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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Unusually High Reproductive Effort by Sage Grouse in a Fragmented Habitat in North-Central WashingtonSchroeder, MA1997

Unusually High Reproductive Effort by Sage Grouse in a Fragmented Habitat in North-Central Washington

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, clutch size, life history, nesting, productivity, renesting, Sage Grouse

Abstract

Productivity of Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was studied in north-central Washington during 1992-1996. Nest timing and success, clutch size, probability of nesting and renesting, and variation associated with age and year were examined for 84 females monitored with the aid of radio telemetry. Although date of nest initiation varied annually, yearling females (hatched in previous year) consistently nested later than adults; mean date of initiation of incubation was 22 April overall. The average nest contained 9.1 eggs and was incubated for 27 days. Clutch size was smaller for renests than for first nests; clutch size also varied annually. Although the overall rate of nest success was only 36.7%, all females apparently nested at least once, and at least 87.0% of females renested following predation of their first nests. As a result of renesting, annual breeding success was estimated as 61.3%. Percent of all females that produced a brood at least 50 days old was 49.5%; at least 33.4% of 515 chicks survived greater than or equal to 50 days following hatch. Although the rates of nesting and renesting appear to have been under-estimated in other studied populations, Sage Grouse in north-central Washington display more reproductive effort overall; they lay more eggs and are more likely to nest and renest.

Authors

Schroeder, MA

Year Published

1997

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1370144

Effects of prescribed fire on movements of female Sage Grouse from breeding to summer rangesFischer, RA1997

Effects of prescribed fire on movements of female Sage Grouse from breeding to summer ranges

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We compared summer movement patterns of female Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in southeastern Idaho before (1987-1989) and after (1990-1992) a prescribed fire which removed vegetation cover, primarily Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis), from approximately 57% of a 5800 ha area. Grouse moved 1-69 km ((x) over bar = 17.8 +/- 2.0 km [SE]; N = 81) from breeding and nesting areas to summer ranges, predominantly in northwest or southwest directions during the 6-year period. There was no difference in timing, distance, or direction moved between birds captured in burned and unburned habitats. The data provided further evidence of traditional migration routes for Sage Grouse breeding and nesting in the Big Desert.

Authors

Fischer, RA; Wakkinen, WL; Reese, KP; Connelly, JW

Year Published

1997

Publication

Wilson Bulletin

Locations
Nesting Habitat Selection by Sage Grouse in South-Central WashingtonSveum, CM1998

Nesting Habitat Selection by Sage Grouse in South-Central Washington

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

To characterize western sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus phaios Bonaparte) nesting habitat in sagebrush-steppe habitat in Washington, we initiated a study on the Yakima Training Center to determine nesting habitat characteristics and whether these characteristics differed between successful and depredated nests. Most nests (71%) were in big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata Nutt.)/bunchgrass communities. Nest habitat was characterized by greater shrub cover, shrub height, vertical cover height, residual cover, and litter than at random locations, Successful 1-m(2) nest sites within big sagebrush/bunchgrass in 1992 had less shrub cover (51%) and shrub height (64 cm) than depredated nest sites (70% and 90 cm, respectively). Successful 77-m(2) nest areas in big sagebrush/bunchgrass in 1993 had more tall grass (greater than or equal to 18 cm) than depredated nest areas. Management that protects the big sagebrush/bunchgrass community is essential for maintaining nesting habitat for sage grouse.

Authors

Sveum, CM; Edge, WD; Crawford, JA

Year Published

1998

Publication

Journal of Range Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/4003409

Use and selection of brood-rearing habitat by Sage Grouse in south central WashingtonSveum, CM1998

Use and selection of brood-rearing habitat by Sage Grouse in south central Washington

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) brood-habitat use was examined during 1992 and 1993 at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima and Kittitas counties, Washington. During the 2 yr we followed 38 broods, of which 12 persisted to 1 August ((x) over bar = approximately 1.5 chicks/brood). Food forb cover was greater at all brood locations than at random locations. Hens with broods in big sagebrush/bunchgrass habitat (Artemisia tridentata/Agropyron spicatum) selected for greater food forb cover, total forb cover, and lower shrub heights; broods in altered big sagebrush/bunchgrass habitats selected greater tall grass cover and vertical cover height; broods in grassland showed no preference for any measured vegetation characteristics. During the early rearing period (post-hatching-6 wk) each year, broods selected sagebrush/bunchgrass. Broods in 1993 made greater use of grasslands than in 1992 and selected grassland during the late brood-rearing period (7-12 wk). Broods selected for sagebrush/bunchgrass during midday, but 52% of brood locations in the afternoon were in grassland. Tall grass cover was greater at morning (0500-1000 h) and afternoon (1501-2000 h) brood locations than at midday (1001-1500 h) and random locations. Midday brood locations had greater shrub cover and height than morning and afternoon locations. Selection of habitat components was similar to the results of other studies, but habitat conditions coupled with a possible lack of alternate brood-rearing cover types resulted in low survival of chicks.

Authors

Sveum, CM; Crawford, JA; Edge, WD

Year Published

1998

Publication

Great Basin Naturalist

Locations
A population genetic comparison of large- and small-bodied sage grouse in Colorado using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA markersOyler-McCance, SJ1999

A population genetic comparison of large- and small-bodied sage grouse in Colorado using microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA markers

Keywords

Colorado;gene flow;microsatellites;mtDNA;sage grouse;speciation

Abstract

Sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) from southwestern Colorado and southeastern Utah (United States) are 33% smaller than all other sage grouse and have obvious plumage and behavioural differences. Because of these differences, they have been tentatively recognized as a separate 'small-bodied' species. We collected genetic evidence to further test this proposal, using mitochondrial sequence data and microsatellite markers to determine whether there was gene flow between the two proposed species. Significant differences in the distribution of alleles between the large- and small-bodied birds were found in both data sets. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that 65% of the variation in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes could be explained by the large- vs, small-bodied distinction. Genetic distances and neighbour-joining trees based on allelic frequency data showed a distinct separation between the proposed species, although cladistic analysis of the phylogenetic history of the mitochondrial sequence haplotypes has shown a lack of reciprocal monophyly. These results further support the recognition of the small-bodied sage grouse as a distinct species based on the biological species concept, providing additional genetic evidence to augment the morphological and behavioural data. Furthermore, small-bodied sage grouse had much less genetic variation than large-bodied sage grouse, which may have implications for conservation issues.

Authors

Oyler-McCance, SJ; Kahn, NW; Burnham, KP; Braun, CE; Quinn, TW

Year Published

1999

Publication

Molecular Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1046/j.1365-294x.1999.00716.x

Viability and Conservation of an Exploited Sage Grouse PopulationJohnson, KH1999

Viability and Conservation of an Exploited Sage Grouse Population

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We analyzed the viability of the Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population of North Park, Colorado, to evaluate its supposed decline due to hunting pressure and habitat degradation. Demographic data from 23 years of surveys were used to parameterize a post-breeding, female-based projection matrix with three life stages:juveniles, yearlings, and adults The population was found to be approximately stable or in decline only if immigration and apparent surveying errors were factored from the data set. Adult and juvenile survival and adult and juvenile reproduction, respectively, were identified as the most limiting demographic factors. Empirical evidence from designed experiments with Sage Grouse has shown that these demographic factors respond markedly to habitat manipulations, especially brush manipulation. Several plausible management scenarios were evaluated with 100-year population projections generated through Monte Carlo simulation (1000 iterations), sampling from a normal probability distribution entraining the observed variability in each demographic parameter (95% confidence limits). Habitat manipulations to achieve moderate levels (similar to 15% canopy cover) of sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) are recommended Regression analyses with power tests showed correspondence between hunting mortality and total mortality for juveniles and adults. Provided that habitat manipulations improve the survival of juveniles and adults, population viability may be conserved without reducing harvest by hunters.

Authors

Johnson, KH; Braun, CE

Year Published

1999

Publication

Conservation Biology

Locations
DOI

10.1046/j.1523-1739.1999.97284.x

Directional acoustic radiation in the strut display of male sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianusDantzker, MS1999

Directional acoustic radiation in the strut display of male sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We present evidence that the acoustic component of the strut display of male sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus is highly directional and that the nature of this directionality is unique among measured vertebrates. Where vertebrate acoustic signals have been found to be directional, they rare most intense anteriorly and are bilaterally symmetrical. Our results show that sage grouse acoustic radiation (beam) patterns are often asymmetric about the birds' anterior-posterior axis. The beam pattern of the 'whistle' note is actually strikingly bilobate with a deep null directly in front of the displaying bird. While the sage grouse display serves to attract potential mates, male sage grouse rarely face females head on when they call. The results of this study suggest that males may reach females with a high-intensity signal despite their preference for an oblique display posture relative to those females. We characterized these patterns using a novel technique that allowed us to map acoustic radiation patterns of unrestrained animals calling in the wild. Using an eight-microphone array, our technique integrates acoustic localization with synchronous pressure-field measurements while controlling for small-scale environmental variation in sound propagation.

Authors

Dantzker, MS; Deane, GB; Bradbury, JW

Year Published

1999

Publication

Journal of Experimental Biology

Locations
Molecular analysis of genetic variation among large- and small-bodied sage grouse using mitochondrial control-region sequencesKahn, NW1999

Molecular analysis of genetic variation among large- and small-bodied sage grouse using mitochondrial control-region sequences

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Kahn, NW; Braun, CE; Young, JR; Wood, S; Mata, DR; Quinn, TW

Year Published

1999

Publication

The Auk: Ornithological Advances

Locations
A NEW SPECIES OF SAGE-GROUSE (PHASIANIDAE: CENTROCERCUS ) FROM SOUTHWESTERN COLORADO Young, JR2000

A NEW SPECIES OF SAGE-GROUSE (PHASIANIDAE: CENTROCERCUS ) FROM SOUTHWESTERN COLORADO

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

The Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) is described as a new species from southwestern Colorado and contrasted with the Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) from northern Colorado and western North America. Gunnison Sage-Grouse differ from all other described sage-grouse (C. u. urophasianus. C. u. phaios) in morphological measurements, plumage, courtship display, and generics. The species currently is limited to 8 isolated populations in southwestern Colorado and adjacent San Juan County, Utah. Total estimated spring breeding population is fewer than 5000 individuals with the largest population (<3000) in the Gunnison Basin (Gunnison and Saguache counties), Colorado.

Authors

Young, JR; Braun, CE; Oyler-McCance, SJ; Hupp, JW; Quinn, TW

Year Published

2000

Publication

The Wilson Bulletin

Locations
DOI

10.1676/0043-5643(2000)112[0445:ANSOSG]2.0.CO;2

Changes in the distribution and abundance of sage grouse in Washington.Schroeder, Michael A.2000

Changes in the distribution and abundance of sage grouse in Washington.

Keywords

Sage grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, abundance, distribution, shrub-steppe, survey, Washington habitat fragementation

Abstract

Sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) historically occurred in shrub-steppe and meadow-steppe communities throughout much of eastern Washington. The decline in distribution has been dramatic; 73% of 67 lek complexes documented since 1960 are currently vacant. Many vacant lek complexes (53%) are in areas where sage grouse have been recently extirpated. The current range is about 8% of the historic range, occurring in 2 relatively isolated areas. Based on changes in number of males counted on lek complexes, the sage grouse population size in Washington declined at least 77% from 1960 to 1999; the 1999 spring population was estimated to be about 1,100 birds. Historic and recent declines of sage grouse are linked to conversion of native habitat for production of crops and degradation of the remaining native habitat. Although declines in populations of sage grouse appear to be slowing, the small size and isolated nature of the 2 remaining populations may be a long-term problem. Management should be directed toward protecting, enhancing, expanding, and connecting the existing populations.

Authors

Schroeder, Michael A.; Hays, David W.; Livingston, Michael F.; Stream, Leray E.; Jacobson, John E.; Pierce, D. John

Year Published

2000

Publication

Northwestern Naturalist

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3536821

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin