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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Landscape restoration for greater sage-grouse: implications for multiscale planning and monitoring.Wisdom, Michael J.2005

Landscape restoration for greater sage-grouse: implications for multiscale planning and monitoring.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Habitats and populations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have declined throughout western North America in response to a myriad of detrimental land uses. Successful restoration of this species' habitat, therefore, is of keen interest to Federal land agencies who oversee management of most remaining habitat. To illustrate the challenges and potential for landscape restoration, we summarized recent findings of restoration modeling for sage-grouse in the Interior Northwest. Changes in amount and quality of habitat were evaluated under proposed Federal management and under two restoration scenarios. Under the two scenarios, the rate of habitat loss was reduced and the quality of habitat was substantially improved compared to proposed management. These results have direct implications for restoration planning and monitoring. First, a strategic, multiscale approach is needed that links the scale of the stand with scales of the seasonal, year-round, and multipopulation ranges of sage-grouse. Second, consideration of connectivity across scales is essential. Third, extensive and sustained use of a holistic suite of passive and active restoration treatments is needed. And finally, monitoring of both habitat and population responses across scales is critical. We offer suggestions on these and related points for effective restoration planning and monitoring of sage-grouse habitat.

Authors

Wisdom, Michael J.; Rowland, Mary M.; Hemstrom, Miles A.; Wales, Barbara C.

Year Published

2005

Publication

U S Forest Service Rocky Mountain Research Station Proceedings

Locations
Evaluating lek occupancy of Greater Sage-Grouse in relation to landscape cultivation in the DakotasSmith, JT2005

Evaluating lek occupancy of Greater Sage-Grouse in relation to landscape cultivation in the Dakotas

Keywords

Greater Sage-Grouse, lek, North Dakota, satellite imagery, South Dakota.

Abstract

Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have been declining in many states and provinces of North America, and North and South Dakota hold no exception to these declines. We studied effects of cultivated land on Greater Sage-Grouse lek abandonment in North and South Dakota. Landscape-level data were assessed using satellite imagery within a geographic information system. Comparisons were made of 1972-1976 and 1999-2000 pet-cent cultivated and noncultivated land. These comparisons were made between land uses surrounding active leks versus inactive leks, active leks versus random locations, and abandoned regions versus active regions. The 1999-2000 imagery illustrated that percent Cultivated land was greater near abandoned leks (4-km buffers) than near active leks in North Dakota or random sites, but this did not hold true in South Dakota. Comparison of an extensive region of abandoned leks with a region of active leks in North Dakota illustrated a similar increase as well as dispersion of cultivation within the abandoned region. However, 1972-1976 imagery revealed that this relationship between percentage of cultivated land and lek activity in North Dakota has been static over the last 30 years. Thus, if the decline of Greater Sage-Grouse is the result of cultivated land infringements, it occurred prior to 1972 in North Dakota.

Authors

Smith, JT; Flake, LD; Higgins, KF; Kobriger, GD; Homer, CG

Year Published

2005

Publication

Western North American Naturalist

Locations
FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO PROCESS VARIANCE IN ANNUAL SURVIVAL OF FEMALE GREATER SAGE-GROUSE IN MONTANAMoynahan, Brendan J.2006

FACTORS CONTRIBUTING TO PROCESS VARIANCE IN ANNUAL SURVIVAL OF FEMALE GREATER SAGE-GROUSE IN MONTANA

Keywords

breeding status vs. survival;Centrocercus urophasianus;Greater Sage-Grouse;habitat protection;known fate;Montana, USA;population dynamics;process variance;program MARK;sagebrush;survival estimation;winter weather

Abstract

Populations of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have declined by 69–99% from historic levels, and information on population dynamics of these birds at a landscape scale is essential to informed management. We examined the relationships between hen survival and a suite of landscape-scale habitat and environmental conditions. We radio-marked 237 female Sage-Grouse and measured 426 vegetation plots during 2001–2004 at four sites in a 3200-km2 landscape in north-central Montana, USA. We used program MARK to model monthly survival rates for 11 seasonal intervals. There was strong support for the best-approximating model (AICc weight = 0.810), which indicated that (1) hen survival varied by season within years and by year within seasons, (2) nesting hens had higher nesting-season survival than non-nesting hens, and (3) individuals at one site had lower hunting-season survival than at other sites. We observed considerable variation in hen survival. Process variation was 0.255, with an expected range of annual survival of 0.12 to 1.0. The ratio of process to total variation was 0.999, indicating that observed variation was real and not attributable to sampling variation. We observed a nearly fourfold difference in maximum and minimum annual survival, ranging from 0.962 ± 0.024 (mean ± se) for nesting hens in 2001–2002 to 0.247 ± 0.050) for non-nesters in 2003–2004. Low annual survival in 2003 resulted from the compounded effects of a West Nile virus outbreak in August and a severe winter in 2003–2004. Increased hen mortality associated with severe winter weather contrasts with prior beliefs that Sage-Grouse populations are typically unaffected by winter weather conditions and underscores the importance of protecting winter sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitats.

Authors

Moynahan, Brendan J., Mark S. Lindberg, and Jack Ward Thomas.

Year Published

2006

Publication

Ecological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.1890/1051-0761(2006)016[1529:FCTPVI]2.0.CO;2

This article contributed by:

Ecological Society of America

Greater sage-grouse as an umbrella species for sagebrush-associated vertebratesRowland, MM2006

Greater sage-grouse as an umbrella species for sagebrush-associated vertebrates

Keywords

Conservation planning; Great Basin; Habitat risk; Greater sage-grouse; Sagebrush ecosystem; Umbrella species

Abstract

Widespread degradation of the sagebrush ecosystem in the western United States, including the invasion of cheatgrass, has prompted resource managers to consider a variety of approaches to restore and conserve habitats for sagebrush-associated species. One such approach involves the use of greater sage-grouse, a species of prominent conservation interest, as an umbrella species. This shortcut approach assumes that managing habitats to conserve sage-grouse will simultaneously benefit other species of conservation concern. The efficacy of using sage-grouse as an umbrella species for conservation management, however, has not been fully evaluated. We tested that concept by comparing: (1) commonality in land-cover associations, and (2) spatial overlap in habitats between sage-grouse and 39 other sagebrush-associated vertebrate species of conservation concern in the Great Basin ecoregion. Overlap in species' land-cover associations with those of sage-grouse, based on the p (phi) correlation coefficient, was substantially greater for sagebrush obligates ((x) over bar = 0.40) than non-obligates ((x) over bar = 0.21). Spatial overlap between habitats of target species and those associated with sage-grouse was low (mean phi = 0.23), but somewhat greater for habitats at high risk of displacement by cheatgrass (mean phi = 0.33). Based on our criteria, management of sage-grouse habitats likely would offer relatively high conservation coverage for sagebrush obligates such as pygmy rabbit (mean phi = 0.84), but far less for other species we addressed, such as lark sparrow (mean phi = 0.09), largely due to lack of commonality in land-cover affinity and geographic ranges of these species and sage-grouse. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Authors

Rowland, MM; Wisdom, MJ; Suring, LH; Meinke, CW

Year Published

2006

Publication

Biological Conservation

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.biocon.2005.10.048

A COMPARATIVE BEHAVIORAL STUDY OF THREE GREATER SAGE-GROUSE POPULATIONSTaylor, SE2006

A COMPARATIVE BEHAVIORAL STUDY OF THREE GREATER SAGE-GROUSE POPULATIONS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We compared male strut behavior of the genetically distinct Lyon, Nevada/Mono, California Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population with that of two proximal populations: Nye, Nevada, and Lassen, California. We measured strut rates and nine acoustic components of the strut display in all three populations. Male strut rates did not differ among populations. Acoustic components of the Lyon/Mono and Lassen populations were similar, whereas the Nye population was distinct. The genetically distinct Lyon/ Mono population was more similar behaviorally to the Nye population than the genetically similar Nye and Lassen populations were to each other. Overall, the Lyon/Mono population did not exhibit detectable differences in male strut behavior. Reproductive isolation through sexual selection does not appear to have occurred in the Lyon/Mono population.

Authors

Taylor, SE; Young, JR

Year Published

2006

Publication

The Wilson Journal of Ornithology

Locations
DOI

10.1676/1559-4491(2006)118[0036:ACBSOT]2.0.CO;2

Vegetation characteristics across part of the Wyoming big sagebrush allianceDavies, Kirk W.2006

Vegetation characteristics across part of the Wyoming big sagebrush alliance

Keywords

Artemisia tridentata spp. wyomingensis, cover potential, plant associations, vegetation cover, sage-grouse

Abstract

The Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis [Beetle & A. Young] S.L. Welsh) alliance is the most extensive of the big sagebrush complex in the Intermountain West. This alliance provides critical habitat for many sagebrush obligate and facultative wildlife species and serves as a forage base for livestock production. There is a lack of information that describes vegetation cover values, characteristics, diversity, and heterogeneity of the Wyoming big sagebrush alliance. This study describes vegetation cover values and defines distinct associations for intact, late-seral Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities across part of its northwestern range. We sampled 107 Wyoming big sagebrush plant communities. Total herbaceous cover values were variable among sites with differences between sites exceeding 700%. Mean sagebrush cover was 12.3% with 90% of the sites producing 6% to 20% cover. Tall forb (> 18 cm) cover averaged 1.9% and 90% of the sites varied between 0.2% and 5.6% cover. Five associations delineated by dominant perennial bunchgrass species were identified: ARTRW8 (Wyoming big sagebrush)[PSSP6 (Pseudoroegneria spicata [Pursh] A. Love, bluebunch wheatgrass), ARTRW8/ACTH7 (Achnatherum thurberianum [Piper] Barkworth, Thurber's needlegrass), ARTRW8/FEID (Festuca idahoensis Elmer, Idaho fescue), ARTRW8/HECO26 (Hesperostipa comata [Trin. & Rupr.] Barkworth, needle-and-thread), and ARTRW8/PSSP6ACTH7 (a codominance of bluebunch wheatgrass and Thurber's needlegrass). Our results suggest when the vegetation cover values proposed for sage-grouse are applied as requirements at or above the stand level, they exceed the ecological potential of many of the sites sampled.

Authors

Davies, Kirk W.; Bates, Jonatban D.; Miller, Ricbard E.

Year Published

2006

Publication

Rangeland Ecology & Management

Locations
DOI

10.2111/06-004R2.1

Total plasma protein and renesting by greater sage-grouseGregg, MA2006

Total plasma protein and renesting by greater sage-grouse

Keywords

age, blood chemistry, Centrocercus urophasianus, dietary protein, greater sage-grouse, maternal condition, nest initiation date, nest predation, nutrition, renesting, total plasma protein

Abstract

Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population declines have been attributed to reduced productivity. Although renesting by sage-grouse may contribute significantly to annual productivity during some years, little information is available on this aspect of sage-grouse reproductive ecology. We investigated the relationship between total plasma protein, age of hen, time of first nest initiation, and time of first nest loss on occurrence of renesting. We captured, assigned age, extracted blood, and radiomarked prelaying, female sage-grouse on 4 study areas during 1999-2004. We monitored radiomarked females from mid-April through June to identify period of nest initiation (early, mid, or late), nest loss (early or late), and renesting activity. We only considered hens that were available to renest (n = 143) for analysis, and we censored those that nested successfully or died during their first nest attempt. Depredation and abandonment accounted for 85% (122/143) and 15% (21/143) of the unsuccessful first nests, respectively. The proportion of hens renesting was 34% (48/143) across all study areas and years. Akaike's Information Criterion model selection indicated that occurrence of renesting varied by age, nest initiation period, nest loss period, and total plasma protein. The best model had low predictive power for any given hen (r(2) = 0.296), but validation of the best model indicated that our predictor variables were important for distinguishing renesting status and likely explained substantial temporal and spatial variation in renesting rates. A greater proportion of adults than yearlings renested, and hens that nested early in the nesting season and lost nests early during incubation were the most likely to renest. Hens that renested had greater total plasma protein levels than non-renesting hens independent of age, nest initiation period, and nest loss period. Because sage-grouse depend on exogenous sources of protein for reproduction, land management practices that promote high-quality, prelaying hen habitat could increase dietary protein intake and sage-grouse renesting rates.

Authors

Gregg, MA; Dunbar, MR; Crawford, JA; Pope, MD

Year Published

2006

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/0022-541X(2006)70[472:TPPARB]2.0.CO;2

Movements and survival of juvenile greater sage-grouse in southeastern IdahoBeck, Jeffrey L.2006

Movements and survival of juvenile greater sage-grouse in southeastern Idaho

Keywords

2002 Farm BillArtemisia spp.brood-rearingCentrocercus urophasianusDixie harrowgreater sage-grousehabitat managementLawson aeratorsagebrushTebuthiuronUtah

Abstract

Low recruitment has been suggested as a primary factor contributing to declines in greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations. We evaluated movements and survival of 58 radiomarked juvenile greater sage-grouse from 1 September(>= 10 weeks of age) to 29 March (>= 40 weeks of age) during 1997-1998 and 1998-1999 in lowland and mountain valley study areas in southeastern Idaho, USA. Juvenile sage-grouse captured in the mountain valley area moved an average of 2.2 km (20%) farther ((x) over bar = 13.0 km, SE = 1.2 km) from autumn to winter ranges than juvenile grouse captured in the lowland area ((x) over bar = 10.8 km, SE = 1.2 km). Ten of 11 deaths occurred from September to December. Fifty percent of deaths in the lowland population were attributable to human-related mortality including power-line collisions and legal harvest, while 33% and 17% of deaths were attributable to mammalian predators and unknown cause, respectively. All deaths in the mountain valley population were attributed to avian or mammalian predators. Survival was relatively high for birds from both populations, but was higher across years in the lowland ((S) over cap = 0.86, SE = 0.06, n = 43) than in the mountain valley population ((S) over cap = 0.64, SE = 0.13, n = 14). In our study-juvenile sage-grouse that moved farther distances to seasonal ranges experienced lower survival than juveniles from a more sedentary population. Moreover, high juvenile survival in our study suggests that if low recruitment occurs in sage-grouse populations it may be due to other factors, especially poor nesting success or low early chick survival.

Authors

Beck, Jeffrey L.; Reese, Kerry P.; Connelly, John W.; Lucia, Matthew B.

Year Published

2006

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
DOI

10.2193/0091-7648(2006)34[1070:MASOJG]2.0.CO;2

Effect of method, site, and taxon on line-intercept estimates of sagebrush coverWambolt, CL2006

Effect of method, site, and taxon on line-intercept estimates of sagebrush cover

Keywords

Artemisia nova; A. tridentata vaseyana; A. t. wyomingensis; black sagebrush; Centrocercus spp.; cover; line intercept; mountain big sagebrush; sage-grouse; vegetation; Wyoming big sagebrush

Abstract

Sage-grouse (Centrocercus spp.) are arguably the best known of the many wildlife species that inhabit sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) ecosystems. Lack of standardization in the procedures used to assess sagebrush cover may contribute to inconsistencies in reported habitat requirements for sage-grouse and other wildlife. We compared 3 applications of the line-intercept method for 3 sagebrush taxa. We sampled 2 mountain big sagebrush (A. tridentata vaseyana) sites, 2 Wyoming big sagebrush (A. t. wyomingensis) sites, and 1 black sagebrush (A. nova) site to determine whether the results generated by the 3 methods differed. Percent cover as determined by agency methods was up to 2.6 times greater than that from research applications. Cover differences among techniques were influenced by taxa and site (P <= 0.001) because both affected shrub morphology. We believe it will be difficult to identify and achieve wildlife habitat guidelines for minimal sagebrush cover requirements if methodologies are not standardized.

Authors

Wambolt, CL; Frisina, MR; Knapp, SJ; Frisina, RM

Year Published

2006

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
DOI

10.2193/0091-7648(2006)34[440:EOMSAT]2.0.CO;2

Gunnison sage-grouse use of Conservation Reserve Program fields in Utah and response to emergency grazing: A preliminary evaluationLupis, Sarah G.2006

Gunnison sage-grouse use of Conservation Reserve Program fields in Utah and response to emergency grazing: A preliminary evaluation

Keywords

Centrocercus minimus; Conservation Reserve Program; emergency grazing; Gunnison sage-grouse; habitat use; Utah

Abstract

Little information is available on the use of areas enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) by Gunnison sage-grouse (Centrocercus minimus) or the impacts of grazing on their habitat selection and movement patterns. Using radiotelemetry, we monitored 13 Gunnison sage-grouse in San Juan County, Utah, USA during 2001-2002 to determine their use of CRP. Additionally, in 2002 some of the CRP land used by the birds in 2001 was grazed under a drought emergency declaration. This afforded us an opportunity to monitor their response to livestock grazing. Although Gunnison sage-grouse used CRP for nesting, brood-rearing, and summer habitat, it was not selected in greater proportion than its availability (P <= 0.10) on the landscape. Bird-use sites in the CRP did not entirely meet habitat guidelines recommended by the Gunnison sage-grouse Rangewide Steering Committee (2005). Most of the sage-grouse we monitored avoided CRP fields when livestock were present. The one exception to this was a hen with a brood. We believe long-term maintenance of CRP in San Juan County will result in achieving habitat conditions that are more desirable for Gunnison sage-grouse. Future livestock management practices in areas used by Gunnison sage-grouse should incorporate short-term, high-intensity deferred-grazing rotations.

Authors

Lupis, Sarah G.; Messmer, Terry A.; Black, Todd

Year Published

2006

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
DOI

10.2193/0091-7648(2006)34[957:GSUOCR]2.0.CO;2

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin