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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Chapter 3: Potential acoustic masking of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) display components by chronic industrial noiseBlickley, J.L.2012

Chapter 3: Potential acoustic masking of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) display components by chronic industrial noise

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Anthropogenic noise can limit the ability of birds to communicate by masking their acoustic signals. Masking, which reduces the distance over which the signal can be perceived by a receiver, is frequency dependent, so the different notes of a single song may be masked to different degrees. We analyzed the individual notes of mating vocalizations produced by Greater Sage-Grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) and noise from natural gas infrastructure to quantify the potential for such noise to mask Greater Sage-Grouse vocalizations over both long and short distances. We found that noise produced by natural gas infrastructure was dominated by low frequencies, with substantial overlap in frequency with Greater Sage-Grouse acoustic displays. Such overlap predicted substantial masking, reducing the active space of detection and discrimination of all vocalization components, and particularly affecting low-frequency and low-amplitude notes. Such masking could increase the difficulty of mate assessment for lekking Greater Sage-Grouse. We discuss these results in relation to current stipulations that limit the proximity of natural gas infrastructure to leks of this species on some federal lands in the United States. Significant impacts to Greater Sage-Grouse populations have been measured at noise levels that predict little or no masking. Thus, masking is not likely to be the only mechanism of noise impact on this species, and masking analyses should therefore be used in combination with other methods to evaluate stipulations and predict the effects of noise exposure.

Authors

Blickley, J.L. & Patricelli, G.L.

Year Published

2012

Publication

Ornithological Monographs

Locations
DOI

10.1525/om.2012.74.1.23

Temporal and hierarchical spatial components of animal occurrence: conserving seasonal habitat for greater sage-grouseDzialak, M.R.2012

Temporal and hierarchical spatial components of animal occurrence: conserving seasonal habitat for greater sage-grouse

Keywords

diel cycle; energy development; GPS; greater sage-grouse, hierarchical process, individual variation;random effects; resource selection function; spatial modeling; sustainable landscape management; winter.

Abstract

Developing strategies for sustainable management of landscapes requires research that bridges regionally important ecological and socioeconomic issues, and that aims to provide solutions to sustainability problems.We integrated Global Positioning Systems (GPS) telemetry and statistical modeling to quantify hierarchical spatial and temporal components of occurrence among greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; n ¼ 87), a species of conservation concern, with the larger goal of developing spatially-explicit guidance for conservation of important winter habitat in a Wyoming, USA landscape undergoing development for energy resources. The pattern of occurrence at the landscape level (secondorder) and within seasonal use areas (third-order) included selection for shrub vegetation with a prominent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) component, and avoidance of rough terrain, mesic areas, and human activity. A change in resource selection behavior across the diel cycle was not an apparent component of the higherorder selection process; however, at the finer scale of investigation sage-grouse shifted behavior across the diel cycle in ways likely related to risk aversion or maintaining a favorable thermal environment (i.e., daytime- only avoidance of natural gas wells and night-time-only selection for taller shrubs). At both spatial scales there was considerably more variation among individuals in the sign of their association with anthropogenic features than with vegetation and terrain. The final spatially-explicit model, which depicted lower-order selection (local, patch-level, and seasonal use area) across the diel cycle constrained by selection processes at a higher order (second-order), validated well, offering specific guidance for managing human activity and sage-grouse conservation in the study area, and general guidance in developing sustainable landscape management strategies when animal occurrence reflects multiple spatial and temporal processes.

Authors

Dzialak, M. R., C. V. Olson, S. M. Harju, S. L. Webb, and J. B. Winstead

Year Published

2012

Publication

Ecosphere

Locations
DOI

10.1890/ES11-00315.1

This article contributed by:

Ecological Society of America

Survival of Translocated Greater Sage-Grouse Hens in Northeastern CaliforniaBell, Chad B.2012

Survival of Translocated Greater Sage-Grouse Hens in Northeastern California

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Translocation success of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is generally measured by documenting whether translocated individuals survive and reproduce at the release site. However. demographic parameters, such as annual survival of translocated individuals, provide a more accurate measure of translocation success. We translocated 60 female sage-grouse from Oregon and Nevada to Clear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, California, during 2005-2010 to augment a small population of resident grouse. We radio-marked each translocated female and a sample of resident female sage-grouse, recorded their locations, and monitored their survival at monthly intervals over the study period. We observed most (55/60) translocated birds near (<2 Delta AlCc) with the top model. However, the 1 coefficient distinguishing breeding from nonbreeding season survival was the only coefficient whose 95% confidence interval did not overlap zero; monthly survival during the breeding season (0.952 +/- 0.014) was lower than during the nonbreeding season (0.960 +/- 0.008). The model average estimate of annual survival for female sage-grouse in our study area was 59.6% (95% CI 47.9-70.1). Our analyses provide little support for a difference in survival between translocated and resident sage-grouse, :mud our annual survival estimates were comparable to annual survival estimates of resident sage-grouse in other locations. Our results suggest that when current recommendations for translocation protocols are followed, translocated female sage-grouse survive just as well as resident individuals and quickly integrate into the local population.

Authors

Bell, Chad B.; George, T. Luke

Year Published

2012

Publication

Western North American Naturalist

Locations
DOI

10.3398/064.072.0311

The secret sex lives of sage-grouse: multiple paternity and intraspecific nest parasitism revealed through genetic analysisBird, Krista L.2013

The secret sex lives of sage-grouse: multiple paternity and intraspecific nest parasitism revealed through genetic analysis

Keywords

lek, multiple paternity, nest parasitism, paternity, polygyny, sage-grouse

Abstract

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and females mating with multiple individuals). We found that most clutches had a single father and mother, but there was evidence of multiple paternity and intraspecific nest parasitism. Annually, most males fathered only one brood, very few males fathered multiple broods, and the proportion of all sampled males in the population fathering offspring averaged 45.9%, suggesting that more males breed in Alberta than previously reported for the species. Twenty-six eggs (2.2%) could be traced to intraspecific nest parasitism and 15 of 191 clutches (7.9%) had multiple fathers. These new insights have important implications on what we know about sexual selection and the mating structure of lekking species.

Authors

Bird, Krista L.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Carpenter, Jennifer E.; Paszkowski, Cynthia A.; Boyce, Mark S.; Coltman, David W.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Behavioral Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1093/beheco/ars132

Seasonal reproductive costs contribute to reduced survival of female greater sage-grouseBlomberg, Erik J.2013

Seasonal reproductive costs contribute to reduced survival of female greater sage-grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 individual female greater sage-grouse captured between 2003 and 2011, and examined the effect of reproductive effort on survival and future reproduction. Monthly survival of females was variable within years, and this within-year variation was associated with distinct biological seasons. Monthly survival was greatest during the winter (NovemberMarch; phi W= 0.99 +/- 0.001 SE), and summer (JuneJuly; phi S= 0.98 +/- 0.01 SE), and lower during nesting (AprilMay; phi N= 0.93 +/- 0.02 SE) and fall (AugustOctober; phi F= 0.92 +/- 0.02 SE). Successful reproduction was associated with reduced monthly survival during summer and fall, and this effect was greatest during fall. Females that successfully fledged chicks had lower annual survival (0.47 +/- 0.05 SE) than females who were not successful (0.64 +/- 0.04 SE). Annual survival did not vary across years, consistent with a slow-paced life history strategy in greater sage-grouse. In contrast, reproductive success varied widely, and was positively correlated with annual rainfall. We found evidence for heterogeneity among females with respect to reproductive success; compared with unsuccessful females, females that raised a brood successfully in year t were more than twice as likely to be successful in year t+ 1. Female greater sage-grouse incur costs to survival associated with reproduction, however, variation in quality among females may override costs to subsequent reproductive output.

Authors

Blomberg, Erik J.; Sedinger, James S.; Nonne, Daniel V.; Atamian, Michael T.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of Avian Biology

Locations
DOI

10.1111/j.1600-048X.2012.00013.x

Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for ConservationDzialak, Matthew R.2013

Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

Keywords

energy development, greater sage-grouse, landscape planning, resource selection, severe winter conditions, sustainability

Abstract

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperature averages, and that can establish an ecological bottleneck by which the landscape-level availability of critical resources becomes limited. We integrated methods to collect landscape-level animal occurrence data during severe winter conditions with estimation and validation of a resource selection function, with the larger goal of developing spatially explicit guidance for rangeland habitat conservation. The investigation involved greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) that occupy a landscape that is undergoing human modification for development of energy resources. We refined spatial predictions by exploring how reductions in the availability of sagebrush (as a consequence of increasing snow depth) may affect patterns of predicted occurrence. Occurrence of sage-grouse reflected landscape-level selection for big sagebrush, taller shrubs, and favorable thermal conditions and avoidance of bare ground and anthropogenic features. Refinement of spatial predictions showed that important severe winter habitat was distributed patchily and was constrained in spatial extent (7-18% of the landscape). The mapping tools we developed offer spatially explicit guidance for planning human activity in ways that are compatible with sustaining habitat that functions disproportionately in population persistence relative to its spatial extent or frequency of use. Increasingly, place-based, quantitative investigations that aim to develop solutions to landscape sustainability issues will be needed to keep pace with human-modification of rangeland and uncertainty associated with global climate change and its effects on animal populations.

Authors

Dzialak, Matthew R.; Webb, Stephen L.; Harju, Seth M.; Olson, Chad V.; Winstead, Jeffrey B.; Hayden-Wing, Larry D.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Rangeland Ecology & Management

Locations
DOI

10.2111/REM-D-11-00223.1

Using spatial statistics and point-pattern simulations to assess the spatial dependency between greater sage-grouse and anthropogenic featuresGillan, Jeffrey K.2013

Using spatial statistics and point-pattern simulations to assess the spatial dependency between greater sage-grouse and anthropogenic features

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, Monte Carlo, pair correlation function, point pattern, Ripley’s K, sage-grouse, spatial statistics

Abstract

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrastructure. Our objective was to use a spatial-statistical approach to assess the effect of roads, power transmission lines, and rural buildings on sage-grouse habitat use. We used the pair correlation function (PCF) spatial statistic to compare sage-grouse radiotelemetry locations in west-central Idaho, USA, to the locations of anthropogenic features to determine whether sage-grouse avoided these features, thus reducing available habitat. To determine significance, we compared empirical PCFs with Monte Carlo simulations that replicated the spatial autocorrelation of the sampled sage-grouse locations. We demonstrate the implications of selecting an appropriate null model for the spatial statistical analysis by comparing results using a spatially random and a clustered null model. Results indicated that sage-grouse avoided buildings by 150 m and power transmission lines by 600 m, because their PCFs were outside the bounds of a 95% significance envelope constructed from 1,000 iterations of a null model. Sage-grouse exhibited no detectable avoidance of major and minor roads. The methods used here are broadly applicable in conservation biology and wildlife management to evaluate spatial relationships between species occurrence and landscape features. Our results can directly inform planning of infrastructure and other development projects in or near sage-grouse habitat.

Authors

Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

Year Published

2013

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
DOI

10.1002/wsb.272

Saving sage-grouse from the trees: A proactive solution to reducing a key threat to a candidate speciesBaruch-Mordo, Sharon2013

Saving sage-grouse from the trees: A proactive solution to reducing a key threat to a candidate species

Keywords

Conifer encroachment; Ecological economics; Juniperus occidentalis; Proactive management; Random forest models; Sage-Grouse Initiative; Spatial wavelet analysis

Abstract

Conservation investment in management of at-risk species can be less costly than a delay-and-repair approach implemented after species receive legal protection. The United States Endangered Species Act candidate species designation represents an opportunity to implement proactive management to avoid future listing. Such efforts require substantial investments, and the challenge becomes one of optimization of limited conservation funds to maximize return. Focusing on conifer encroachment threats to greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), we demonstrated an approach that links species demographics with attributes of conservation threats to inform targeting of investments. We mapped conifer stand characteristics using spatial wavelet analysis, and modeled lek activity as a function of conifer-related and additional lek site covariates using random forests. We applied modeling results to identify leks of high management potential and to estimate management costs. Results suggest sage-grouse incur population-level impacts at very low levels of encroachment, and leks were less likely to be active where smaller trees were dispersed. We estimated costs of prevention (treating active leks in jeopardy) and restoration (treating inactive leks with recolonization potential) management across the study area (2.5 million ha) at a total of US$17.5 million, which is within the scope of landscape-level conservation already implemented. An annual investment of US$8.75 million can potentially address encroachment issues near all known Oregon leks within the next decade. Investments in proactive conservation with public and private landowners can increase ecosystem health to benefit species conservation and sustainable land uses, replace top-down regulatory approaches, and prevent conservation reliance of at-risk species.

Authors

Reese, Kerry P., Naugle, David E., Evans, Jeffrey S., Hagen, Christian A., Baruch-Mordo, Sharon, Severson, John P., Maestas, Jeremy D., Kiesecker, Joseph M. and Falkowski, Michael J.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Biological Conservation

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.biocon.2013.08.017

Forb Nutrient Density for Sage Grouse Broods in Mountain Big Sagebrush Communities, MontanaWhitehurst, William2013

Forb Nutrient Density for Sage Grouse Broods in Mountain Big Sagebrush Communities, Montana

Keywords

mountain big sagebrush, forbs, sage grouse, sage grouse brood survival, forb nutrient density, sagebrush canopy cover, sagebrush composition by weight, total digestible nutrients, crude protein, calcium, phosphorus

Abstract

Sage grouse and grazing livestock numbers have both decreased dramatically over the last half of the 20th century. Forb density is critical for preincubating sage grouse hens and survival of young broods. Although sagebrush is needed for sage grouse cover and winter feed, recommended canopy cover levels may be too high to create a forb-rich herbaceous understory. Higher forb nutrient density for breeding hens and young broods could be achieved with targeted cattle grazing and selective thinning of mature mountain big sagebrush stands.

Authors

Whitehurst, William and Marlow, Clayton

Year Published

2013

Publication

Rangelands

Locations
DOI

10.2111/RANGELANDS-D-13-00002.1

Grazing for Fuels Management and Sage Grouse Habitat Maintenance and Recovery A Case Study From Squaw Valley RanchFreese, Erica2013

Grazing for Fuels Management and Sage Grouse Habitat Maintenance and Recovery A Case Study From Squaw Valley Ranch

Keywords

wildfire, livestock, federal land, private land

Abstract

Properly applied grazing management may reduce fire frequency in annual grass–invaded sagebrush communities. Grazing can be a cost-effective tool for reducing fire potential and protecting sage grouse habitat from burning. Squaw Valley Ranch has been able to reduce fire frequency through preventive practices, which include intensive, appropriate livestock management on private lands. Publicly managed lands associated with the ranch have experienced large and frequent fires, a hindrance to improving or maintaining sage grouse habitat.

Authors

Freese, Erica, Stringham, Tamzen, Simonds, G and Sant, Eric

Year Published

2013

Publication

Rangelands

Locations
DOI

10.2111/RANGELANDS-D-13-00008.1

Additional Information:

http://srmjournals.org/doi/full/10.2111/RANGELANDS-D-13-00008.1

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin