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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Achieving Better Estimates of Greater Sage-Grouse Chick Survival in UtahDahlgren, David K.2010

Achieving Better Estimates of Greater Sage-Grouse Chick Survival in Utah

Keywords

brood-mixing, Centrocercus urophasianus, chick survival, greater sage-grouse, productivity, radiotelemetry, suture method, Utah

Abstract

Declining sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations may be characterized by poor recruitment largely attributed to low chick survival. However, few published studies have explicitly examined factors that influence chick survival. We used a suture method to radiomark 1-2-day-old sage-grouse chicks (n = 150) in 2005-2006 on Parker Mountain in south-central Utah, USA, and monitored their survival to 42 days. We modeled effects of year, hatch date, chick age, brood-female age, brood-mixing, and arthropod abundance on chick survival. Our best model revealed an average survival estimate of 0.50 days to 42 days, which is the highest level ever documented for this long-lived species. Brood-mixing occurred in 21% (31/146) of chicks and 43% (18/42) of broods we studied. Moreover, yearling females had more chicks leave their broods than did adults. We found that survival may be higher among chicks that switch broods compared to those that stayed with their natal mother until fledging. Thus, brood-mixing may be an adaptive strategy leading to increased sage-grouse chick survival and higher productivity, especially among chicks born to yearling females. Our findings also indicate that arthropod abundance may be an important driver of chick survival, particularly during the early brood-rearing period and, therefore, sage-grouse populations may benefit from a management strategy that attempts to increase arthropod abundance via brood habitat management.

Authors

Dahlgren, David K.; Messmer, Terry A.; Koons, David N.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-093

EVALUATION OF BROOD DETECTION TECHNIQUES: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTIMATING GREATER SAGE-GROUSE PRODUCTIVITYDahlgren, David K.2010

EVALUATION OF BROOD DETECTION TECHNIQUES: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTIMATING GREATER SAGE-GROUSE PRODUCTIVITY

Keywords

brood counts, Centrocercus urophasianus, Greater Sage-Grouse, pointing dogs, spotlighting, walking surveys, Utah

Abstract

Obtaining timely and accurate assessment of sage-grouse (Centrocercus spp.) chick survival and recruitment is an important component of species management and conservation. We compared the effectiveness of walking, spotlight, and pointing-dog surveys to detect radio-marked and unmarked chicks within broods of radio-marked hens in Utah. Walking surveys detected 72% of marked chicks, while spotlight and pointing-dog surveys detected 100% and 96%, respectively. We found no difference between spotlight and pointing-dog counts in number of marked and unmarked chicks detected (P = 0.57). Spotlight counts were slightly inure time efficient than pointing-dog surveys. However, spotlight surveys were nocturnal searches and perceived to be more technically arduous than diurnal pointing-dog surveys. Pointing-dog surveys may offer greater utility in terms of area searched per unit effort and an increased ability to detect unmarked hens and broods.

Authors

Dahlgren, David K.; Messmer, Terry A.; Thacker, Eric T.; Gutter, Michael R.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Western North American Naturalist

Locations
DOI

10.3398/064.070.0210

Liver metal concentrations in Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)Dailey, Rebecca N.2008

Liver metal concentrations in Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, ICP-MS, liver, metals, sage-grouse

Abstract

Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are a species of concern due to shrinking populations associated with habitat fragmentation and loss. Baseline health parameters for this species are limited or lacking, especially with regard to tissue metal concentrations. To obtain a range of tissue metal concentrations, livers were collected from 71 Greater Sage-grouse from Wyoming and Montana. Mean SE metal concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in liver were determined for vanadium (V) (0.12 +/- 0.01), chromium (Cr) (0.50 +/- 0.02), manganese (Mn) (2.68 +/- 0.11), iron (Fe) (1,019 +/- 103), nickel (Ni) (0.40 +/- 0.04), cobalt (Co) (0.08 +/- 0.02), copper (Cu) (6.43 +/- 0.40), mercury (Hg) (0.30 +/- 0.09), selenium (Se) (1.45 +/- 0.64), zinc (Zn) (59.2 +/- 4.70), molybdenum (Mo) (0.93 +/- 0.07), cadmium (Cd) (1.44 +/- 0.14), barium (Ba) (0.20 +/- 0.03), and lead (Pb) (0.17 +/- 0.03). In addition to providing baseline data, metal concentrations were compared between sex, age (juvenile/adult), and West Nile virus (WNv) groups (positive/negative). Adult birds had higher concentrations of Ni and Cd compared to juveniles. In addition, Zn and Cu concentrations were significantly elevated in WNv-positive birds.

Authors

Dailey, Rebecca N.; Raisbeck, Merl F.; Slemion, Roger S.; Cornish, Todd E.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Diseases

Locations
Liver Metal Concentrations in Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)Dailey, Rebecca N.2008

Liver Metal Concentrations in Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, ICP-MS, liver, metals, Sage-grouse

Abstract

Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are a species of concern due to shrinking populations associated with habitat fragmentation and loss. Baseline health parameters for this species are limited or lacking, especially with regard to tissue metal concentrations. To obtain a range of tissue metal concentrations, livers were collected from 71 Greater Sage-grouse from Wyoming and Montana. Mean±SE metal concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in liver were determined for vanadium (V) (0.12±0.01), chromium (Cr) (0.50±0.02), manganese (Mn) (2.68±0.11), iron (Fe) (1,019±103), nickel (Ni) (0.40±0.04), cobalt (Co) (0.08±0.02), copper (Cu) (6.43±0.40), mercury (Hg) (0.30±0.09), selenium (Se) (1.45±0.64), zinc (Zn) (59.2±4.70), molybdenum (Mo) (0.93 ± 0.07), cadmium (Cd) (1.44 ± 0.14), barium (Ba) (0.20 ± 0.03), and lead (Pb) (0.17 ± 0.03). In addition to providing baseline data, metal concentrations were compared between sex, age (juvenile/adult), and West Nile virus (WNv) groups (positive/negative). Adult birds had higher concentrations of Ni and Cd compared to juveniles. In addition, Zn and Cu concentrations were significantly elevated in WNv-positive birds.

Authors

Dailey, Rebecca N., Raisbeck, Merl F., Siemion, Roger S. and Cornish, Todd E.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Diseases

Locations
DOI

10.7589/0090-3558-44.2.494

Ecology, productivity and management of sage grouse in Idaho.Dalke, P. D.1963

Ecology, productivity and management of sage grouse in Idaho.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

A study of the seasonal movements, productivity, and management of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was undertaken by the Idaho Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit from August, 1952, to May, 1960, on an area in Fremont and Clark counties in Idaho, directly west of Yellowstone National Park. Nineteen individual strutting grounds 1/10-10 acres in size were located along 12 miles of the Red Road. Summer brood range was found to be 13-27 miles north and northeast of the Red Road strutting grounds. Flocks of sage grouse began migrating west and southwest in October and November and traveled 30-50 miles, depending upon the depth of the snow. Winter concentrations were usually found where snow was less than 6 inches deep. Dispersal and return east and northeast to the breeding grounds began in late winter for a yearly round trip of 50-100 miles. The number of adult males increased quickly on strutting grounds, and the peak of breeding occurred April 7-21. Strutting grounds were abandoned early in May if there was a high ratio of adults to subadults. A late season peak of subadult males was often seen on strutting grounds after all other grouse had departed. Interstrutting movements of adult males varied from 22 to 53 percent and up to 4.3 miles from original banding sites. Sexing criteria included plumage differences on chin, throat, breast, undertail coverts, and minor marginal tectrices; size of feet; wing length and length of primaries; weights of adults. Identification of gonads provided the only ready internal diagnostic characteristics of sex. Aging criteria included measurement of bursa, and characteristics of outer two primaries, second primary covert, undertail coverts, and sternum. The mandible test is not reliable for adult sage grouse. The high counts of males on strutting grounds has provided a reasonably accurate method of determining breeding population trends. The method may be as much as 20 percent conservative because of cocks which are not on strutting grounds. The reproductive potential cannot be fully assessed without knowledge of the relative proportion of adult to subadult females. Ovulated-follicle counts as a measure of the number of eggs laid are unreliable, but are useful in determining the relative laying effort between yearlings and adult females. Adverse weather during hatching appreciably lowered number of grouse available for fall hunting. Brood census on summer range is useful in determining reproductive success and is reliable until the third week in July, when brood structure begins to deteriorate.

Authors

Dalke, P. D.; Pyrah, D. B.; Stanton, D. C.; Crawford, J. E.; Schlatterer, E. F.

Year Published

1963

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
Directional acoustic radiation in the strut display of male sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianusDantzker, MS1999

Directional acoustic radiation in the strut display of male sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We present evidence that the acoustic component of the strut display of male sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus is highly directional and that the nature of this directionality is unique among measured vertebrates. Where vertebrate acoustic signals have been found to be directional, they rare most intense anteriorly and are bilaterally symmetrical. Our results show that sage grouse acoustic radiation (beam) patterns are often asymmetric about the birds' anterior-posterior axis. The beam pattern of the 'whistle' note is actually strikingly bilobate with a deep null directly in front of the displaying bird. While the sage grouse display serves to attract potential mates, male sage grouse rarely face females head on when they call. The results of this study suggest that males may reach females with a high-intensity signal despite their preference for an oblique display posture relative to those females. We characterized these patterns using a novel technique that allowed us to map acoustic radiation patterns of unrestrained animals calling in the wild. Using an eight-microphone array, our technique integrates acoustic localization with synchronous pressure-field measurements while controlling for small-scale environmental variation in sound propagation.

Authors

Dantzker, MS; Deane, GB; Bradbury, JW

Year Published

1999

Publication

Journal of Experimental Biology

Locations
Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern OregonDavies, Kirk W.2011

Are There Benefits to Mowing Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities? An Evaluation in Southeastern Oregon

Keywords

Annual grass Artemisia tridentata Bromus tectorum Brush control Brush management Sage-grouse

Abstract

Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young) communities frequently are mowed in an attempt to increase perennial herbaceous vegetation. However, there is limited information as to whether expected benefits of mowing are realized when applied to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understory vegetation. We compared vegetation and soil nutrient concentrations in mowed and undisturbed reference plots in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities at eight sites for three years post-treatment. Mowing generally did not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation cover, density, or biomass production (P > 0.05). Annual forbs and exotic annual grasses were generally greater in the mowed compared to the reference treatment (P < 0.05). By the third year post-treatment annual forb and annual grass biomass production was more than nine and sevenfold higher in the mowed than reference treatment, respectively. Our results imply that the application of mowing treatments in Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities does not increase perennial herbaceous vegetation, but may increase the risk that exotic annual grasses will dominate the herbaceous vegetation. We suggest that mowing Wyoming big sagebrush communities with intact understories does not produce the expected benefits. However, the applicability of our results to Wyoming big sagebrush communities with greater sagebrush cover and/or degraded understories needs to be evaluated.

Authors

Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jon D.; Nafus, Aleta M.

Year Published

2011

Publication

Environmental Management

Locations
DOI

10.1007/s00267-011-9715-3

Vegetation characteristics across part of the Wyoming big sagebrush allianceDavies, Kirk W.2006

Vegetation characteristics across part of the Wyoming big sagebrush alliance

Keywords

Artemisia tridentata spp. wyomingensis, cover potential, plant associations, vegetation cover, sage-grouse

Abstract

The Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis [Beetle & A. Young] S.L. Welsh) alliance is the most extensive of the big sagebrush complex in the Intermountain West. This alliance provides critical habitat for many sagebrush obligate and facultative wildlife species and serves as a forage base for livestock production. There is a lack of information that describes vegetation cover values, characteristics, diversity, and heterogeneity of the Wyoming big sagebrush alliance. This study describes vegetation cover values and defines distinct associations for intact, late-seral Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities across part of its northwestern range. We sampled 107 Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. Total herbaceous cover values were variable among sites with differences between sites exceeding 700%. Mean sagebrush cover was 12.3% with 90% of the sites producing 6% to 20% cover. Tall forb (> 18 cm) cover averaged 1.9% and 90% of the sites varied between 0.2% and 5.6% cover. Five associations delineated by dominant perennial bunchgrass species were identified: ARTRW8 (Wyoming big sagebrush)[PSSP6 (Pseudoroegneria spicata [Pursh] A. Love, bluebunch wheatgrass), ARTRW8/ACTH7 (Achnatherum thurberianum [Piper] Barkworth, Thurber's needlegrass), ARTRW8/FEID (Festuca idahoensis Elmer, Idaho fescue), ARTRW8/HECO26 (Hesperostipa comata [Trin. & Rupr.] Barkworth, needle-and-thread), and ARTRW8/PSSP6ACTH7 (a codominance of bluebunch wheatgrass and Thurber's needlegrass). Our results suggest when the vegetation cover values proposed for sage-grouse are applied as requirements at or above the stand level, they exceed the ecological potential of many of the sites sampled.

Authors

Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jonatban D.; Miller, Ricbard E.

Year Published

2006

Publication

Rangeland Ecology & Management

Locations
DOI

10.2111/06-004R2.1

Vegetation Characteristics of Mountain and Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities in the Northern Great BasinDavies, Kirk W.2010

Vegetation Characteristics of Mountain and Wyoming Big Sagebrush Plant Communities in the Northern Great Basin

Keywords

Artemisia tridentata, diversity, habitat, herbaceous cover, sage-grouse

Abstract

Dominant plant species are often used as indicators of site potential in forest and rangelands. However, subspecies of dominant vegetation often indicate different site characteristics and, therefore, may be more useful indicators of plant community potential and provide more precise information for management. Big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) occurs across large expanses of the western United States. Common subspecies of big sagebrush have considerable variation in the types of sites they occupy, but information that quantifies differences in their vegetation characteristics is lacking. Consequently, wildlife and land management guidelines frequently do not differentiate between subspecies of big sagebrush. To quantify vegetation characteristics between two common subspecies of big sagebrush, we sampled 106 intact big sagebrush plant communities. Half of the sampled plant communities were Wyoming big sagebrush (A. tridentata subsp. wyomingensis [Beetle & A. Young] S. L. Welsh) plant communities, and the other half were mountain big sagebrush (A. tridentata subsp. vaseyana [Rydb.] Beetle) plant communities. In general, mountain big sagebrush plant communities were more diverse and had greater vegetation cover, density, and biomass production than Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. Sagebrush cover was, on average, 2.4-fold higher in mountain big sagebrush plant communities. Perennial forb density and cover were 3.8- and 5.6-fold greater in mountain compared to Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. Total herbaceous biomass production was approximately twofold greater in mountain than Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. The results of this study suggest that management guidelines for grazing, wildlife habitat, and other uses should recognize widespread subspecies as indicators of differences in site potentials.

Authors

Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jon D.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Rangeland Ecology & Management

Locations
DOI

10.2111/REM-D-09-00055.1

Relationships between Vegetational Structure and Predation of Artificial Sage Grouse NestsDELONG, AK1995

Relationships between Vegetational Structure and Predation of Artificial Sage Grouse Nests

Keywords

artificial nest, Centrocercus urophasianus, habitat, nesting, Oregon, predation, sage grouse

Abstract

Because of high nest predation and long-term declines in sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) productivity in Oregon, we assessed the effects of vegetational cover and height on predation of artificial sage grouse nests (n = 330). Artificial nest fate was positively associated with tall grass cover and medium-height shrub cover collectively (P = 0.01). No other vegetation, predator, temporal, or spatial variables explained any additional variation in the probability of predation. This study supports the hypothesis that greater amounts of tall grass and medium-height shrub cover at nest sites lower risk of nest predation for sage grouse. Management practices that increase cover and height of native grasses in sagebrush communities with medium-height shrubs are recommended to enhance sage grouse productivity.

Authors

DELONG, AK; CRAWFORD, JA; DELONG, DC

Year Published

1995

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3809119

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In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

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The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

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