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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Testing sagebrush allometric relationships across three fire chronosequences in Wyoming, USACleary, M. B.2008

Testing sagebrush allometric relationships across three fire chronosequences in Wyoming, USA

Keywords

aboveground biomass; Artemisia tridentate; plant allometry; root biomass; universal scaling

Abstract

Aboveground and coarse root allometric relationships were tested across three mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata var. vaseyana (Rydb.) chronosequences at three stages of recovery from fire (establishment, expansion, and mature) in Wyoming, USA. Big sagebrush shrubs dominate North American rangelands and are critical components of habitat for threatened species such as sage grouse. There were no differences in regression relationships estimating biomass over space and time, which reduces the need to destructively sample sagebrush for local studies and supports regional carbon modeling and biomass estimates. Crown volume (CV) explained the most variability (R-2 > 0.75) in aboveground biomass, and crown area (CA) explained the most variability for coarse roots (R-2 >0.87). Analyses supported both the 2/3 power universal scaling rules between leaf and stem biomass, but did not support global models of seed plant and reproductive part biomass. This study provides compelling evidence that simple field measurements may be used to estimate biomass over large regions and that universal scaling rules are valid for semiarid shrubs. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Authors

Cleary, M. B.; Pendall, E.; Ewers, B. E.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Arid Environments

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.jaridenv.2007.07.013

Nest Predation of Greater Sage-Grouse in Relation to Microhabitat Factors and Predators.COATES, PETER S.2010

Nest Predation of Greater Sage-Grouse in Relation to Microhabitat Factors and Predators.

Keywords

American badger;Centrocercus urophasianus;common raven;greater sage-grouse;nest predation;video monitoring

Abstract

Nest predation is a natural component of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) reproduction, but changes in nesting habitat and predator communities may adversely affect grouse populations. We used a 2-part approach to investigate sage-grouse nest predation. First, we used information criteria to compare nest survival models that included indices of common raven (Corvus corax) abundance with other survival models that consisted of day of incubation, grouse age, and nest microhabitat covariates using measurements from 77 of 87 sage-grouse nests. Second, we used video monitoring at a subsample of 55 of 87 nests to identify predators of depredated nests (n = 16) and evaluated the influence of microhabitat factors on the probability of predation by each predator species. The most parsimonious model for nest survival consisted of an interaction between day of incubation and abundance of common ravens (wraven×incubation day = 0.67). An estimated increase in one raven per 10-km transect survey was associated with a 7.4% increase in the odds of nest failure. Nest survival was relatively lower in early stages of incubation, and this effect was strengthened with increased raven numbers. Using video monitoring, we found the probability of raven predation increased with reduced shrub canopy cover. Also, we found differences in shrub canopy cover and understory visual obstruction between nests depredated by ravens and nests depredated by American badgers (Taxidea taxus). Increased raven numbers have negative effects on sage-grouse nest survival, especially in areas with relatively low shrub canopy cover. We encourage wildlife managers to reduce interactions between ravens and nesting sage-grouse by managing raven populations and restoring and maintaining shrub canopy cover in sage-grouse nesting areas.

Authors

COATES, PETER S. and DAVID J. DELEHANTY.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-047

Predators of Greater Sage-Grouse nests identified by video monitoringCoates, Peter S.2008

Predators of Greater Sage-Grouse nests identified by video monitoring

Keywords

American badger; camera; Centrocercus urophasianus; Common Raven; Greater Sage-Grouse; ground squirrel; nest predation; Nevada; video monitoring

Abstract

Nest predation is the primary cause of nest failure for Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), but the identity of their nest predators is often uncertain. Confirming the identity of these predators may be useful in enhancing management strategies designed to increase nest success. From 2002 to 2005, we monitored 87 Greater Sage-Grouse nests (camera, N = 55; no camera, N = 32) in northeastern Nevada and south-central Idaho and identified predators at 17 nests, with Common Ravens (Corvus corax) preying on eggs at 10 nests and American badgers (Taxidea taxis) at seven. Rodents were frequently observed at grouse nests, but did not prey on grouse eggs. Because sign left by ravens and badgers was often indistinguishable following nest predation, identifying nest predators based on egg removal, the presence of egg shells, or other sign was not possible. Most predation occurred when females were on nests. Active nest defense by grouse was rare and always unsuccessful. Continuous video monitoring of Sage-Grouse nests permitted unambiguous identification of nest predators. Additional monitoring studies could help improve our understanding of the causes of Sage-Grouse nest failure in the face of land-use changes in the Intermountain West.

Authors

Coates, Peter S.; Connelly, John W.; Delehanty, David J.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Field Ornithology

Locations
DOI

10.1111/j.1557-9263.2008.00189.x

EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ON INCUBATION PATTERNS OF GREATER SAGE-GROUSECoates, Peter S.2008

EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS ON INCUBATION PATTERNS OF GREATER SAGE-GROUSE

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, Common Raven, Greater Sage-Grouse, incubation, nest, predation, video.

Abstract

Birds in which only one sex incubates the eggs are often faced with a direct conflict between foraging to meet metabolic needs and incubation. Knowledge of environmental and ecological factors that shape life-history strategies of incubation is limited. We used continuous videography to make precise measurements of female Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) incubation constancy (percentage of time spent at the nest in a 24-hour period) and recess duration. We used an information-theoretic approach to evaluate incubation patterns in relation to grouse age, timing of incubation, raven abundance, microhabitat, weather, and food availability. Overall, sage-grouse females showed an incubation constancy of 96% and a distinctive bimodal distribution of brief incubation recesses that peaked at sunset and 30 min prior to sunrise. Grouse typically returned to their nests during low light conditions. Incubation constancy of yearlings was lower than that of adults, particularly in the later stages of incubation. Yearlings spent more time away from nests later in the morning and earlier in the evening compared to adults. Video images revealed that nearly all predation events by Common Ravens (Corvus corax), the most frequently recorded predator at sage-grouse nests, took place during mornings and evenings after sunrise and before sunset, respectively. These were the times of the day when sage-grouse typically returned from incubation recesses. Recess duration was negatively related to raven abundance. We found evidence that incubation constancy increased with greater visual obstruction, usually from vegetation, of nests. An understanding of how incubation patterns relate to environmental factors will help managers make decisions aimed at increasing productivity through successful incubation.

Authors

Coates, Peter S.; Delehanty, David J.

Year Published

2008

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.1525/cond.2008.8579

Efficacy of CPTH-treated egg baits for removing ravensCoates, Peter S.2007

Efficacy of CPTH-treated egg baits for removing ravens

Keywords

avicide, chicken egg baits, common raven, CPTH, Corvus corax, DRC-1330, human-wildlife conflicts, Nevada, wildfire damage management

Abstract

Human-altered landscapes have provided resource subsidies for common ravens (Corvus corax) resulting in a substantial increase in raven abundance and distribution throughout the United States and Canada in the past 25 years. Ravens are effective predators of eggs and young of ground-nesting birds. During 2002-2005, we tested whether chicken egg baits treated with CPTH (3-chloro-p-toluidine hydrochloride) could be used to manage raven numbers in an area where raven depredation was impacting sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) and greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations in Nevada. We performed multiple raven surveys at a treatment site and 3 control sites and used videography to identify predators and estimate egg bait consumption. We detected reductions in raven abundances over time at the treatment site during all years of this study and did not detect reductions in raven abundances at control sites. Videographic observations of egg consumption indicated that the standard 1:2 ratio (1 raven removed/2 eggs consumed) substantially overestimated raven take because nontarget species (rodents) consumed some egg baits. The technique described here likely will be effective at reducing raven densities where this is the intended management action.

Authors

Coates, Peter S.; Spencer, Jack O., Jr.; Delehanty, Did J.

Year Published

2007

Publication

Human-Wildlife Conflicts

Locations
The effects of raven removal on sage grouse nest success.Coates, Peter S.2004

The effects of raven removal on sage grouse nest success.

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, nest success, predator control, raven damage management, sage grouse, video nest monitoring

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Coates, Peter S.; Delehanty, David J.

Year Published

2004

Publication

Proceedings of The Vertebrate Pest Conference

Locations
Renesting by Sage Grouse in Southeastern IdahoCONNELLY, JW1993

Renesting by Sage Grouse in Southeastern Idaho

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus; Idaho;, nesting; radio-telemetry; renesting; reproduction; Sage Grouse

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

CONNELLY, JW; FISCHER, RA; APA, AD; REESE, KP; WAKKINEN, WL

Year Published

1993

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1369443

SEASONAL MOVEMENTS OF SAGE GROUSE IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHOCONNELLY, JW1988

SEASONAL MOVEMENTS OF SAGE GROUSE IN SOUTHEASTERN IDAHO

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We studied seasonal movements of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) on, and adjacent to, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho from summer 1977 through fall 1983. The study area included a mountain valley and sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) lowlands. Sage grouse used contiguous areas for wintering and breeding but moved as far as 82 km from winter and breeding areas to summer range. Juvenile sage grouse (n = 32) moved a mean distance of 14.9 km from summer to winter ranges and adult grouse (n = 33) moved a mean distance of 11.3 km. Male sage grouse from the mountain- valley population moved farther to summer range than did mountain-valley females and both sexes from lowland populations (P < 0.05). Movements by male and female sage grouse during fall were generally slow and meandering. Movements by females during spring were also slow and meandering compared to the relatively rapid and direct movements by males. Distances moved were not entirely influenced by the proximity of seasonal habitats, suggesting that seasonal movements tend to be traditional. Sage grouse pop- ulations should be defined on a temporal and geographic basis. Protection of sagebrush habitats within a 3.2 km radius of leks may not be sufficient to ensure the protection of year-long habitat requirement

Authors

CONNELLY, JW; BROWERS, HW; GATES, RJ

Year Published

1988

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3801070

Movements and Radionuclide Concentrations of Sage Grouse in Southeastern IdahoCONNELLY, JW1983

Movements and Radionuclide Concentrations of Sage Grouse in Southeastern Idaho

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Movements and radionuclide concentrations of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) sum- mering near nuclear facilities on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in southeastern Idaho were studied from 1977 through 1980. From 10 July through 7 September, 95% of all locations (N = 131) of radio- marked grouse were within 2 km of their feeding areas on lawns surrounding the facilities. During October and November, 82% of all radiolocations (N = 22) were greater than 2 km from these areas. The maximum 1-way movement to winter range was 81 km. Radionuclide concentrations (primarily radiocesium) were higher (P = 0.05) in sage grouse summering near a facility with liquid radioactive waste storage than in grouse summering near a solid radioactive waste disposal area or in control areas. The short biological half- life of the ingested radionuclides and the timing of sage grouse movements from summering areas reduced any potential radiation dose to a person consuming 1 of these birds

Authors

CONNELLY, JW; MARKHAM, OD

Year Published

1983

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3808063

Sage Grouse Use of Nest Sites in Southeastern IdahoCONNELLY, JW1991

Sage Grouse Use of Nest Sites in Southeastern Idaho

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We investigated nest site selection by sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in southeastern Idaho from 1987 to 1989. During 3 breeding seasons, 79% of 84 nest sites were found under sagebrush (Artemisia spp.). Nest success averaged 53% for grouse that used sagebrush and 22% for birds that used nonsagebrush nest sites. Total vegetative cover for sagebrush and nonsagebrush nest sites was similar. However, grass height was shorter (P = 0.01) at sagebrush compared to nonsagebrush nest sites. Herbaceous cover was important to nesting sage grouse but the relatively low nest success of nonsagebrush nest sites indicated they might provide less than optimal nesting habitat.

Authors

CONNELLY, JW; WAKKINEN, WL; APA, AD; REESE, KP

Year Published

1991

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3808984

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin