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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
LEK BEHAVIOR IN CAPTIVE SAGE GROUSE CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUSSPURRIER, MF1994

LEK BEHAVIOR IN CAPTIVE SAGE GROUSE CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

SPURRIER, MF; BOYCE, MS; MANLY, BFJ

Year Published

1994

Publication

Animal Behaviour

Locations
Evaluating lek occupancy of Greater Sage-Grouse in relation to landscape cultivation in the DakotasSmith, JT2005

Evaluating lek occupancy of Greater Sage-Grouse in relation to landscape cultivation in the Dakotas

Keywords

Greater Sage-Grouse, lek, North Dakota, satellite imagery, South Dakota.

Abstract

Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have been declining in many states and provinces of North America, and North and South Dakota hold no exception to these declines. We studied effects of cultivated land on Greater Sage-Grouse lek abandonment in North and South Dakota. Landscape-level data were assessed using satellite imagery within a geographic information system. Comparisons were made of 1972-1976 and 1999-2000 pet-cent cultivated and noncultivated land. These comparisons were made between land uses surrounding active leks versus inactive leks, active leks versus random locations, and abandoned regions versus active regions. The 1999-2000 imagery illustrated that percent Cultivated land was greater near abandoned leks (4-km buffers) than near active leks in North Dakota or random sites, but this did not hold true in South Dakota. Comparison of an extensive region of abandoned leks with a region of active leks in North Dakota illustrated a similar increase as well as dispersion of cultivation within the abandoned region. However, 1972-1976 imagery revealed that this relationship between percentage of cultivated land and lek activity in North Dakota has been static over the last 30 years. Thus, if the decline of Greater Sage-Grouse is the result of cultivated land infringements, it occurred prior to 1972 in North Dakota.

Authors

Smith, JT; Flake, LD; Higgins, KF; Kobriger, GD; Homer, CG

Year Published

2005

Publication

Western North American Naturalist

Locations
Microhabitat characteristics relative to lek abandonment by greater sage grouse in the DakotasSmith, Joe T.2006

Microhabitat characteristics relative to lek abandonment by greater sage grouse in the Dakotas

Keywords

Artemisia spp, Centrocercus urophasianus, greater sage-grouse, lek, Montana, North Dakota, sagebrush, South Dakota

Abstract

We compared peripheral microhabitat characteristics to identify possible reasons for greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) lek abandonment in North Dakota and South Dakota. Comparisons of active leks in the Dakotas were made with active leks in eastern Montana. We systematically selected 12 sample sites at equidistant points from each other within 1.5 km of the lek center. Only non-tilled areas were sampled, but tillage generally comprised < 5 percent of sample sites and was evaluated in a separate landscape-level study. We detected no differences (P > 0.10) between sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover or density around active leks compared to the same attributes around historically active but now inactive leks in North and South Dakota. However, big sagebrush (A. tridentata) height, forb cover, and bare ground were greater (P < 0.10) around active leks compared to inactive leks in North Dakota. The area within 1.5 km of active leks in eastern Montana had much greater (P < 0.10) cover and density of sagebrush than active leks in either North or South Dakota. Sagebrush characteristics, i.e., coverage, density, and height, peripheral to active leks in the western Dakotas appeared desirable for sage grouse nesting sites compared to nesting habitat described in other areas of more classic habitat in Montana or Idaho. The substantial forb and grass cover association with marginal sagebrush coverage in the Dakotas apparently provides adequate nesting and brood rearing habitat.

Authors

Smith, Joe T.; Flake, Lester D.; Higgins, Kenneth F.; Kobriger, Gerald D.

Year Published

2006

Publication

Intermountain Journal of Sciences

Locations
History of greater sage-grouse in the Dakotas: Distribution and population trendsSmith, Joe T.2004

History of greater sage-grouse in the Dakotas: Distribution and population trends

Keywords

active, lek, Centrocercus urophasianus, greater sage-grouse, North Dakota, South Dakota

Abstract

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) has declined throughout its range and its status is of major concern to federal, state, and provincial wildlife agencies. We collected information on current and historical greater sage-grouse distribution and lek activity in western North and South Dakota. A steady decline in lek attendance by males occurred over the entire recorded period in North Dakota (1951-2002) and South Dakota (1972-2002). There was no apparent change in numbers of known active leks due to discovery of new leks, but there was an abandonment of regions once occupied by active leks.

Authors

Smith, Joe T.; Flake, Lester D.; Higgins, Kenneth F.; Kobriger, Gerald D.

Year Published

2004

Publication

Prairie Naturalist

Locations
Effectiveness of Raptor Perch Deterrents on an Electrical Transmission Line in Southwestern WyomingSlater, Steven J.2010

Effectiveness of Raptor Perch Deterrents on an Electrical Transmission Line in Southwestern Wyoming

Keywords

Aquila chrysaetos, behavior, Centrocercus urophasianus, golden eagle, greater sage-grouse, perch deterrents, power lines, raptors, Wyoming

Abstract

In sagebrush steppe and other open habitats, power lines can provide perches for raptors and other birds in areas where few natural perches previously existed, with potential negative impacts for nearby prey species, such as greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Between September 2006 and August 2007, we used driving surveys, behavioral-observation surveys, and prey-remains surveys to assess the ability of perch-deterrent devices to minimize raptor and common raven (Corvus corax) activity on a recently constructed transmission line in southwestern Wyoming. All survey methods demonstrated that activity was significantly lower on the deterrent line compared with a nearby control line; however, deterrent devices did not entirely prevent perching. Considering use of cross-arms or pole-tops alone, we sighted 42 raptors and ravens on the deterrent line and 551 on the control line during 192 driving surveys of each line. Golden eagles (Aquila chrysaelos) and ravens were the species most commonly observed successfully overcoming deterrent devices. Smaller rough-legged hawks (Buteo lagopus) regularly avoided deterrents by perching on conductors (i.e., wires). We documented much off-line activity near both survey lines and suggest that fewer birds near the deterrent line likely reflected reduced availability of nearby alternate perches. There was a pronounced winter peak in on-line perch use, with the effect more evident on the control line. Behavior surveys corroborated our driving-survey results but were otherwise unproductive. During 549 prey-remains surveys of each line, we found 9 single and 60 grouped prey items near deterrent-line poles, compared with 277 single and 467 grouped items near control-line poles. We observed few sage-grouse in the study area but did witness a likely power line related, raptor-caused sage-grouse mortality. Overall, our results suggest that perch-deterrent devices can reduce raptor and raven activity on power-line structures, but to determine their utility on entire power-line segments, we suggest managers consider 1) what level of reduction in perch activity is worth the cost, and 2) the availability of alternate perches in the surrounding landscape.

Authors

Slater, Steven J.; Smith, Jeff P.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2008-525

Mating performance of the Sage Grouse.Simon, J. R.1940

Mating performance of the Sage Grouse.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Mating behavior of the Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was observed on April 5-8, 1940 near Skully Point, about 11 miles south of Kemmerer, Wyoming. A blind was found impractical but an automobile proved satisfactory for an observation point, not interfering with the activities of the birds. Car lights were off and men silent by 5 A.M. and, although before dawn, [male][male] were on the strutting ground in full progress with courtship display but [female][female] could not be observed until shortly after 5. About 300 cocks and 80 hens were present on the area, 200 yards wide and 1/4 mile long. Each cock stood 25-40 feet from his neighbor; sometimes they fought, mostly with wing-beating. Hens, in groups of 6 to 32, moved about the grounds and were kept grouped by 8-10 [male][male]. Most of the mating activity took place between 5 and 8 A.M. Strutting was confined to areas about 5 ft. in diam. The strut started with raising and spreading the wings, spreading the tail and raising the long black plumes on the back of the neck, followed by inflation of the large air sacs so that bare bulbs of yellowish breast skin showed. Then the birds walked forward, with head high, tossing the head and breast regions upward and forward 3 times, also mantling the head with white breast and neck feathers. Deflation of the air-sacs resulted in a bumping or plopping. Many photographs were presented showing these steps. Coition seemed to occur only on invitation from the [female]. It required 6-12 seconds. One [male] was observed to mate with 3 hens. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: L. H. Walkinshaw

Authors

Simon, J. R.

Year Published

1940

Publication

The Auk: Ornithological Advances

Locations
Cheilospirura centrocerci, a New Nematode from the Sage Grouse Centrocercus urophasianusSIMON, FELIX1939

Cheilospirura centrocerci, a New Nematode from the Sage Grouse Centrocercus urophasianus

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

SIMON, FELIX

Year Published

1939

Publication

Transactions of The American Microscopical Society

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3222651

A new cestode Raillietina centrocerci, from the sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus.Simon, F.1937

A new cestode Raillietina centrocerci, from the sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Simon, F.

Year Published

1937

Publication

Transactions of The American Microscopical Society

Locations
Influence of wind speed on sage grouse metabolismSHERFY, MH1995

Influence of wind speed on sage grouse metabolism

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We measured the effect of wind speed on the metabolic rate of six adult sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) with indirect respiration calorimetry at ambient temperatures above, near, and below the lower critical temperature. There was a significant effect (P < 0.05) of temperature on metabolic rate at all wind speeds, and a significant effect (P < 0.05) of wind speed on metabolic rate for temperatures less than or equal to 0 degrees C. Wind speed had a more pronounced effect on metabolism at temperatures below the lower critical temperature for sage grouse. Metabolic rates measured at wind speeds of greater than or equal to 1.5 m/s were significantly higher than those measured at wind speeds < 1.5 m/s. Multiple regression analysis of wind speed (u; m/s) and temperature (T-a; degrees C) on metabolism (MR; mL O-2 . g(-1). h(-1)) yielded the equation MR = 0.0837 (u) - 0.0248 (T-a) + 0.5444. The predicted cost of thermoregulation at conditions of -5 degrees C and u = 1.5 mis was about 1.5 x standard metabolic rate; half the increase was due to wind. Measurements of wind speed in sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) stands indicate that such habitat effectively reduces wind speed to < 1.5 m/s. Microhabitat value should be recognized in the management of sagebrush stands.

Authors

SHERFY, MH; PEKINS, PJ

Year Published

1995

Publication

Canadian Journal of Zoology

Locations
DOI

10.1139/z95-088

THE INFLUENCE OF SEASON, TEMPERATURE, AND ABSORPTIVE STATE ON SAGE GROUSE METABOLISMSHERFY, MH1994

THE INFLUENCE OF SEASON, TEMPERATURE, AND ABSORPTIVE STATE ON SAGE GROUSE METABOLISM

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We used indirect respiration calorimetry to measure the metabolism of six adult sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) during winter, spring, and summer. During winter the metabolic rate of fed birds was higher (P < 0.05) than that of fasted birds. The standard metabolic rate (SMR) of females (0.692 mL O-2.g(-1).h(-1)) was higher than of males (0.583 mL O-2.g(-1).h(-1)) in winter; in both sexes SMR was higher in winter than in summer. Females' SMR was lower (P = 0.0001) in spring than in winter. Lower critical temperatures of both males and females were substantially lower in winter (-0.6 degrees C, -4.8 degrees C) than in summer (14.9 degrees C, 14.8 degrees C). Although seasonally elevated, the SMR of sage grouse in winter is low in comparison with that of other galliforms with northern distributions. Thermoregulation during a winter night at -10 degrees C would result in minimal (<5%) expenditure of endogenous reserves by either sex. Thermoregulation and SMR in winter are more energetically costly to female sage grouse than to males, and may necessitate increased behavioral thermoregulation by females. Seasonal change in SMR differs between the sexes, and is probably influenced by the energetic demands of the breeding season.

Authors

SHERFY, MH; PEKINS, PJ

Year Published

1994

Publication

Canadian Journal of Zoology-Revue Canadienne De Zoologie

Locations

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin