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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Microsatellite analysis of female mating behaviour in lek-breeding sage grouse (vol 10, pg 2043, 2001)Semple, KE2002

Microsatellite analysis of female mating behaviour in lek-breeding sage grouse (vol 10, pg 2043, 2001)

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Semple, KE; Wayne, RK; Gibson, RM

Year Published

2002

Publication

Molecular Ecology

Locations
Microsatellite analysis of female mating behaviour in lek-breeding sage grouseSemple, K2001

Microsatellite analysis of female mating behaviour in lek-breeding sage grouse

Keywords

lek mating; microsatellite DNA; paternity; sexual selection; sage grouse

Abstract

We used microsatellite DNA markers to genotype chicks in 10 broods of lek-breeding sage grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, whose mothers' behaviour was studied by radiotracking and observing leks. Previous behavioural studies suggested that almost all matings are performed by territorial males on leks and that multiple mating is rare. Two broods (20%) were sired by more than one male. Genetic analyses of the broods of eight females that visited an intensively studied lek were consistent with behavioural observations. Four females observed mating produced singly sired broods and males other than the individual observed copulating were excluded as sires for most or all of their chicks. Territorial males at the study lek were excluded as sires of broods of four other females that visited the lek but were not observed mating there. Radio-tracking suggested that two of these females mated at other leks. Our results confirm the reliability of mating observations at leks, but do not rule out a possible unseen component of the mating system.

Authors

Semple, K; Wayne, RK; Gibson, RM

Year Published

2001

Publication

Molecular Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1046/j.0962-1083.2001.01348.x

Effect of harvest on sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus populations: what can we learn from the current data?Sedinger, JS2005

Effect of harvest on sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus populations: what can we learn from the current data?

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, exploitation, harvest, population dynamics, sage-grouse

Abstract

Understanding the impact of human harvest is fundamental to the effective management of many wildlife populations. Such understanding has been elusive because harvest mortality may compensate for other sources of mortality when the mortality process is density dependent. This problem is exacerbated by the ubiquitous positive con-elation between harvest regulations and population size: more harvest is allowed when populations are larger. Connelly et al. (2003) studied the impact of harvest regulations on sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus using three sets of regulations: closed season, 1 -bird bag and seven-day season, 2-bird bag and 23-day season. Connelly et al. (2003) reported a generally negative correlation between harvest regulations and increase in number of males on leks for harvest regulations that ranged from a hunting closure to a 23-day season with a 2-bird bag. Because lek sizes were smaller where hunting was closed there was confounding between harvest and population density, making it difficult to distinguish harvest effects from those of population density. Based on a simple simulation the apparent effects of harvest on change in population size observed by Connelly et al. (2003) could be produced entirely by density-dependent phenomena. Additionally, lambda (finite rate of population increase) was greater in areas with more restrictive harvest regulations. lambda is a ratio of Nt+1 to N-t, however, and there is a negative sampling covariance between lambda and N-t; we expect lambda to be larger when N-t is smaller based purely on this statistical fact. The study by Connelly et al. (2003) is an important attempt to study effects of harvest on population dynamics of sage-grouse. We do not argue that either additive mechanisms in survival or compensatory mechanisms in survival or reproduction influence the relationship between harvest and population dynamics of sage-grouse, but that correlation between population size and harvest regulations, combined with statistical issues make it impossible to distinguish between these two hypotheses in Connelly et al. (2003).

Authors

Sedinger, JS; Rotella, JJ

Year Published

2005

Publication

Wildlife Biology

Locations
DOI

10.2981/0909-6396(2005)11[371:EOHOSC]2.0.CO;2

Assessing Compensatory Versus Additive Harvest Mortality: An Example Using Greater Sage-Grouse.SEDINGER, JAMES S.2010

Assessing Compensatory Versus Additive Harvest Mortality: An Example Using Greater Sage-Grouse.

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus;compensatory harvest;exploitation;Markov chain Monte Carlo;survival

Abstract

We used band-recovery data from 2 populations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), one in Colorado, USA, and another in Nevada, USA, to examine the relationship between harvest rates and annual survival. We used a Seber parameterization to estimate parameters for both populations. We estimated the process correlation between reporting rate and annual survival using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods implemented in Program MARK. If hunting mortality is additive to other mortality factors, then the process correlation between reporting and survival rates will be negative. Annual survival estimates for adult and juvenile greater sage-grouse in Nevada were 0.42 ± 0.07 (x ¯ ± SE) for both age classes, whereas estimates of reporting rate were 0.15 ± 0.02 and 0.16 ± 0.03 for the 2 age classes, respectively. For Colorado, average reporting rates were 0.14 ± 0.016, 0.14 ± 0.010, 0.19 ± 0.014, and 0.18 ± 0.014 for adult females, adult males, juvenile females, and juvenile males, respectively. Corresponding mean annual survival estimates were 0.59 ± 0.01, 0.37 ± 0.03, 0.78 ± 0.01, and 0.64 ± 0.03. Estimated process correlation between logit-transformed reporting and survival rates for greater sage-grouse in Colorado was ? = 0.68 ± 0.26, whereas that for Nevada was ? = 0.04 ± 0.58. We found no support for an additive effect of harvest on survival in either population, although the Nevada study likely had low power. This finding will assist mangers in establishing harvest regulations and otherwise managing greater sage-grouse populations.

Authors

SEDINGER, JAMES S., GARY C. WHITE, SHAWN ESPINOSA, ED T. PARTEE and CLAIT E. BRAUN.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-071

Mating behavior of the Sage Grouse.Scott, J. W.1942

Mating behavior of the Sage Grouse.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Scott, J. W.

Year Published

1942

Publication

The Auk: Ornithological Advances

Locations
Changes in the distribution and abundance of sage grouse in Washington.Schroeder, Michael A.2000

Changes in the distribution and abundance of sage grouse in Washington.

Keywords

Sage grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, abundance, distribution, shrub-steppe, survey, Washington habitat fragementation

Abstract

Sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) historically occurred in shrub-steppe and meadow-steppe communities throughout much of eastern Washington. The decline in distribution has been dramatic; 73% of 67 lek complexes documented since 1960 are currently vacant. Many vacant lek complexes (53%) are in areas where sage grouse have been recently extirpated. The current range is about 8% of the historic range, occurring in 2 relatively isolated areas. Based on changes in number of males counted on lek complexes, the sage grouse population size in Washington declined at least 77% from 1960 to 1999; the 1999 spring population was estimated to be about 1,100 birds. Historic and recent declines of sage grouse are linked to conversion of native habitat for production of crops and degradation of the remaining native habitat. Although declines in populations of sage grouse appear to be slowing, the small size and isolated nature of the 2 remaining populations may be a long-term problem. Management should be directed toward protecting, enhancing, expanding, and connecting the existing populations.

Authors

Schroeder, Michael A.; Hays, David W.; Livingston, Michael F.; Stream, Leray E.; Jacobson, John E.; Pierce, D. John

Year Published

2000

Publication

Northwestern Naturalist

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3536821

Unusually High Reproductive Effort by Sage Grouse in a Fragmented Habitat in North-Central WashingtonSchroeder, MA1997

Unusually High Reproductive Effort by Sage Grouse in a Fragmented Habitat in North-Central Washington

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, clutch size, life history, nesting, productivity, renesting, Sage Grouse

Abstract

Productivity of Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was studied in north-central Washington during 1992-1996. Nest timing and success, clutch size, probability of nesting and renesting, and variation associated with age and year were examined for 84 females monitored with the aid of radio telemetry. Although date of nest initiation varied annually, yearling females (hatched in previous year) consistently nested later than adults; mean date of initiation of incubation was 22 April overall. The average nest contained 9.1 eggs and was incubated for 27 days. Clutch size was smaller for renests than for first nests; clutch size also varied annually. Although the overall rate of nest success was only 36.7%, all females apparently nested at least once, and at least 87.0% of females renested following predation of their first nests. As a result of renesting, annual breeding success was estimated as 61.3%. Percent of all females that produced a brood at least 50 days old was 49.5%; at least 33.4% of 515 chicks survived greater than or equal to 50 days following hatch. Although the rates of nesting and renesting appear to have been under-estimated in other studied populations, Sage Grouse in north-central Washington display more reproductive effort overall; they lay more eggs and are more likely to nest and renest.

Authors

Schroeder, MA

Year Published

1997

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1370144

Fidelity of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus to breeding areas in a fragmented landscapeSchroeder, MA2003

Fidelity of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus to breeding areas in a fragmented landscape

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, fidelity, greater sage-grouse, landscape fragmentation, lek visitation, nesting success, Washington

Abstract

In this paper, we report on breeding site fidelity for a small, localized population of greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus inhabiting a highly altered and fragmented landscape in north-central Washington, USA. One hundred sixteen greater sage-grouse were captured, fitted with radio transmitters and monitored during 1992-1998. Of 19 males captured as adults and nine captured as yearlings, one and four, respectively, were observed visiting two different leks. Of 78 females, 24 were observed visiting at least two leks, and eight visited at least three leks. Although the incidence of multiple lek visitation was similar to what has been reported for other regions, the average of 10.2 km distance between neighbouring leks was substantially further in north-central Washington. Average distance between a female's first nest and her renest was higher for yearlings (6.3 km) than for adults (2.0 km). Successful females moved an average of 1.6 km and unsuccessful females moved 5.2 km to nest in subsequent years. Most distances between consecutive nests were < 3.0 km, but some females, including adults, moved > 20 km. These data suggest that fidelity of greater sage-grouse to nesting areas in north-central Washington is substantially lower than has been found for other populations. Although the relationship between behaviour of greater sage-grouse and regional habitat fragmentation is a possible explanation for these observations, we were not able to detect a correlation between fidelity and local habitat availability.

Authors

Schroeder, MA; Robb, LA

Year Published

2003

Publication

Wildlife Biology

Locations
Sarcocystis rileyi in Sage GrouseSALT, WR1958

Sarcocystis rileyi in Sage Grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

SALT, WR

Year Published

1958

Publication

The Journal of Parasitology

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3274418

Greater sage-grouse as an umbrella species for sagebrush-associated vertebratesRowland, MM2006

Greater sage-grouse as an umbrella species for sagebrush-associated vertebrates

Keywords

Conservation planning; Great Basin; Habitat risk; Greater sage-grouse; Sagebrush ecosystem; Umbrella species

Abstract

Widespread degradation of the sagebrush ecosystem in the western United States, including the invasion of cheatgrass, has prompted resource managers to consider a variety of approaches to restore and conserve habitats for sagebrush-associated species. One such approach involves the use of greater sage-grouse, a species of prominent conservation interest, as an umbrella species. This shortcut approach assumes that managing habitats to conserve sage-grouse will simultaneously benefit other species of conservation concern. The efficacy of using sage-grouse as an umbrella species for conservation management, however, has not been fully evaluated. We tested that concept by comparing: (1) commonality in land-cover associations, and (2) spatial overlap in habitats between sage-grouse and 39 other sagebrush-associated vertebrate species of conservation concern in the Great Basin ecoregion. Overlap in species' land-cover associations with those of sage-grouse, based on the p (phi) correlation coefficient, was substantially greater for sagebrush obligates ((x) over bar = 0.40) than non-obligates ((x) over bar = 0.21). Spatial overlap between habitats of target species and those associated with sage-grouse was low (mean phi = 0.23), but somewhat greater for habitats at high risk of displacement by cheatgrass (mean phi = 0.33). Based on our criteria, management of sage-grouse habitats likely would offer relatively high conservation coverage for sagebrush obligates such as pygmy rabbit (mean phi = 0.84), but far less for other species we addressed, such as lark sparrow (mean phi = 0.09), largely due to lack of commonality in land-cover affinity and geographic ranges of these species and sage-grouse. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Authors

Rowland, MM; Wisdom, MJ; Suring, LH; Meinke, CW

Year Published

2006

Publication

Biological Conservation

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.biocon.2005.10.048

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin