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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Antelope, sage grouse, and Neotropical migrants.Rothwell, Reg.1993

Antelope, sage grouse, and Neotropical migrants.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Rothwell, Reg.

Year Published

1993

Publication

U S Forest Service

Locations
PREDATION OF ARTIFICIAL SAGE GROUSE NESTS IN TREATED AND UNTREATED SAGEBRUSHRITCHIE, ME1994

PREDATION OF ARTIFICIAL SAGE GROUSE NESTS IN TREATED AND UNTREATED SAGEBRUSH

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We measured predation on 120 artificial Sage Grouse (Centrarcus urophasianus) nests in montane sagebrush grassland in northern Utah. We examined nests in areas that had been chained and seeded 25 years previously (treated areas) and in areas that were untreated. Predation rates of artificial nests were higher in areas of untreated sagebrush, even though these areas had greater sagebrush cover, taller shrubs, and greater horizontal plant cover. These results differ from those previously hypothesized for treated sagebrush habitat and may reflect a greater abundance of other potential prey species, especially lagomorphs, in untreated areas that attracted greater densities of predators. In addition, over 80% of nests were depredated by mammals, which hunt using olfaction and are less likely than avian predators to be affected by nest cover. We conclude that, after treated sagebrush has recovered to some degree, predation rates of Sage Grouse nests may be lower in treated sagebrush. Consequently, factors other than nest predation (e.g., winter food, thermal cover, insects, perennial forb abundance) may be more important reasons for preserving mature sagebrush stands for Sage Grouse.

Authors

RITCHIE, ME; WOLFE, ML; DANVIR, R

Year Published

1994

Publication

Great Basin Naturalist

Locations
Fire Effects on Cover and Dietary Resources of Sage-Grouse HabitatRhodes, Edward C.2010

Fire Effects on Cover and Dietary Resources of Sage-Grouse Habitat

Keywords

arthropods; bunchgrass; forbs; Oregon; prescribed burning; sage-grouse; Wyoming big sagebrush

Abstract

We evaluated 6 years of vegetation response following prescribed fire in Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata spp. wyomingensis) steppe on vegetation cover, productivity, and nutritional quality of forbs preferred by greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), and abundance of common arthropod orders. Habitat cover (shrubs and tall herbaceous cover [>18 cm ht]) was about 50% lower after burning compared to unburned controls because of the loss of sagebrush. Perennial grasses and an invasive annual forb, pale alyssum (Alyssum alyssoides), increased in cover or yield after fire. There were no increases in yield or nutritional quality of forb species important in diets of sage-grouse. Abundance of ants (Hymenoptera), a significant component in the diet of young sage-grouse, decreased after fire. These results suggest that prescribed fire will not improve habitat characteristics for sage-grouse in Wyoming big sagebrush steppe where the community consists of shrubs, native grasses, and native forbs.

Authors

Rhodes, Edward C.; Bates, Jonathan D.; Sharp, Robert N.; Davies, Kirk W.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-143

CARCASS COMPOSITION AND ENERGY RESERVES OF SAGE GROUSE DURING WINTERREMINGTON, TE1988

CARCASS COMPOSITION AND ENERGY RESERVES OF SAGE GROUSE DURING WINTER

Keywords

Sage Grouse; carcass composition; Centrocercus urophasianus; Colorado; fat content; energy reserves; winter

Abstract

Carcass composition of Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was measured to assess the size and variation of energy reserves during winter in North Park, Colorado. Fat content ranged from 0.8 to 8.4%. Adults had higher (P=0.001) fat content than yearlings (4.7 v. 2.9%); birds collected in 1982 had more (P<0.05) when diethyl ether, rather than petroleum ether, was used as a solvent (4.0 v. 3.6%). Fat comprised 85 to 93% of estimated energy reserves which equaled 9.6, 5.1, 7.0, and 5.3 times standard metabolic rate for adult and yearling males and adult and yearling females, respectively. All age and sex classes gained or maintained weight and fat over winter. Relatively small energy reserves of Sage Grouse are probably most important during breeding and nesting activities.

Authors

REMINGTON, TE; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1988

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1368427

SAGE GROUSE FOOD SELECTION IN WINTER, NORTH-PARK, COLORADOREMINGTON, TE1985

SAGE GROUSE FOOD SELECTION IN WINTER, NORTH-PARK, COLORADO

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Selection of sagebrush by sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was investigated during winters 1980-81 and 1981-82 in North Park, Colorado. Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis) composed 90% of browsed plants but only 48% of plants at random sites. Mountain big sagebrush (A. t. ssp. vaseyana) and alkali sagebrush (A. longiloba) composed 7 and 3%, and 12 and 2% of browsed plants and plants at random sites, respectively. Wyoming big sagebrush leaves contained more crude protein and lower levels of monoterpenes than mountain big sagebrush. Plants browsed by grouse contained more protein than unbrowsed or random plants. Plant vigor and crude protein levels discriminated among browsed, unbrowsed, and random Wyoming big sagebrush samples in a discriminant function anal- ysis. Crude protein and three oxygenated monoterpenes discriminated between browsed and unbrowsed mountain big sagebrush samples in a discriminant function analysis

Authors

REMINGTON, TE; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1985

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3801395

Nest site characteristics and factors affecting nest success of greater sage-grouse.Rebholz, James L.2009

Nest site characteristics and factors affecting nest success of greater sage-grouse.

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, greater sage-grouse, nesting habitat, nest success, Nevada, radiotelemetry

Abstract

Nesting success of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) influences annual reproductive success and population dynamics. To describe nesting habitat and measure the effects of vegetation characteristics on nesting outcomes, we sampled 87 sage-grouse nests during 2004 and 2005 in the Montana Mountains of northwestern Nevada. Within a 78.5-m2 circular plot surrounding each nest, we quantified sagebrush canopy cover and grass cover. We used Akaike's Information Criterion to rank competing models describing potential relationships between vegetation characteristics at and surrounding sage-grouse nests and to determine those characteristics associated with nest success. Nest initiation rate was high (90.0%) and apparent nest success was 40.2%. We used a Mayfield estimation to determine a probability of nest success (hatch >=1 chick) of 36%. Grass cover within a 3-m2 area centered on the nest had a positive effect on nest success (odds ratio: 1.03, 95% CI: 1.005 [long dash] 1.059). We also found weak support for a positive effect on nest success of sagebrush cover at the nest (odds ratio: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.993 [long dash] 1.043). Our results are similar to previous findings and confirm the importance of sagebrush cover and herbaceous understory for nesting. To manage sagebrush communities for successful nesting by greater sage-grouse, we recommend providing sufficient grass and sagebrush cover.

Authors

Rebholz, James L.; Robinson, W. Douglas; Pope, Michael D.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Open Ornithology Journal

Locations
Availability of Foods of Sage Grouse Chicks following Prescribed Fire in Sagebrush-BitterbrushPyle, WH1996

Availability of Foods of Sage Grouse Chicks following Prescribed Fire in Sagebrush-Bitterbrush

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

A study was conducted to determine the influence of prescribed fire on the availability of primary foods of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus Bonaparte) chicks at Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge, Lake County, Ore, from 1987 to 1989. Responses of certain primary foods and general food categories to fire were evaluated in sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana Beetle)-bitterbrush (Purshia tridentata Pursh.) communities with a randomized block design established in stands where shrub cover exceeded 35%. Within blocks, habitat response was evaluated far 2 growing seasons on 4 plots used as controls, 3 plots burned in November 1987, and 4 plots burned in March 1988. Fall burning increased (P < 0.05) frequency of taxa in the dandelion tribe (Cichoriene). Other primary foods, including microsteris (Microsteris gracilis Hook.), desert-parsley (Lomatium spp. Raf.), and ground-dwelling beetles (Scarabaeidae, Tenebrionidae) were not influenced by burning. Spring and fall burning increased (P < 0.05) total forb cover and diversity, but decreased (P < 0.05) sagebrush cover. Prescribed fire may increase the supply of forbs available to sage grouse in montane sagebrush habitats used for brood-rearing where shrubs dominate stands at the expense of the herbaceous component.

Authors

Pyle, WH; Crawford, JA

Year Published

1996

Publication

Journal of Range Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/4002590

Raptor and Corvid Response to Power Distribution Line Perch Deterrents in UtahPrather, Phoebe R.2010

Raptor and Corvid Response to Power Distribution Line Perch Deterrents in Utah

Keywords

avian predators, Centrocercus minimus, corvids, Gunnison sage-grouse, mitigation, perch deterrents, power distribution lines, raptors, Utah

Abstract

Increased raptor and corvid abundance has been documented in landscapes fragmented by man-made structures, such as fence posts and power lines. These vertical structures may enhance raptor and corvid foraging and predation efficiency because of increased availability of perch, nesting, and roosting sites. Concomitantly, vertical structures, in particular power distribution lines, have been identified as a threat to sage-grouse (Centrocercus spp.) conservation. To mitigate potential impacts of power distribution lines on sage-grouse and other avian species, the electrical power industry has retrofitted support poles with perch deterrents to discourage raptor and corvid use. No published information is available regarding efficacy of contemporary perch deterrents on avian predator use of lower-voltage power distribution lines. We evaluated efficacy of 5 perch deterrents mounted on support poles of an 11-km section of a 12.5-kV distribution line that bisected occupied Gunnison sage-grouse (Centrocercus minimus) habitat in southeastern Utah, USA. Perch deterrents were mounted on the line in November-December 2006 following a random replicated block design that included controls. During 168 hours and 84 hours of direct observation in 2007 and 2008, respectively, we recorded 276 and 139 perching events of 7 potential avian predators of sage-grouse. Golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) were the dominant species we recorded during both years. We did not detect any difference in perching events by perch deterrent we evaluated and controls (P < 0.05). Perch deterrents we evaluated were not effective because of inherent design and placement flaws. Additionally, previous pole modifications that mitigated avian electrocutions provided alternative perches. We did not record any raptor or corvid electrocutions or direct predation on Gunnison sage-grouse. The conclusions of this study can be applied by conservation groups and power companies to future management of power distribution lines within areas inhabited by species sensitive to man-made vertical structures.

Authors

Prather, Phoebe R.; Messmer, Terry A.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2009-204

Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus nesting success and habitat use in northeastern CaliforniaPopham, GP2003

Greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus nesting success and habitat use in northeastern California

Keywords

Artemisia tridentata wyomingensis, California, Centrocercus urophasianus, Galliformes, greater sage-grouse, nest site selection, radio-telemetry

Abstract

From mid-March through mid-August 1998-2000, we studied greater sage-grouse Centrocercus urophasianus nesting habitat in northeastern California, USA. We located nest sites of 45 radio-marked hens, which had an average nest success of 40.2%. The radio-marked grouse used low sagebrush Artemisia arbuscula cover type less than expected; big sagebrush A. tridentata wyomingensis and mixed shrub cover types were used in proportion to their availability. Grouse used sites with habitat characteristics similar to random sites for nesting. However, successful nests differed from unsuccessful nests in several respects. Mean distance between nest and lek was greater for successful nests ((x) over bar = 3,588 m, SE = 811 m, N = 20) than for unsuccessful nests ((x) over bar = 1,964 m, SE = 386 m, N = 20). Rock cover was greater at successful nests ((x) over bar = 27.7%, SE = 4.6%) than at unsuccessful nests ((x) over bar = 14.49%, SE = 3.04%). Total shrub height was greater at successful nests ((x) over bar = 65.5 cm, SE = 4.7) than at unsuccessful nests ((x) over bar = 49.2 cm, SE = 1.7). The height of visual obstruction was greater at successful nests ((x) over bar = 40.2 cm, SE = 2.6) than at unsuccessful nests ((x) over bar = 32.5 cm, SE = 2.0). Our results suggest that sage-grouse use more diverse vegetation than previously reported, and we conclude that either this represents a natural behaviour for sage-grouse in this area, or we observed a selection response to a landscape altered by human activity.

Authors

Popham, GP; Gutierrez, RJ

Year Published

2003

Publication

Wildlife Biology

Locations
THE FOOD HABITS AND SUMMER DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE SAGE GROUSE IN CENTRAL MONTANAPETERSON J G1970

THE FOOD HABITS AND SUMMER DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE SAGE GROUSE IN CENTRAL MONTANA

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

The food habits of juvenile sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were studied in central Montana during the summers of 1966 and 1968. Forbs averaged 75 percent of the diet of 127 juveniles through 12 weeks of age. The flower buds and leaves of common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) and common salsify (Tragopogon dubius) were the most highly preferred and utilized forbs, comprising 25 and 15 percent of the diets, respectively. Other forbs commonly utilized were prairie pepperweed (Lepidium densiflorum), prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), curlcup gumweed (Grindelia squarrosa), and fringed sagewort (Artemisia frigida). Big sagebrush (A. tridentata) received little use until the birds were 11 weeks old. Insect use declined steadily from a high of 60 percent of the diet in 1-week chicks to 5 percent in 12-week-old juveniles. Observed brood locations, after chicks were 2-3 weeks old, were less frequent on the sagebrush-grassland benches and more frequent on lower areas until, by September, the majority of broods were located on bottomlands. Sagebrush, 6-18 inches high, was most prevalent at brood sites used during morning and evening activity periods. Important components of juvenile sage grouse habitat in this area appear to be an abundance and diversity of forbs and densities of sagebrush ranging from 1-20 percent.

Authors

PETERSON J G

Year Published

1970

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3799502

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin