Small

One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Territoriality and non-random mating in sage grouse, Centrocercus urophaslanus.Wiley, R.H.1973

Territoriality and non-random mating in sage grouse, Centrocercus urophaslanus.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Wiley, R.H.

Year Published

1973

Publication

Animal Behav Monogr

Locations
The strut display of male sage grouse: a 'fixed' action pattern.Wiley, R.H.1973

The strut display of male sage grouse: a 'fixed' action pattern.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Wiley, R.H.

Year Published

1973

Publication

Behaviour

Locations
Forb Nutrient Density for Sage Grouse Broods in Mountain Big Sagebrush Communities, MontanaWhitehurst, William2013

Forb Nutrient Density for Sage Grouse Broods in Mountain Big Sagebrush Communities, Montana

Keywords

mountain big sagebrush, forbs, sage grouse, sage grouse brood survival, forb nutrient density, sagebrush canopy cover, sagebrush composition by weight, total digestible nutrients, crude protein, calcium, phosphorus

Abstract

Sage grouse and grazing livestock numbers have both decreased dramatically over the last half of the 20th century. Forb density is critical for preincubating sage grouse hens and survival of young broods. Although sagebrush is needed for sage grouse cover and winter feed, recommended canopy cover levels may be too high to create a forb-rich herbaceous understory. Higher forb nutrient density for breeding hens and young broods could be achieved with targeted cattle grazing and selective thinning of mature mountain big sagebrush stands.

Authors

Whitehurst, William and Marlow, Clayton

Year Published

2013

Publication

Rangelands

Locations
DOI

10.2111/RANGELANDS-D-13-00002.1

Preference of Wintering Sage Grouse for Big SagebrushWELCH, BL1991

Preference of Wintering Sage Grouse for Big Sagebrush

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

A study determined sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) preference for 3 subspecies and 9 accessions of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.). The subspecies were mountain big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. vaseyana Rydb. Beetle), Wyoming big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle and Young), and basin big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. tridentata Nutt.). Accessions were collected at various sites in Utah and established in a uniform garden. Eleven plants for each accession or 33 plants for each subspecies were planted at random on a 2.13-m grid for a total of 99 plants. An enclosure with a top was constructed. Six birds were captured and placed in the garden. Preference was measured by the number of bites taken during the study and by estimates of percentage of leaves eaten at the end of the study. Results, by order of preference, were mountain big sagebrush, Wyoming big sagebrush, and basin big sagebrush. Within the most preferred subspecies there was distinct preference among accessions as measured by bite counts. When the forage of preferred subspecies or accessions was exhausted, the birds readily ate other subspecies or accessions.

Authors

WELCH, BL; WAGSTAFF, FJ; ROBERSON, JA

Year Published

1991

Publication

Journal of Range Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/4002745

Strutting sounds and strutting: Posturing of two Utah sage grouse populationsWelch, BL1995

Strutting sounds and strutting: Posturing of two Utah sage grouse populations

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Sound and video tape recordings and still pictures were taken of two populations of strutting male sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). The two populations studied were from the Strawberry Valley and Parker Mountains. Sixteen elements of sounds were identified in the strutting sequence. These elements were the same for both populations. Video tape and still picture analysis revealed that both populations were similar in posturing during the strutting sequence. We concluded that the Parker Mountains sage grouse population is suitable in terms of breeding display behavior to augment the Strawberry Valley population. Sexual compatibility would need to be determined in future studies.

Authors

Welch, BL; Cox, CL; Sales, TK

Year Published

1995

Publication

USDA Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Paper

Locations
SAGE GROUSE STATUS AND RECOVERY PLAN FOR STRAWBERRY VALLEY, UTAHWELCH, BL1990

SAGE GROUSE STATUS AND RECOVERY PLAN FOR STRAWBERRY VALLEY, UTAH

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Since 1939, an estimated 3,000 sage grouse in Strawberry Valley, UT, have declined to some 180 birds, mainly because of reservoir construction and eradication of big sagebrush to promote livestock forage. A 4-year study of numbers and movements of radio-tagged grouse has provided the basis for a recovery program calling for rejuvenation of big sage-brush and forbs important to grouse, replacement of mating grounds lost to human activities, consideration of sage grouse biology in management decisions, and formation of a sage grouse recovery team.

Authors

WELCH, BL; WAGSTAFF, FJ; WILLIAMS, RL

Year Published

1990

Publication

USDA Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Paper

Locations
MONOTERPENOID CONTENT OF SAGE GROUSE INGESTAWELCH, BL1989

MONOTERPENOID CONTENT OF SAGE GROUSE INGESTA

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

WELCH, BL; PEDERSON, JC; RODRIGUEZ, RL

Year Published

1989

Publication

Journal of Chemical Ecology

Locations
SELECTION OF BIG SAGEBRUSH BY SAGE GROUSEWELCH B L1988

SELECTION OF BIG SAGEBRUSH BY SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Feeding sites of wintering sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were located, one each in stands of three subspecies of big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata: ssp. tridentata, basin; ssp. vaseyana, mountain, and spp. wyomingensis. Wyoming [USA]). Evidences of differential use of plants within subspecies were observed. Whole leaves from fed-on and nonfed-on big sagebrush plants were examined for intrasubspecies chemical comparisons of crude protein, phosphorus, in vitro digestibility, and monoterpenoids. No significant differences were detected except for in vitro digestibility of Wyoming fed-on and nonfed-on big sagebrush and monoterpenoid content of basin big sagebrush. Nutritive content of all three subspecies was high, which may in part help to explain wintering sage grouse weight gains.

Authors

WELCH B L; PEDERSON J C; RODRIGUEZ R L

Year Published

1988

Publication

Great Basin Naturalist

Locations
A new species of nematode worm from the sage grouseWEHR, EVERETT E.1931

A new species of nematode worm from the sage grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Habronema urophasiana* (p. 1), Montana, from gizzard of a sage grouse, Centro-cercus urophasianus. Key to North American spp. of Habronema in birds.

Authors

WEHR, EVERETT E.

Year Published

1931

Publication

Proc U S Nation Mus

Locations
Landscape features and weather influence nest survival of a ground-nesting bird of conservation concern, the greater sage-grouse, in human-altered environments.Webb, Stephen L.2012

Landscape features and weather influence nest survival of a ground-nesting bird of conservation concern, the greater sage-grouse, in human-altered environments.

Keywords

behavior, Centrocercus urophasianus, conservation, greater sage-grouse, depredation, generalized linear mixed model, management, nest survival, weather

Abstract

Introduction: Ground-nesting birds experience high levels of nest predation. However, birds can make selection decisions related to nest site location and characteristics that may result in physical, visual, and olfactory impediments to predators. Methods: We studied daily survival rate (DSR) of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) from 2008 to 2010 in an area in Wyoming experiencing large-scale alterations to the landscape. We used generalized linear mixed models to model fixed and random effects, and a correlation within nesting attempts, individual birds, and years. Results: Predation of the nest was the most common source of nest failure (84.7%) followed by direct predation of the female (13.6%). Generally, landscape variables at the nest site (= 30 m) were more influential on DSR of nests than features at larger spatial scales. Percentage of shrub canopy cover at the nest site (15-m scale) and distances to natural gas wells and mesic areas had a positive relationship with DSR of nests, whereas distance to roads had a negative relationship with DSR of nests. When added to the vegetation model, maximum wind speed on the day of nest failure and a 1-day lag in precipitation (i.e., precipitation the day before failure) improved model fit whereby both variables negatively influenced DSR of nests. Conclusions: Nest site characteristics that reduce visibility (i.e., shrub canopy cover) have the potential to reduce depredation, whereas anthropogenic (i.e., distance to wells) and mesic landscape features appear to facilitate depredation. Last, predators may be more efficient at locating nests under certain weather conditions (i.e., high winds and moisture).

Authors

Webb, Stephen L.; Olson, Chad V.; Dzialak, Matthew R.; Harju, Seth M.; Winstead, Jeffrey B.; Lockman, Dusty

Year Published

2012

Publication

Ecological Processes

Locations
DOI

10.1186/2192-1709-1-4

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin