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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Liver Metal Concentrations in Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)Dailey, Rebecca N.2008

Liver Metal Concentrations in Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, ICP-MS, liver, metals, Sage-grouse

Abstract

Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are a species of concern due to shrinking populations associated with habitat fragmentation and loss. Baseline health parameters for this species are limited or lacking, especially with regard to tissue metal concentrations. To obtain a range of tissue metal concentrations, livers were collected from 71 Greater Sage-grouse from Wyoming and Montana. Mean±SE metal concentrations (mg/kg wet weight) in liver were determined for vanadium (V) (0.12±0.01), chromium (Cr) (0.50±0.02), manganese (Mn) (2.68±0.11), iron (Fe) (1,019±103), nickel (Ni) (0.40±0.04), cobalt (Co) (0.08±0.02), copper (Cu) (6.43±0.40), mercury (Hg) (0.30±0.09), selenium (Se) (1.45±0.64), zinc (Zn) (59.2±4.70), molybdenum (Mo) (0.93 ± 0.07), cadmium (Cd) (1.44 ± 0.14), barium (Ba) (0.20 ± 0.03), and lead (Pb) (0.17 ± 0.03). In addition to providing baseline data, metal concentrations were compared between sex, age (juvenile/adult), and West Nile virus (WNv) groups (positive/negative). Adult birds had higher concentrations of Ni and Cd compared to juveniles. In addition, Zn and Cu concentrations were significantly elevated in WNv-positive birds.

Authors

Dailey, Rebecca N., Raisbeck, Merl F., Siemion, Roger S. and Cornish, Todd E.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Diseases

Locations
DOI

10.7589/0090-3558-44.2.494

Survival of Greater Sage-Grouse Chicks and Broods in the Northern Great Basin.GREGG, MICHAEL A.2009

Survival of Greater Sage-Grouse Chicks and Broods in the Northern Great Basin.

Keywords

brood;Centrocercus urophasianus;chick;forbs;greater sage-grouse;insects;Lepidoptera;radiotelemetry;survival

Abstract

Reduced annual recruitment because of poor habitat quality has been implicated as one of the causative factors in the range-wide decline of sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations since the 1950s. Because chick and brood survival are directly linked to annual recruitment and may be the primary factors that limit sage-grouse population growth, we estimated 28-day survival rates of radiomarked chicks and broods from 2000 to 2003. We examined relationships between survival and several habitat variables measured at brood sites, including food availability (insects and forbs); horizontal cover of sagebrush, grasses, and forbs; and vertical cover of sagebrush and grass. We monitored 506 radiomarked chicks from 94 broods; chick survival was 0.392 (SE = 0.024). We found evidence that both food and cover variables were positively associated with chick survival, including Lepidoptera availability, slender phlox (Phlox gracilis) frequency, total forb cover, and grass cover. The effect of total grass cover on chick survival was dependent on the proportion of short grass. The hazard of an individual chick's death decreased 8.6% (95% CI = ?1.0 to 18.3) for each percentage point increase in total grass cover when the proportion of short grass was >70%. Survival of 83 radiomarked broods was 0.673 (SE = 0.055). Lepidoptera availability and slender phlox frequency were the only habitat variables related to brood survival. Risk of total brood loss decreased by 11.8% (95% CI = 1.2-22.5) for each additional Lepidoptera individual and 2.7% (95% CI = ?0.4 to 5.8) for each percentage point increase in the frequency of slender phlox found at brood sites. Model selection results revealed that temporal differences in brood survival were associated with variation in the availability of Lepidoptera and slender phlox. Years with high brood survival corresponded with years of high Lepidoptera availability and high slender phlox frequency. These foods likely provided high-quality nutrition for chicks during early growth and development and enhanced survival. Habitat management that promotes Lepidoptera and slender phlox abundance during May and June (i.e., early brood rearing) should have a positive effect on chick and brood survival in the short term and potentially increase annual recruitment.

Authors

GREGG, MICHAEL A. and JOHN A. CRAWFORD.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2007-410

Recovery of Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Features in Wyoming Big Sagebrush following Prescribed Fire.Beck, Jeffrey L.2009

Recovery of Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Features in Wyoming Big Sagebrush following Prescribed Fire.

Keywords

Artemisia tripartita wyomingensis;Artemisia tripartita;Bromus tectorum;Centrocercus urophasianus;Cheatgrass;fire ecology;forbs;Greater Sage-Grouse;nesting cover;shrub canopy cover;shrub height;Threetip sagebrush;Wyoming big sagebrush

Abstract

The ability of prescribed fire to enhance habitat features for Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis) in western North America is poorly understood. We evaluated recovery of habitat features important to wintering, nesting, and early brood-rearing Sage-Grouse in Wyoming big sagebrush following prescribed fire. Our case study included 1 year of preburn (1989) and 10 years of postburn data collected over 14 years (1990-2003) from control and burned study areas in the Big Desert of southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. We compared recovery and rate of change for 12 features in four categories between burned and control transects and recovery in burned transects including change in variation. Our results indicate that prescribed fire induced quantifiable changes in wintering, nesting, and early brood-rearing Sage-Grouse habitat features 14 years after fire in Wyoming big sagebrush in our study area. Specifically, grass and litter required by Sage-Grouse for nest and brood concealment recovered relatively rapidly following fire; major forb cover was similar between burned and control sites, but the rate of increase for major forb cover and richness was greater in control transects, and structurally mediated habitat features required by Sage-Grouse for food and cover in winter and for nest and brood concealment in spring recovered slowly following fire. Because shrub structural features in our study did not recover in magnitude or variability to preburn levels 14 years after fire, we recommend that managers avoid burning Wyoming big sagebrush to enhance Sage-Grouse habitat, but rather implement carefully planned treatments that maintain Sagebrush.

Authors

Beck, Jeffrey L., John W. Connelly and Kerry P. Reese.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Restoration Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1111/j.1526-100X.2008.00380.x

Post-fire seeding on Wyoming big sagebrush ecological sites: Regression analyses of seeded nonnative and native species densitiesEiswerth, Mark E.2009

Post-fire seeding on Wyoming big sagebrush ecological sites: Regression analyses of seeded nonnative and native species densities

Keywords

Rangeland; Great Basin; Emergency fire rehabilitation; Sagebrush; Seeding

Abstract

Since the mid-1980s, sagebrush rangelands in the Great Basin of the United States have experienced more frequent and larger wildfires. These fires affect livestock forage, the sagebrush/grasses/forbs mosaic that is important for many wildlife species (e.g., the greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophosianus)), post-fire flammability and fire frequency. When a sagebrush, especially a Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Beetle & A. Young)), dominated area largely devoid of herbaceous perennials burns, it often transitions to an annual dominated and highly flammable plant community that thereafter excludes sagebrush and native perennials. Considerable effort is devoted to revegetating rangeland following fire, but to date there has been very little analysis of the factors that lead to the success of this revegetation. This paper utilizes a revegetation monitoring dataset to examine the densities of three key types of vegetation, specifically normative seeded grasses, normative seeded forbs, and native Wyoming big sagebrush, at several points in time following seeding. We find that unlike forbs, increasing the seeding rates for grasses does not appear to increase their density (at least for the sites and seeding rates we examined). Also, seeding Wyoming big sagebrush increases its density with time since fire. Seeding of grasses and forbs is less successful at locations that were dominated primarily by annual grasses (cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.)), and devoid of shrubs, prior to wildfire. This supports the hypothesis of a "closing window of opportunity" for seeding at locations that burned sagebrush for the first time in recent history. (c) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Authors

Eiswerth, Mark E.; Krauter, Karl; Swanson, Sherman R.; Zielinski, Mike

Year Published

2009

Publication

Journal of Environmental Management

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.jenvman.2008.07.009

Factors affecting nest-site selection and nest success of translocated greater sage grouseBaxter, Rick J.2009

Factors affecting nest-site selection and nest success of translocated greater sage grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Translocations have been used for decades to restore or augment wildlife populations, yet more often than not, little to no data and/or arbitrary means are used for determining translocation success. The objectives of our study were to describe nesting habitat utilised by the greater sage grouse translocated into an extant population and to identify factors related to nest success, thereby demonstrating the adaptability of the birds to their new environment and producing one measure of long-term translocation success. We trapped female grouse individuals during the spring on and near leks of source populations, fitted them with radio-transmitters, and released them in the morning onto an active lek in an extant population in Strawberry Valley, Utah. We monitored translocated females for nesting activity and documented nesting attempts, nest success, clutch size and embryo viability. Data were recorded on habitat variables associated with nest sites and paired-random sites, including factors known to be important for resident females that nested successfully. We used logistic regression and an a priori information-theoretic approach for modelling nest v. paired-random sites and successful v. unsuccessful nest sites. Our analyses suggested that crown area of the nest shrub and percentage grass cover were the two variables that discriminated between nest and paired-random sites. Females that nested successfully selected sites with more total shrub canopy cover, intermediate size-shrub crown area, aspects other than NW and SE, and steeper slopes than for unsuccessful nests. After being translocated from distant sites with differing habitat characteristics, these birds were able to initiate a nest, nest successfully, and select micro-habitat features similar to those selected by resident sage grouse across the species range. Our results demonstrate the adaptability of the translocated female sage grouse individuals and produce one tangible measure of long-term translocation success.

Authors

Baxter, Rick J.; Flinders, Jerran T.; Whiting, David G.; Mitchell, Dean L.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Wildlife Research

Locations
DOI

10.1071/WR07185

The Adrenocortical Response of Greater Sage Grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) to Capture, ACTH Injection, and Confinement, as Measured in Fecal Samples Jankowski, M. D.2009

The Adrenocortical Response of Greater Sage Grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) to Capture, ACTH Injection, and Confinement, as Measured in Fecal Samples

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Investigators of wildlife populations often utilize demographic indicators to understand the relationship between habitat characteristics and population viability. Assessments of corticosterone may enable earlier detection of populations at risk of decline because physiological adjustments to habitat disturbance occur before reproductive diminutions. Noninvasive methods to accomplish these assesments are important in species of concern, such as the greater sage grouse (GRSG). Therefore, we validated a radioimmunoassay that measures immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (ICM) in fecal samples and used it to characterize the adrenocortical response of 15 GRSG exposed to capture, intravenous injection of 50 IU/kg adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or saline, and 22 h of confinement. Those animals injected with ACTH exhibited a more sustained (P = 0.0139) and less variable (P = 0.0012) response than those injected with saline, indicating different levels of adrenocortical activity. We also found that potential field-collection protocols of fecal samples did not alter ICM concentrations: samples held at 4 degrees C for up to 16 h contained similar levels of ICM as those frozen (-20 degrees C) immediately. This study demonstrates a multiphasic adrenocortical response that varied with the level of stimulation and indicates that the assay used to measure this phenomenon is applicable for studies of wild GRSG.

Authors

Jankowski, M. D.; Wittwer, D. J.; Heisey, D. M.; Franson, J. C.; Hofmeister, E. K.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Physiological And Biochemical Zoology

Locations
DOI

10.1086/596513

A Landscape Approach for Ecologically Based Management of Great Basin ShrublandsWisdom, Michael J.2009

A Landscape Approach for Ecologically Based Management of Great Basin Shrublands

Keywords

cheatgrass; disturbance; resistance; sagebrush; Sage-grouse; woodlands

Abstract

Native shrublands dominate the Great Basin of western of North America, and most of these communities are at moderate or high risk of loss from non-native grass invasion and woodland expansion. Landscape-scale management based on differences in ecological resistance and resilience of shrublands can reduce these risks. We demonstrate this approach with an example that focuses on maintenance of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitats for Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a bird species threatened by habitat loss. The approach involves five steps: (1) identify the undesired disturbance processes affecting each shrubland community type; (2) characterize the resistance and resilience of each shrubland type in relation to the undesired processes; (3) assess potential losses of shrublands based on their resistance, resilience, and associated risk; (4) use knowledge from these steps to design a landscape strategy to mitigate the risk of shrubland loss; and (5) implement the strategy with a comprehensive set of active and passive management prescriptions. Results indicate that large areas of the Great Basin currently provide Sage-grouse habitats, but many areas of sagebrush with low resistance and resilience may be lost to continued woodland expansion or invasion by non-native annual grasses. Preventing these losses will require landscape strategies that prioritize management areas based on efficient use of limited resources to maintain the largest shrubland areas over time. Landscape-scale approaches, based on concepts of resistance and resilience, provide an essential framework for successful management of arid and semiarid shrublands and their native species.

Authors

Wisdom, Michael J.; Chambers, Jeanne C.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Restoration Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1111/j.1526-100X.2009.00591.x

Vocal and anatomical evidence for two-voiced sound production in the greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianusKrakauer, Alan H.2009

Vocal and anatomical evidence for two-voiced sound production in the greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus

Keywords

acoustic location system Galliformes lek microphone array syrinx syringeal muscle

Abstract

Greater sage-grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, have been a model system in studies of sexual selection and lek evolution. Mate choice in this species depends on acoustic displays during courtship, yet we know little about how males produce these sounds. Here we present evidence for previously undescribed two-voiced sound production in the sage-grouse. We detected this 'double whistle' (DW) using multi-channel audio recordings combined with video recordings of male behavior. Of 28 males examined, all males produced at least one DW during observation; variation in DW production did not correlate with observed male mating success. We examined recordings from six additional populations throughout the species' range and found evidence of DW in all six populations, suggesting that the DW is widespread. To examine the possible mechanism of DW production, we dissected two male and female sage-grouse; the syrinx in both sexes differed noticeably from that of the domestic fowl, and notably had two sound sources where the bronchi join the syrinx. Additionally, we found males possess a region of pliable rings at the base of the trachea, as well as a prominent syringeal muscle that is much reduced or absent in females. Experiments with a live phonating bird will be necessary to determine how the syrinx functions to produce the whistle, and whether the DW might be the result of biphonation of a single sound source. We conclude that undiscovered morphological and behavioral complexity may exist even within well-studied species, and that integrative research approaches may aid in the understanding of this type of complexity.

Authors

Krakauer, Alan H.; Tyrrell, Maura; Lehmann, Kenna; Losin, Neil; Goller, Franz; Patricelli, Gail L.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Journal of Experimental Biology

Locations
DOI

10.1242/jeb.033076

Mapping Oil and Gas Development Potential in the US Intermountain West and Estimating Impacts to SpeciesCopeland, Holly E.2009

Mapping Oil and Gas Development Potential in the US Intermountain West and Estimating Impacts to Species

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Background: Many studies have quantified the indirect effect of hydrocarbon-based economies on climate change and biodiversity, concluding that a significant proportion of species will be threatened with extinction. However, few studies have measured the direct effect of new energy production infrastructure on species persistence.Methodology/Principal Findings: We propose a systematic way to forecast patterns of future energy development and calculate impacts to species using spatially-explicit predictive modeling techniques to estimate oil and gas potential and create development build-out scenarios by seeding the landscape with oil and gas wells based on underlying potential. We illustrate our approach for the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the western US and translate the build-out scenarios into estimated impacts on sage-grouse. We project that future oil and gas development will cause a 7-19 percent decline from 2007 sage-grouse lek population counts and impact 3.7 million ha of sagebrush shrublands and 1.1 million ha of grasslands in the study area.Conclusions/Significance: Maps of where oil and gas development is anticipated in the US Intermountain West can be used by decision-makers intent on minimizing impacts to sage-grouse. This analysis also provides a general framework for using predictive models and build-out scenarios to anticipate impacts to species. These predictive models and build-out scenarios allow tradeoffs to be considered between species conservation and energy development prior to implementation.

Authors

Copeland, Holly E.; Doherty, Kevin E.; Naugle, David E.; Pocewicz, Amy; Kiesecker, Joseph M.

Year Published

2009

Publication

PLOS One

Locations
DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0007400

FITNESS AND NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT OF GREATER SAGE GROUSE (CENTROCERCUS UROPHASIANUS) USING HEMATOLOGIC AND SERUM CHEMISTRY PARAMETERS THROUGH A CYCLE OF SEASONAL HABITATS IN NORTHERN NEVADADyer, Kathryn J.2009

FITNESS AND NUTRITIONAL ASSESSMENT OF GREATER SAGE GROUSE (CENTROCERCUS UROPHASIANUS) USING HEMATOLOGIC AND SERUM CHEMISTRY PARAMETERS THROUGH A CYCLE OF SEASONAL HABITATS IN NORTHERN NEVADA

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, hematology, nutrition, sage grouse, seasonal habitats

Abstract

Bird health can significantly affect spring reproductive fitness. A better understanding of how female sage grouse health varies with seasonal nutrition changes provides insight for determining if specific nutritional habitats are limiting bird productivity. In 2004, greater sage grouse adult and yearling liens were captured, and blood samples collected, during breeding (MARCH: March 15 to April 11: n = 22). early brood rearing (MAY: May 20 to June 22; n = 21), and on summer range (JULY: July 7 to August 17; n = 19) ill two distinct but similar northern Nevada population management units (Tuscarora [TU] and Lone Willow [LW]). In TU, yearlings weighed less (P < 0.043) than adults at all sampling periods. No age-related differences were observed for LW birds. Serum blood chemistry values were influenced by site. bird age. and season. Adults had more plasma protein and albumin than yearlings during MARCH (P < 0.005) followed by a decrease by MAY (P < 0.0001), and no site differences were detected for MAY or JULY. Tuscarora yearlings had lower serum calcium levels than adults during MARCH (P < 0.0001): I-W yearlings had lower levels than adults during MAY (P = 0.030). Both TU yearlings (MARCH P < 0.0001) and adults (MARCH P < 0.0001: MAY P = 0.040) had lower Values than LW counterparts. Tuscarora adults and LW yearlings and adults showed decreases between MARCH and MAY (P < 0.0001). The combination of lower yearling weight, plasma protein, and serum calcium and phosphorus ill the TU birds indicates a lower nesting and re-nesting potential. Leading to the Conclusion that TU yearlings contributed less to the population production than LW yearlings for that particular year.

Authors

Dyer, Kathryn J.; Perryman, Barry L.; Holcombe, Dale W.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Journal of Zoo And Wildlife Medicine

Locations
DOI

10.1638/2007-0073.1

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin