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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Greater sage-grouse population response to energy development and habitat lossWalker, Brett L.2007

Greater sage-grouse population response to energy development and habitat loss

Keywords

agriculture, centrocercus urophasianus, coal-bed methane, coal-bed natural gas, energy development, greater sage-grouse, lek count, population, Powder River Basin, sagebrush

Abstract

Modification of landscapes due to energy development may alter both habitat use and vital rates of sensitive wildlife species. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, have experienced rapid, widespread changes to their habitat due to recent coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development. We analyzed lek-count, habitat, and infrastructure data to assess how CBNG development and other landscape features influenced trends in the numbers of male sage-grouse observed and persistence of leks in the PRB. From 2001 to 2005, the number of males observed on leks in CBNG fields declined more rapidly than leks outside of CBNG. Of leks active in 1997 or later, only 38% of 26 leks in CBNG fields remained active by 2004-2005, compared to 84% of 250 leks outside CBNG fields. By 2005, leks in CBNG fields had 46% fewer males per active lek than leks outside of CBNG. Persistence of 110 leks was positively influenced by the proportion of sagebrush habitat within 6.4 km of the lek. After controlling for habitat, we found support for negative effects of CBNG development within 0.8 km and 3.2 km of the lek and for a time lag between CBNG development and lek disappearance. Current lease stipulations that prohibit development within 0.4 km of sage-grouse leks on federal lands are inadequate to ensure lek persistence and may result in impacts to breeding populations over larger areas. Seasonal restrictions on drilling and construction do not address impacts caused by loss of sagebrush and incursion of infrastructure that can affect populations over long periods of time. Regulatory agencies may need to increase spatial restrictions on development, industry may need to rapidly implement more effective mitigation measures, or both, to reduce impacts of CBNG development on sage-grouse populations in the PRB.

Authors

Walker, Brett L.; Naugle, David E.; Doherty, Kevin E.

Year Published

2007

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2006-529

From the field: Outbreak of West Nile virus in greater sage-grouse and guidelines for monitoring, handling, and submitting dead birdsWalker, BL2004

From the field: Outbreak of West Nile virus in greater sage-grouse and guidelines for monitoring, handling, and submitting dead birds

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, emerging infectious disease, greater sage-grouse, lek count, Montana, population decline, Powder River Basin, survival, West Nile virus, Wyoming

Abstract

West Nile virus (WNV) resulted in a 25% decline in survival in four populations of radiomarked greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) across Alberta, Wyoming, and Montana in 2003. Unexpected impacts of WNV are disturbing because range-wide habitat loss and degradation already threaten sage-grouse populations. In the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana, late-summer survival of sage-grouse was lower at a site with confirmed WNV mortalities (20%) than at two sites without (76%). Dramatic declines in both male and female lek attendance at the WNV site the following spring suggest that outbreaks may threaten some local populations with extirpation. The key to understanding broader impacts of WNV on sage-grouse is to monitor additional populations and to determine whether populations infected in 2003 are again impacted this year. To facilitate this process, we describe a strategy for monitoring WNV mortality in the field and provide information on how to handle, store, and submit dead birds for testing.

Authors

Walker, BL; Naugle, DE; Doherty, KE; Cornish, TE

Year Published

2004

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
DOI

10.2193/0091-7648(2004)032[1000:FTFOOW]2.0.CO;2

Sage Grouse Nest Locations in Relation to LeksWAKKINEN, WL1992

Sage Grouse Nest Locations in Relation to Leks

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We tested 2 predictions about the locations of nests of lek-forming species to evaluate a guideline developed to protect sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nesting habitat. Sage grouse (n = 37) in southeastern Idaho did not attempt to nest midway between leks, as 1 hypothesis suggests. Neither was there evidence indicating that areas surrounding a lek are important for nesting, as a second hypothesis suggests. Because distribution of sage grouse nests was random with respect to lek location, nesting habitat protection based on either hypothesis affords no special protection for nests.

Authors

WAKKINEN, WL; REESE, KP; CONNELLY, JW

Year Published

1992

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3808838

AN IMPROVED SPOTLIGHTING TECHNIQUE FOR CAPTURING SAGE GROUSEWAKKINEN, WL1992

AN IMPROVED SPOTLIGHTING TECHNIQUE FOR CAPTURING SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

WAKKINEN, WL; REESE, KP; CONNELLY, JW; FISCHER, RA

Year Published

1992

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
THE ENERGETIC COST OF DISPLAY IN MALE SAGE GROUSEVEHRENCAMP, SL1989

THE ENERGETIC COST OF DISPLAY IN MALE SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

VEHRENCAMP, SL; BRADBURY, JW; GIBSON, RM

Year Published

1989

Publication

Animal Behaviour

Locations
Determinants of threatened sage grouse in northeastern Nevada.van Kooten, G. Cornelis2007

Determinants of threatened sage grouse in northeastern Nevada.

Keywords

population viability analysis, endangered species, sage grouse

Abstract

We examined potential human determinants of observed declines in greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations in Elko County, Nevada. Although monitoring of sage grouse has occurred for decades, monitoring levels have not been consistent. This article contributes to the literature by normalizing grouse counts by the annual effort to count them, performing regression analyses to explain the resulting normalized data, and correcting for sample selectivity bias that arises from years when counts were not taken. Our findings provide some evidence that cattle-grazing contributes to a reduction in sage grouse populations, but this result should be interpreted with caution because our data do not include indications about the timing and precise nature of grazing practices. Annual variations in weather appear to be a major determinant after statistically controlling for human interactions with the landscape, suggesting that climate change is a key potential long-run threat to this species.

Authors

van Kooten, G. Cornelis; Eagle, Alison J.; Eiswerth, Mark E.

Year Published

2007

Publication

Human Dimensions of Wildlife

Locations
DOI

10.1080/10871200601107908

Early brood-rearing habitat use and productivity of greater sage-grouse in WyomingThompson, Kristin M.2006

Early brood-rearing habitat use and productivity of greater sage-grouse in Wyoming

Keywords

Greater Sage-Grouse, early brood rearing, Centrocercus urophasianus, habitat, productivity, sagebrush, invertebrate, forb

Abstract

Populations of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have been declining throughout their range since the 1960s. Productivity, which includes production and survival of young, is often cited as a factor in these declines. We monitored radio-equipped Greater Sage-Grouse at 3 sites in western Wyoming to assess early brood-rearing habitat use (through 14 days post-hatch) and productivity. Logistic and linear regression analyses with Akaike's Information Criterion were used to evaluate early brooding habitat use and to examine relationships between productivity and vegetation, insect size and abundance, and weather parameters. Females with broods were found in areas with greater sagebrush canopy and grass cover, and fewer invertebrates compared to random areas. The number of juveniles per female (estimated from wing barrel collections during fall harvest) was positively related to the abundance of medium-length Hymenoptera and grass cover, and the proportion of females with confirmed chicks 14 days post-hatch was positively related to abundance of medium-length Coleoptera and total herbaceous cover. Although the specific parameters varied slightly, Greater Sage-Grouse productivity in Wyoming appeared to be associated with a combination of insect and herbaceous cover elements. Managing for abundant and diverse insect communities within dense protective sagebrush stands should help ensure high-quality early brood-rearing habitat and increased Greater Sage-Grouse productivity.

Authors

Thompson, Kristin M.; Holloran, Matthew J.; Slater, Steven J.; Kuipers, Jarren L.; Anderson, Stanley H.

Year Published

2006

Publication

Western North American Naturalist

Locations
DOI

10.3398/1527-0904(2006)66[332:EBHUAP]2.0.CO;2

Using gas chromatography to determine winter diets of greater sage-grouse in UtahThacker, Eric T.2012

Using gas chromatography to determine winter diets of greater sage-grouse in Utah

Keywords

Artemisia; black sagebrush; Centrocercus urophasianus; gas chromatography; Utah; winter diet; Wyoming sagebrush

Abstract

Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) constitutes the majority (>99%) of sage-grouse (Centrocercus spp.) winter diets. Thus, identification and protection of important winter habitats is a conservation priority. However, not all sagebrush may be alike. More information is needed regarding sage-grouse sagebrush winter dietary preferences for application to management. The objective of our research was to determine if chemical analysis of fecal pellets could be used to characterize winter sage-grouse diets as a substitute for more invasive methods. We collected and analyzed fecal pellets and sagebrush samples from 29 different sage-grouse flock locations in northwestern and southcentral Utah. Using gas chromatography, we were able to identify crude terpene profiles that were unique to Wyoming sagebrush (A. tridentata wyomingensis) and black sagebrush (A. nova). We subsequently used the profiles to determine sagebrush composition of sage-grouse fecal pellets, thus reflecting sage-grouse winter diets. This technique provides managers with a tool to determine which species or subspecies of sagebrush may be important in the winter diets of sage-grouse populations. (c) 2011 The Wildlife Society.

Authors

Thacker, Eric T.; Gardner, Dale R.; Messmer, Terry A.; Guttery, Michael R.; Dahlgren, Dave K.

Year Published

2012

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.1002/jwmg.273

A COMPARATIVE BEHAVIORAL STUDY OF THREE GREATER SAGE-GROUSE POPULATIONSTaylor, SE2006

A COMPARATIVE BEHAVIORAL STUDY OF THREE GREATER SAGE-GROUSE POPULATIONS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We compared male strut behavior of the genetically distinct Lyon, Nevada/Mono, California Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population with that of two proximal populations: Nye, Nevada, and Lassen, California. We measured strut rates and nine acoustic components of the strut display in all three populations. Male strut rates did not differ among populations. Acoustic components of the Lyon/Mono and Lassen populations were similar, whereas the Nye population was distinct. The genetically distinct Lyon/ Mono population was more similar behaviorally to the Nye population than the genetically similar Nye and Lassen populations were to each other. Overall, the Lyon/Mono population did not exhibit detectable differences in male strut behavior. Reproductive isolation through sexual selection does not appear to have occurred in the Lyon/Mono population.

Authors

Taylor, SE; Young, JR

Year Published

2006

Publication

The Wilson Journal of Ornithology

Locations
DOI

10.1676/1559-4491(2006)118[0036:ACBSOT]2.0.CO;2

Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus migration links the USA and Canada: a biological basis for international prairie conservationTack, Jason D.2012

Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus migration links the USA and Canada: a biological basis for international prairie conservation

Keywords

Keywords Canada, Centrocercus urophasianus, greatersage-grouse, migration, Near Threatened species, prairie,transboundary conservation, USA

Abstract

Migratory pathways in North American prairies are critical for sustaining endemic biodiversity. Fragmentation and loss of habitat by an encroaching human footprint has extirpated and severely truncated formerly large movements by prairie wildlife populations. Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus, a Near Threatened landscape species requiring vast tracts of intact sagebrush Artemisia spp., exhibit varied migratory strategies across their range in response to the spatial composition of available habitats. We unexpectedly documented the longest migratory event ever observed in sage-grouse (> 120 km one way) in 2007-2009 while studying demography of a population at the north-east edge of their range. Movements that encompassed 6,687 km(2) included individuals using distinct spring and summer ranges and then freely intermixing on the winter range in what is probably an obligate, annual event. The fate of greater sage-grouse in Canada is in part dependent on habitat conservation in the USA because this population spans an international border. Expanding agricultural tillage and development of oil and gas fields threaten to sever connectivity for this imperilled population. Science can help delineate high priority conservation areas but the fate of landscapes ultimately depends on international partnerships implementing conservation at scales relevant to prairie wildlife.

Authors

Tack, Jason D.; Naugle, David E.; Carlson, John C.; Fargey, Pat J.

Year Published

2012

Publication

Oryx

Locations
DOI

10.1017/S003060531000147X

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin