.09035

Wildlife habitats in managed rangelands - the Great Basin of southeastern Oregon. Sage grouse.Call, M.W.1985

Wildlife habitats in managed rangelands - the Great Basin of southeastern Oregon. Sage grouse.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Decreases in sage grouse followed the decrease in sagebrush. Other factors, such as unfavorable weather conditions at hatching time and increased predation, hunting, and disease have each been important at various times in localized areas but are probably not the most important factors in the overall downward trend.

Authors

Call, M.W.; Maser, C.

Year Published

1985

Publication

U S Forest Service

Locations
Sage-Grouse Habitat Selection During Winter in Alberta.Carpenter, Jennifer2010

Sage-Grouse Habitat Selection During Winter in Alberta.

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus;critical habitat;energy development;greater sage-grouse;resource selection functions;winter habitats

Abstract

Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are dependent on sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) for food and shelter during winter, yet few studies have assessed winter habitat selection, particularly at scales applicable to conservation planning. Small changes to availability of winter habitats have caused drastic reductions in some sage-grouse populations. We modeled winter habitat selection by sage-grouse in Alberta, Canada, by using a resource selection function. Our purpose was to 1) generate a robust winter habitat-selection model for Alberta sage-grouse; 2) spatially depict habitat suitability in a Geographic Information System to identify areas with a high probability of selection and thus, conservation importance; and 3) assess the relative influence of human development, including oil and gas wells, in landscape models of winter habitat selection. Terrain and vegetation characteristics, sagebrush cover, anthropogenic landscape features, and energy development were important in top Akaike's Information Criterion-selected models. During winter, sage-grouse selected dense sagebrush cover and homogenous less rugged areas, and avoided energy development and 2-track truck trails. Sage-grouse avoidance of energy development highlights the need for comprehensive management strategies that maintain suitable habitats across all seasons.

Authors

Carpenter, Jennifer, Cameron Aldridge and Mark S. Boyce.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-368

Parasites and Infectious Diseases of Greater Sage-Grouse.Christiansen, Thomas J.2011

Parasites and Infectious Diseases of Greater Sage-Grouse.

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, disease, greater sage-grouse, parasite, pathogen

Abstract

We report the parasites, infectious diseases, and noninfectious diseases related to toxicants found in Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) across its range. Documentation of population-level effects is rare, although researchers have responded to the recent emergence of West Nile virus with rigorous efforts. West Nile virus shows greater virulence and potential population-level effects than any infectious agent detected in Greater Sage-Grouse to date. Research has demonstrated that (1) parasites and diseases can have population-level effects on grouse species; (2) new infectious diseases are emerging; and (3) habitat fragmentation is increasing the number of small, isolated populations of Greater Sage-Grouse. Natural resource management agencies need to develop additional research and systematic monitoring programs for evaluating the role of micro-and macro parasites, especially West Nile virus, infectious bronchitis and other corona viruses, avian retroviruses, Mycoplasma spp., and Eimeria spp. and associated enteric bacteria affecting sage-grouse populations.

Authors

Christiansen, Thomas J.; Tate, Cynthia M.

Year Published

2011

Publication

Studies in Avian Biology

Locations
DOI

10.1525/california/9780520267114.001.0001

Susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to experimental infection with West Nile virusClark, L2006

Susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to experimental infection with West Nile virus

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus experimental infection greater sage-grouse vaccine West Nile virus

Abstract

Populations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have declined 45-80% in North America since 1950. Although much of this decline has been attributed to habitat loss, recent field studies have indicated that West Nile virus (WNV) has had a significant negative impact on local populations of grouse. We confirm the susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to WNV infection in laboratory experimental studies. Grouse were challenged by subcutaneous injection of WNV (10(3.2) plaque-forming units [PFUs]). All grouse died within 6 days of infection. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for 50% survival was 4.5 days. Mean peak viremia for nonvaccinated birds was 10(6.4) PFUs/ml (+/- 10(0.2) PFUs/ml, standard error of the mean [SEM]). Virus was shed cloacally and orally. Four of the five vaccinated grouse died, but survival tune was increased (50% survival = 9.5 days), with 1 grouse surviving to the end-point of the experiment (14 days) kith no signs of illness. Mean peak viremia for the vaccinated birds was 10(2.3) PFUs/ml (+/- 10(0.6) PFUs/ml, SEM). Two birds cleared the virus from their blood before death or euthanasia. These data emphasize the high susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to infection with WNV.

Authors

Clark, L; Hall, J; McLean, R; Dunbar, M; Klenk, K; Bowen, R; Smeraski, CA

Year Published

2006

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Diseases

Locations
SUSCEPTIBILITY OF GREATER SAGE-GROUSE TO EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH WEST NILE VIRUSClark, Larry2006

SUSCEPTIBILITY OF GREATER SAGE-GROUSE TO EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH WEST NILE VIRUS

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, experimental infection, greater sage-grouse, vaccine, West Nile virus, WNV

Abstract

Populations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have declined 45– 80% in North America since 1950. Although much of this decline has been attributed to habitat loss, recent field studies have indicated that West Nile virus (WNV) has had a significant negative impact on local populations of grouse. We confirm the susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to WNV infection in laboratory experimental studies. Grouse were challenged by subcutaneous injection of WNV (103.2 plaque-forming units [PFUs]). All grouse died within 6 days of infection. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for 50% survival was 4.5 days. Mean peak viremia for nonvaccinated birds was 106.4 PFUs/ml (±100.2 PFUs/ml, standard error of the mean [SEM]). Virus was shed cloacally and orally. Four of the five vaccinated grouse died, but survival time was increased (50% survival=9.5 days), with 1 grouse surviving to the end-point of the experiment (14 days) with no signs of illness. Mean peak viremia for the vaccinated birds was 102.3 PFUs/ml (±100.6 PFUs/ml, SEM). Two birds cleared the virus from their blood before death or euthanasia. These data emphasize the high susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to infection with WNV.

Authors

Klenk, Kaci, Bowen, Richard, Clark, Larry, Hall, Jeffrey, McLean, Robert, Dunbar, Michael and Smeraski, Cynthia A.

Year Published

2006

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Diseases

Locations
DOI

10.7589/0090-3558-42.1.14

Additional Information:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16699144

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin