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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Decrease of sage grouse Centrocerus urophasianus after ploughing of sagebrush steppeSWENSON, JE1987

Decrease of sage grouse Centrocerus urophasianus after ploughing of sagebrush steppe

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

The effects on wildlife of ploughing sagebrush Artemisia spp. steppe have been little studied. From 1973 to 1984, numbers of lekking male sage grouse Centrocerus urophasianus declined by 73% in a study area of south central Montana, 16% of which was ploughed by 1984. The proportion of ploughed wintering areas increased from 10% in 1975 to 30% in 1984. In contrast, numbers of lekking male sage grouse on a nearby unploughed control area showed no clear long-term trend. Ploughing even small areas of sagebrush steppe to produce cereal grains appears more detrimental to sage grouse than chemical control of sagebrush.

Authors

SWENSON, JE; SIMMONS, CA; EUSTACE, CD

Year Published

1987

Publication

Biological Conservation

Locations
DOI

10.1016/0006-3207(87)90115-7

Differential Survival by Sex in Juvenile Sage Grouse and Gray PartridgeSWENSON, JE1986

Differential Survival by Sex in Juvenile Sage Grouse and Gray Partridge

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Studies of Capercaillie Tetrao urogallus and Black Grouse T. tetrix in Northern Eu- rope have found that juvenile males of these sexually size dimorphic species suffer higher mortality than juvenile females during adverse conditions. This difference may be due to the more rapid growth rates among males. Differences in the juvenile survi- val of the dimorphic Sage Grouse Centrocercus urophasianus and the monomorphic Gray Partridge Perdix perdix were studied in western North America. Juvenile male Sage Grouse survive less well than juvenile females during years unfavorable for ju- venile survival and in poorer habitats. Juvenile male Gray Partridge showed little or no such trend. These results are consistent with those obtained in the European stud- ies. Pressures of sexual selection may have led to a growth rate in juvenile males of highly dimorphic grouse species which is near the upper limit of that which can be sustained by their ecological niche

Authors

SWENSON, JE

Year Published

1986

Publication

Ornis Scandinavica

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3676747

Nesting Habitat Selection by Sage Grouse in South-Central WashingtonSveum, CM1998

Nesting Habitat Selection by Sage Grouse in South-Central Washington

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

To characterize western sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus phaios Bonaparte) nesting habitat in sagebrush-steppe habitat in Washington, we initiated a study on the Yakima Training Center to determine nesting habitat characteristics and whether these characteristics differed between successful and depredated nests. Most nests (71%) were in big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata Nutt.)/bunchgrass communities. Nest habitat was characterized by greater shrub cover, shrub height, vertical cover height, residual cover, and litter than at random locations, Successful 1-m(2) nest sites within big sagebrush/bunchgrass in 1992 had less shrub cover (51%) and shrub height (64 cm) than depredated nest sites (70% and 90 cm, respectively). Successful 77-m(2) nest areas in big sagebrush/bunchgrass in 1993 had more tall grass (greater than or equal to 18 cm) than depredated nest areas. Management that protects the big sagebrush/bunchgrass community is essential for maintaining nesting habitat for sage grouse.

Authors

Sveum, CM; Edge, WD; Crawford, JA

Year Published

1998

Publication

Journal of Range Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/4003409

Use and selection of brood-rearing habitat by Sage Grouse in south central WashingtonSveum, CM1998

Use and selection of brood-rearing habitat by Sage Grouse in south central Washington

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) brood-habitat use was examined during 1992 and 1993 at the Yakima Training Center in Yakima and Kittitas counties, Washington. During the 2 yr we followed 38 broods, of which 12 persisted to 1 August ((x) over bar = approximately 1.5 chicks/brood). Food forb cover was greater at all brood locations than at random locations. Hens with broods in big sagebrush/bunchgrass habitat (Artemisia tridentata/Agropyron spicatum) selected for greater food forb cover, total forb cover, and lower shrub heights; broods in altered big sagebrush/bunchgrass habitats selected greater tall grass cover and vertical cover height; broods in grassland showed no preference for any measured vegetation characteristics. During the early rearing period (post-hatching-6 wk) each year, broods selected sagebrush/bunchgrass. Broods in 1993 made greater use of grasslands than in 1992 and selected grassland during the late brood-rearing period (7-12 wk). Broods selected for sagebrush/bunchgrass during midday, but 52% of brood locations in the afternoon were in grassland. Tall grass cover was greater at morning (0500-1000 h) and afternoon (1501-2000 h) brood locations than at midday (1001-1500 h) and random locations. Midday brood locations had greater shrub cover and height than morning and afternoon locations. Selection of habitat components was similar to the results of other studies, but habitat conditions coupled with a possible lack of alternate brood-rearing cover types resulted in low survival of chicks.

Authors

Sveum, CM; Crawford, JA; Edge, WD

Year Published

1998

Publication

Great Basin Naturalist

Locations
Polygyny and female breeding failure reduce effective population size in the lekking Gunnison sage-grouseStiver, Julie R.2008

Polygyny and female breeding failure reduce effective population size in the lekking Gunnison sage-grouse

Keywords

Lek; Reproductive success; Variance; Mating system; Centrocercus

Abstract

Populations with small effective sizes are at risk for inbreeding depression and loss of adaptive potential. Variance in reproductive success is one of several factors reducing effective population size (N-e) below the actual population size (N). Here, we investigate the effects of polygynous (skewed) mating and variation in female breeding success on the effective size of a small population of the Gunnison sage-grouse (Centrocercus minimus), a ground nesting bird with a lek mating system. During a two-year field study, we recorded attendance of marked birds at leks, male mating success, the reproductive success of radio-tagged females, and annual survival. We developed simulations to estimate the distribution of male reproductive success. Using these data, we estimated population size ((N) over cap) and effective population size N-e for the study population. We also simulated the effects of population size, skewed vs. random mating, and female breeding failure on N-e. In our study population, the standardized variance in seasonal reproductive success was almost as high in females as in males, primarily due to a high rate of nest failure (73%). Estimated N-e (42) was 19% of (N) over cap in our population, below the level at which inbreeding depression is observed in captive breeding studies. A high hatching failure rate (28%) was also consistent with ongoing inbreeding depression. In the simulations, N-e was reduced by skewed male mating success, especially at larger population sizes, and by female breeding failure. Extrapolation of our results suggests that six of the seven extant populations of this species may have effective sizes low enough to induce inbreeding depression and hence that translocations may be needed to supplement genetic diversity. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Authors

Stiver, Julie R.; Apa, Anthony D.; Remington, Thomas E.; Gibson, Robert M.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Biological Conservation

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.biocon.2007.10.018

Multi-scale assessment of greater sage-grouse fence collision as a function of site and broad scale factorsStevens, Bryan S.2012

Multi-scale assessment of greater sage-grouse fence collision as a function of site and broad scale factors

Keywords

avian collisionCentrocercus urophasianusfence managementgreater sage-grouseIdahoinfrastructure collisionmodeling collision risk

Abstract

Previous research in Europe and North America suggested grouse are susceptible to collision with infrastructure, and anecdotal observation suggested greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) fence collision in breeding habitats may be prevalent. However, no previous research systematically studied greater sage-grouse fence collision in any portion of their range. We used data from probability-based sampling of fences in greater sage-grouse breeding habitats of southern Idaho, USA, to model factors associated with collision at microsite and broad spatial scales. Site-scale modeling suggested collision may be influenced by technical attributes of fences, with collisions common at fence segments absent wooden fence posts and with segment widths >4?m. Broad-scale modeling suggested relative probability of collision was influenced by region, a terrain ruggedness index (TRI), and fence density per square km. Conditional on those factors, collision counts were also influenced by distance to nearest active sage-grouse lek. Our models provide a conceptual framework for prioritizing sage-grouse breeding habitats for collision mitigation such as fence marking or moving, and suggest mitigation in breeding habitats should start in areas with moderate-high fence densities (>1?km/km2) within 2?km of active leks. However, TRI attenuated other covariate effects, and mean TRI/km2 >10?m nearly eliminated sage-grouse collision. Thus, our data suggested mitigation should focus on sites with flat to gently rolling terrain. Moreover, site-scale modeling suggested constructing fences with larger and more conspicuous wooden fence posts and segment widths <4?m may reduce collision. (c) 2012 The Wildlife Society.

Authors

Stevens, Bryan S.; Connelly, John W.; Reese, Kerry P.

Year Published

2012

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.1002/jwmg.397

Survival and Detectability Bias of Avian Fence Collision Surveys in Sagebrush SteppeStevens, Bryan S.2011

Survival and Detectability Bias of Avian Fence Collision Surveys in Sagebrush Steppe

Keywords

carcass survival; Centrocercus urophasianus; detectability; fence collisions; Idaho; sagebrush; sage-grouse; scavenging

Abstract

We used female ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) carcasses as surrogates for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) to study factors influencing survival and detection bias associated with avian fence collision surveys in southern Idaho, USA, during spring 2009. We randomly placed 50 pheasant carcasses on each of 2 study areas, estimated detection probability during fence-line surveys, and monitored survival and retention of carcasses and their associated sign over a 31-day period. Survival modeling suggested site and habitat features had little impact on carcass survival, and constant survival models were most supported by the data. Model averaged carcass daily survival probability was low on both study areas and ranged from 0.776 to 0.812. Survival of all carcass sign varied strongly by location, and the top sign survival model included a site effect parameter. Model averaged daily survival probability for collision sign on the 2 study sites ranged from 0.863 to 0.988 and varied between sites. Logistic regression modeling indicated detection probability of carcasses during fence-line surveys for avian collision victims was influenced by habitat type and microsite shrub height at the carcass location. Carcasses located in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) habitats were detected at a lower rate (0.36) than carcasses in little (A. arbuscula) and black sagebrush (A. nova) habitats (0.71). Increasing shrub height at the carcass location from the little sagebrush mean of 16.5 cm to the big sagebrush mean of 36.0 cm reduced detection probability by approximately 30%. Avian fence collision surveys in sagebrush-steppe habitats should be conducted at <= 2-week sampling intervals to reduce the impact of survival bias on collision rate estimates. Two-week sampling intervals may be too long in areas with low carcass and sign survival, therefore survival rates should be estimated on all study areas to determine the appropriate sampling interval duration. Researchers should be aware of the effects of local vegetation on detection probabilities, and methods to correct detection probabilities based on collision site attributes should be applied to ensure more accurate collision rate estimates. Additionally, caution should be used when aggregating or comparing uncorrected collision data from areas with differing vegetation, as detection probabilities are likely different between sites. (C) 2011 The Wildlife Society.

Authors

Stevens, Bryan S.; Reese, Kerry P.; Connelly, John W.

Year Published

2011

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.1002/jwmg.53

Greater sage-grouse and fences: Does marking reduce collisions?Stevens, B.S.2012

Greater sage-grouse and fences: Does marking reduce collisions?

Keywords

avian collisionCentrocercus urophasianuscollision mitigationfence managementgreater sage-grouseIdahoinfrastructure markingprairie-grouse

Abstract

Collision with infrastructure such as fences is widespread and common for many species of grouse. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) fence-collision has been documented and fence-marking methods have been recommended for mitigating prairie-grouse collision in rangeland habitats. We tested a marking method in greater sage-grouse breeding habitat and modeled collision as a function of fence marking and control covariates, in Idaho (USA) in 2010. Our results suggested collision risk decreased with fence marking, increased with lek-count indices of local abundance, and decreased with increasing distance from lek. We found an approximate 83% reduction in collision rates at marked fences relative to unmarked fences. Our results also suggested marking may not be necessary on all fences, and mitigation should focus on areas with locally abundant grouse populations and fence segments <500 m from large leks and moving or removing fences may be necessary in some areas if management is to eliminate collision

Authors

STEVENS, B. S., REESE, K. P., CONNELLY, J. W. & MUSIL, D. D.

Year Published

2012

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
DOI

10.1002/wsb.142

Redescription of Eimeria centrocerci from Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)STABLER, RM1981

Redescription of Eimeria centrocerci from Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus)

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Eimeria centrocerci was found in the droppings from two of 153 sage grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, from Moffat County, Colorado. Because Simon's (1939, 1940) figures are not clear and the description is ambiguous, a redescription of E. centrocerci from the sage grouse is presented.

Authors

STABLER, RM; KITZMILLER, NJ; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1981

Publication

Transactions of The American Microscopical Society

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3225788

HEMATOZOA IN SAGE GROUSE FROM COLORADOSTABLER, RM1977

HEMATOZOA IN SAGE GROUSE FROM COLORADO

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Blood films from 361 sage grouse (Ccnlroccrcus urophasianus) from North Park, Colorado, were examined for hematozoa. Parasites found were: Plasmodium pedioecetii, Haemoproteus canacbzitcs, Leucocytozoon bonasae, Trypanosoma avium, and microfilariae. The sage grouse represents a new host record for Plasmodium. Prevalence of parasitism was not age or sex related, with no significant (P > 0.05) differences between age or sex class. Parasite burdens increased significantly (P< 0.05) from January through May. As these burdens rose prior to the emergence of potential vectors, probably it was a true relapse associated with the resumption of the hosts? sexual activity.

Authors

STABLER, RM; BRAUN, CE; BECK, TDI

Year Published

1977

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Diseases

Locations

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin