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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Sage Grouse Leks on Recently Disturbed SitesCONNELLY, JW1981

Sage Grouse Leks on Recently Disturbed Sites

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Three sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) leks located on recently disturbed areas within the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site are described. A possible increase in the grouse population and lack of suitable natural clearings in the general vicinity of these leks are suggested as reasons for the bird's use of these areas. This species' acceptance of newly cleared sites for display areas may have potential as a management tool.

Authors

CONNELLY, JW; ARTHUR, WJ; MARKHAM, OD

Year Published

1981

Publication

Journal of Range Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3898135

Response of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus populations to different levels of exploitation in Idaho, USAConnelly, JW2003

Response of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus populations to different levels of exploitation in Idaho, USA

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, exploitation, greater sage-grouse, hunting, Idaho, lek counts, population

Abstract

We investigated the response of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus populations to different levels of exploitation. From 1995 through 2002 we monitored breeding populations in areas closed to hunting, open to limited hunting (1-bird daily bag limit; 7-day season), and open to moderate hunting (2-bird daily bag limit; 23-day season). We used three approaches to assess the effects of hunting on sage-grouse populations. Results were consistent regardless of the method used and indicated that overall, areas closed to hunting had greater rates of increase for breeding populations than areas open to hunting (P = 0.018). Limited or moderate rates of exploitation apparently slowed population recovery for sage-grouse. These effects may have been more pronounced for grouse occupying relatively xeric habitats close to human population centers or highly fragmented habitats. Our results suggest that hunting seasons for sage-grouse should generally be conservative and reflect both sage-grouse population trend and quality of habitat occupied by the population.

Authors

Connelly, JW; Reese, KP; Garton, EO; Commons-Kemner, ML

Year Published

2003

Publication

Wildlife Biology

Locations
Effects of predation and hunting on adult sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus in IdahoConnelly, JW2000

Effects of predation and hunting on adult sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus in Idaho

Keywords

hunting, mortality, predation, radio-telemetry, sage grouse

Abstract

Although sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus have declined throughout their range in North America, little is known about annual mortality patterns of this species. Thus, we summarize a long-term data set on timing and causes of mortality of sage grouse. Predation was the most common cause of death for radio-marked sage grouse. For adult males, 83% of deaths were attributed to predation and 15% to hunting. However, for adult females, 52% of deaths were caused by predation while 42% were attributed to hunting. We rejected the hypothesis that type of mortality (predation vs hunting) was independent of gender of sage grouse. For males, 70% of deaths occurred during spring and summer (March-August) and 28% occurred in September-October. For females, 52% of mortalities occurred during spring and summer and 46% occurred in September-October. We rejected the hypothesis that time of death is independent of the gender of sage grouse. In six of 15 years (40%), harvest rates for adult females may have exceeded 10% while this rate was only exceeded in two of 15 years (13%) for adult males.

Authors

Connelly, JW; Apa, AD; Smith, RB; Reese, KP

Year Published

2000

Publication

Wildlife Biology

Locations
Response of a sage grouse breeding population to fire in southeastern IdahoConnelly, JW2000

Response of a sage grouse breeding population to fire in southeastern Idaho

Keywords

Artemisia, Centrocercus urophasianus, fire, habitat, lek, sagebrush, sage grouse

Abstract

Prescribed burning is a common method to eliminate sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) and has been suggested as a tool to enhance the habitat of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Effects of this practice on sage grouse have not been evaluated rigorously. We studied effects of prescribed fire on lek (traditional breeding display areas) attendance by male sage grouse occupying low-precipitation ( P > 0.10). During the postburn period (1990-94), male attendance at treatment leks declined 90% and control leks declined 63%. Although declines were similar between treatment and control leks during the preburn period, postburn declines were greater for treatment than control leks (0.05 < P < 0.10). We rejected the null hypothesis that for the 2 largest leks in both the treatment and control areas, counts were independent of years for preburn (0.05 < P < 0.70) and postburn (P less than or similar to 0.05) periods and concluded that breeding population declines became more severe in years following fire. Prescribed burning negatively affected sage grouse in southeastern Idaho and should not be used in low-precipitation sagebrush habitats occupied by breeding sage grouse.

Authors

Connelly, JW; Reese, KP; Fischer, RA; Wakkinen, WL

Year Published

2000

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
GREATER SAGE-GROUSE SELECT NEST SITES TO AVOID VISUAL PREDATORS BUT NOT OLFACTORY PREDATORSConover, Michael R.2010

GREATER SAGE-GROUSE SELECT NEST SITES TO AVOID VISUAL PREDATORS BUT NOT OLFACTORY PREDATORS

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, nest depredation, nest-site characteristics, olfactory predators, sage-grouse, visual predators.

Abstract

Birds can hide from visual predators by locating nests where there is cover and from olfactory predators where habitat features create updrafts, high winds, and atmospheric turbulence, but sites optimal for hiding from visual and olfactory predators often differ. We examined how Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) balance the dual needs of hiding from both visual and olfactory predators on Parker Mountain, Utah, where the Common Raven (Corvus corax) is the main visual predator and the striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) and American badger (Taxidea taxus) are the main olfactory predators. By comparing nest sites to random sites during 2005 and 2006, we found that sage-grouse nest at sites where their nests were obscured from visual predators but were exposed to olfactory predators. To validate these findings, we replicated the study in southwest Wyoming during 2008. Again, we found that visual obscurity at nest sites was greater than at control sites but olfactory obscurity was less. Our results indicate that Greater Sage-Grouse select nest sites where they will be concealed from visual predators but at the cost of locating nests where they are exposed to olfactory predators. In southwest Wyoming, we found that olfactory predators (mammals) and visual predators (birds) depredated an equal number of nests. By selecting nest sites with visual obscurity, Greater Sage-Grouse have reduced the threat from visual predators to where it was similar to the threat posed by olfactory predators.

Authors

Conover, Michael R.; Borgo, Jennifer S.; Dritz, Rebekah E.; Dinkins, Jonathan B.; Dahlgren, David K.

Year Published

2010

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.1525/cond.2010.090172

Mapping Oil and Gas Development Potential in the US Intermountain West and Estimating Impacts to SpeciesCopeland, Holly E.2009

Mapping Oil and Gas Development Potential in the US Intermountain West and Estimating Impacts to Species

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Background: Many studies have quantified the indirect effect of hydrocarbon-based economies on climate change and biodiversity, concluding that a significant proportion of species will be threatened with extinction. However, few studies have measured the direct effect of new energy production infrastructure on species persistence.Methodology/Principal Findings: We propose a systematic way to forecast patterns of future energy development and calculate impacts to species using spatially-explicit predictive modeling techniques to estimate oil and gas potential and create development build-out scenarios by seeding the landscape with oil and gas wells based on underlying potential. We illustrate our approach for the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the western US and translate the build-out scenarios into estimated impacts on sage-grouse. We project that future oil and gas development will cause a 7-19 percent decline from 2007 sage-grouse lek population counts and impact 3.7 million ha of sagebrush shrublands and 1.1 million ha of grasslands in the study area.Conclusions/Significance: Maps of where oil and gas development is anticipated in the US Intermountain West can be used by decision-makers intent on minimizing impacts to sage-grouse. This analysis also provides a general framework for using predictive models and build-out scenarios to anticipate impacts to species. These predictive models and build-out scenarios allow tradeoffs to be considered between species conservation and energy development prior to implementation.

Authors

Copeland, Holly E.; Doherty, Kevin E.; Naugle, David E.; Pocewicz, Amy; Kiesecker, Joseph M.

Year Published

2009

Publication

PLOS One

Locations
DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0007400

Sage Grouse Population Trends in Oregon, 1941-1983Crawford, J.A.1985

Sage Grouse Population Trends in Oregon, 1941-1983

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Crawford, J.A.; Lutz, R.S.

Year Published

1985

Publication

The Murrelet

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3535162

Ecology and management of sage-grouse and sage-grouse habitatCrawford, John A.2004

Ecology and management of sage-grouse and sage-grouse habitat

Keywords

population dynamics, habitat, fire ecology, livestock grazing, herbicide, landscape ecology

Abstract

Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus and C. minimus) historically inhabited much of the sagebrush-dominated habitat of North America. Today, sage-grouse populations are declining throughout most of their range. Population dynamics of sage-grouse are marked by strong cyclic behavior. Adult survival is high, but is offset by low juvenile survival, resulting in low productivity. Habitat for sage-grouse varies strongly by life-history stage. Critical habitat components include adequate canopy cover of tall grasses (≥ 18 cm) and medium height shrubs (40–80 cm) for nesting, abundant forbs and insects for brood rearing, and availability of herbaceous riparian species for late-growing season foraging. Fire ecology of sage-grouse habitat changed dramatically with European settlement. In high elevation sagebrush habitat, fire return intervals have increased (from 12–24 to > 50 years) resulting in invasion of conifers and a consequent loss of understory herbaceous and shrub canopy cover. In lower elevation sagebrush habitat, fire return intervals have decreased dramatically (from 50–100 to < 10 years) due to invasion by annual grasses, causing loss of perennial bunchgrasses and shrubs. Livestock grazing can have negative or positive impacts on sage-grouse habitat depending on the timing and intensity of grazing, and which habitat element is being considered. Early season light to moderate grazing can promote forb abundance/availability in both upland and riparian habitats. Heavier levels of utilization decrease herbaceous cover, and may promote invasion by undesirable species. At rates intended to produce high sagebrush kill, herbicide-based control of big sagebrush may result in decreased habitat quality for sage-grouse. Light applications of tebuthiuron (N-[5-(1,1-dimethylethyl)-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]-N,N′-dimethylurea) can decrease canopy cover of sagebrush and increase grass and forb production which may be locally important to nesting and foraging activities. The ability of resource managers to address sage-grouse habitat concerns at large scales is aided greatly by geomatics technology and advances in landscape ecology. These tools allow unprecedented linkage of habitat and population dynamics data over space and time and can be used to retroactively assess such relationships using archived imagery. The present sage-grouse decline is a complex issue that is likely associated with multiple causative factors. Solving management issues associated with the decline will require unprecedented cooperation among wildlife biology, range science, and other professional disciplines.

Authors

Schroeder, Michael A., Crawford, John A., Miller, Richard F., Boyd, Chad S., Mosley, Jeffrey C., Gregg, Michael A., OLSON, RICH A., WEST, NEIL E. and WHITSON, TOM D.

Year Published

2004

Publication

Rangeland Ecology & Management

Locations
    DOI

    10.2111/1551-5028(2004)057[0002:EAMOSA]2.0.CO;2

    Age and Sex of Sage Grouse from WingsCrunden, C. W.1963

    Age and Sex of Sage Grouse from Wings

    Keywords

    No keywords available

    Abstract

    A technique is described for determining age and sex of sage grouse (Centrocercus uropha- sianus) from wings collected during August and September hunting seasons. Easily discernible pri- mary molt characteristics (retention of primaries 1 and 2 in juveniles and the difference in length of primaries 2 and 3 between adults and juveniles when primary 3 has not yet molted) have been com- bined with four basic wing measurements in an age and sex key. The relatively slow method of measuring primaries with a ruler is replaced by a measuring board with a backstop and three lines scribed across its face for use with the age and sex key. Wings are measured in a flat and straightened position from the skin-covered wrist joint to the tip of the desired primary and compared to the appropriate lines on the measuring board. Statistics estimating the probability of misclassification for each of the four measurement categories are given

    Authors

    Crunden, C. W.

    Year Published

    1963

    Publication

    The Journal of Wildlife Management

    Locations
    DOI

    10.2307/3798498

    Greater sage-grouse response to sagebrush management in UtahDahlgren, David K.2006

    Greater sage-grouse response to sagebrush management in Utah

    Keywords

    Centrocercus urophasianusgreater sage-grouseIdahojuvenile survivalpower-line collisionspredationseasonal movements

    Abstract

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations throughout much of their range have been declining. These declines have largely been attributed to the loss or deterioration of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitat. In response government agencies such as the United States Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service are cost-sharing on management practices designed to improve habitat conditions for sage-grouse. Little is known regarding sage-grouse response to various sagebrush management techniques. We studied the effects of reducing sagebrush canopy cover using 2 mechanical (Dixie harrow and Lawson aerator) treatments and 1 chemical (Tebuthiuron) treatment on greater sage-grouse use of brood-rearing habitats on Parker Mountain, Utah, USA. To conduct this experiment, we identified 19 40.5-ha plots that exhibited > 40% mountain big sagebrush (A. tridentata vaseyana) canopy cover and randomly assigned 16 as treatment or controls (4 replicates each). Tebuthiuron and Dixie-harrow-treated plots had more forb cover than did control plots (P = 0.01 and 0.02, respectively) in post-treatment periods. Greater sage-grouse brood use was higher in Tebuthiuron than control plots (P = 0.01). We believe this was attributed to increased herbaceous cover, particularly forb cover. However, in all plots, sage-grouse use was greatest within 10 m of the edge of the treatments where adjacent sagebrush cover was still available. Although the treatments we studied resulted in the plots achieving sage-grouse brooding-rearing habitat guidelines, caution should be exercised in applying these observations at lower elevations, on sites with less annual precipitation, or on a different subspecies of big sagebrush. Prior to using these techniques to implement large-scale sagebrush treatments, the specific rationale for conducting them should be clearly identified. Large-scale projects using the techniques we studied would not be appropriate within sage-grouse wintering or nesting habitat.

    Authors

    Dahlgren, David K.; Chi, Renee; Messmer, Terry A.

    Year Published

    2006

    Publication

    Wildlife Society Bulletin

    Locations
    DOI

    10.2193/0091-7648(2006)34[975:GSRTSM]2.0.CO;2

    Recent Articles

    The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

    by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

    In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

    published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

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    published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


    Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

    by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

    d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

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    by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

    The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

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