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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Two Hybrid Sage Grouse × Sharp-Tailed Grouse from Central MontanaENG, RL1971

Two Hybrid Sage Grouse × Sharp-Tailed Grouse from Central Montana

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

ENG, RL

Year Published

1971

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1366684

Total plasma protein and renesting by greater sage-grouseGregg, MA2006

Total plasma protein and renesting by greater sage-grouse

Keywords

age, blood chemistry, Centrocercus urophasianus, dietary protein, greater sage-grouse, maternal condition, nest initiation date, nest predation, nutrition, renesting, total plasma protein

Abstract

Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population declines have been attributed to reduced productivity. Although renesting by sage-grouse may contribute significantly to annual productivity during some years, little information is available on this aspect of sage-grouse reproductive ecology. We investigated the relationship between total plasma protein, age of hen, time of first nest initiation, and time of first nest loss on occurrence of renesting. We captured, assigned age, extracted blood, and radiomarked prelaying, female sage-grouse on 4 study areas during 1999-2004. We monitored radiomarked females from mid-April through June to identify period of nest initiation (early, mid, or late), nest loss (early or late), and renesting activity. We only considered hens that were available to renest (n = 143) for analysis, and we censored those that nested successfully or died during their first nest attempt. Depredation and abandonment accounted for 85% (122/143) and 15% (21/143) of the unsuccessful first nests, respectively. The proportion of hens renesting was 34% (48/143) across all study areas and years. Akaike's Information Criterion model selection indicated that occurrence of renesting varied by age, nest initiation period, nest loss period, and total plasma protein. The best model had low predictive power for any given hen (r(2) = 0.296), but validation of the best model indicated that our predictor variables were important for distinguishing renesting status and likely explained substantial temporal and spatial variation in renesting rates. A greater proportion of adults than yearlings renested, and hens that nested early in the nesting season and lost nests early during incubation were the most likely to renest. Hens that renested had greater total plasma protein levels than non-renesting hens independent of age, nest initiation period, and nest loss period. Because sage-grouse depend on exogenous sources of protein for reproduction, land management practices that promote high-quality, prelaying hen habitat could increase dietary protein intake and sage-grouse renesting rates.

Authors

Gregg, MA; Dunbar, MR; Crawford, JA; Pope, MD

Year Published

2006

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/0022-541X(2006)70[472:TPPARB]2.0.CO;2

TOPOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF SAGE GROUSE FORAGING IN WINTERHUPP, JW1989

TOPOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF SAGE GROUSE FORAGING IN WINTER

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We studied sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) exposure above snow and topographic distribution of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) foraging sites in winter (Jan-Mar) in the Gunnison Basin, Colorado. Sage grouse feeding activity (n = 157 foraging sites) was not proportionally distributed among 5 topographic categories (P < 0.001). Most (46 and 75% of foraging sites in 1985 and 1986, respectively) feeding activity occurred in drainages and on slopes with south or west aspects. Use of slopes with north or east aspects was less than expected. Distribution of sage grouse feeding activity was influenced by topographic variation in snow depth and mountain big sagebrush (A. tridentata vaseyana) exposure above snow. During a severe winter in 1984, <10% of the sagebrush vegetation in the Gunnison Basin was exposed above snow and available to sage grouse. During milder winters in 1985 and 1986, exposure of sagebrush was 84 and 79%, respectively. We recommend that sagebrush be maintained in drainages and on slopes with south or west aspects.

Authors

HUPP, JW; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1989

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3809220

Timing of Vegetation Sampling at Greater Sage-Grouse Nests.Hausleitner, Doris2005

Timing of Vegetation Sampling at Greater Sage-Grouse Nests.

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus ; Colorado ; nest site selection ; nest initiation

Abstract

Habitat management guidelines for greater sage-grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, have been formulated, in part, based on studies of nest site selection. However, these guidelines may not represent conditions when the female initiates nesting because sampling occurs posthatch (> 30 days after nest initiation) to avoid disturbing incubating females. In 2002, we investigated differences in 22 habitat variables at initiation and hatch. Sampling was at 30 randomly selected active nests marked in 2001. There was no significant difference in structural or cover data (P > 0.05). Grass height and percent grass cover differed (P < 0.05) based on timing of sampling. Grass heights at the nest bowl and at 1 m from the edge of the nest bowl were 10 and 9 cm at initiation and 16 and 13 cm at hatch, respectively. Percent grass cover increased from 4% to 6% cover from initiation to hatch. Sampling occurred in a dry year; differences in grass heights and percent cover may be more pronounced in years of normal precipitation. Preliminary results indicated current habitat sampling techniques conducted posthatching adequately described selection of structural components of shrub height, visual obstruction, and percent cover of shrubs, bare ground, litter, and forbs at the nest site at initiation. Data need to be verified for other study areas and under different climatic conditions.

Authors

Doris Hausleitner, Kerry P Reese, Anthony D Apa

Year Published

2005

Publication

Rangeland Ecology & Management

Locations
DOI

10.2111/04-170R2.1

Thresholds and Time Lags in Effects of Energy Development on Greater Sage-Grouse PopulationsHarju, Seth M.2010

Thresholds and Time Lags in Effects of Energy Development on Greater Sage-Grouse Populations

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, energy development, greater sage-grouse, lek count, threshold

Abstract

Rapid expansion of energy development in some portions of the Intermountain West, USA, has prompted concern regarding impacts to declining greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations. We used retrospective analyses of public data to explicitly investigate potential thresholds in the relationship between lek attendance by male greater sage-grouse, the presence of oil or gas wells near leks (surface occupancy), and landscape-level density of well pads. We used generalized linear models and generalized estimating equations to analyze data on peak male attendance at 704 leks over 12 years in Wyoming, USA. Within this framework we also tested for time-lag effects between development activity and changes in lek attendance. Surface occupancy of oil or gas wells adjacent to leks was negatively associated with male lek attendance in 5 of 7 study areas. For example, leks that had >= 1 oil or gas well within a 0.4-km (0.25-mile) radius encircling the lek had 35-91% fewer attending males than leks with no well within this radius. In 2 of these 5 study areas, negative effects of well surface occupancy were present out to 4.8 km, the largest radius we investigated. Declining lek attendance was also associated with a higher landscape-level density of well pads; lek attendance at well-pad densities of 1.54 well pads/km(2) (4 well pads/mile(2)) ranged from 13% to 74% lower than attendance at unimpacted leks (leks with zero well pads within 8.5 km). Lek attendance at a well-pad density of 3.09 well pads/km(2) (8 well pads/mile(2)) ranged from 77% to 79% lower than attendance at leks with no well pad within 8.5 km. Further, our analysis of time-lag effects suggested that there is a delay of 2-10 years between activity associated with energy development and its measurable effects on lek attendance. These results offer new information for consideration by land managers on spatial and temporal associations between human activity and lek attendance in sage-grouse, and suggest that regional variation is an important consideration in refining existing management strategies.

Authors

Harju, Seth M.; Dzialak, Matthew R.; Taylor, Renee C.; Hayden-Wing, Larry D.; Winstead, Jeffrey B.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2008-289

The use of western harvester ant mounds as strutting locations by sage grouse.Geizentanner, K.I.1974

The use of western harvester ant mounds as strutting locations by sage grouse.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Geizentanner, K.I.; Clark, W.H.

Year Published

1974

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
The strut display of male sage grouse: a 'fixed' action pattern.Wiley, R.H.1973

The strut display of male sage grouse: a 'fixed' action pattern.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Wiley, R.H.

Year Published

1973

Publication

Behaviour

Locations
The secret sex lives of sage-grouse: multiple paternity and intraspecific nest parasitism revealed through genetic analysisBird, Krista L.2013

The secret sex lives of sage-grouse: multiple paternity and intraspecific nest parasitism revealed through genetic analysis

Keywords

lek, multiple paternity, nest parasitism, paternity, polygyny, sage-grouse

Abstract

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and females mating with multiple individuals). We found that most clutches had a single father and mother, but there was evidence of multiple paternity and intraspecific nest parasitism. Annually, most males fathered only one brood, very few males fathered multiple broods, and the proportion of all sampled males in the population fathering offspring averaged 45.9%, suggesting that more males breed in Alberta than previously reported for the species. Twenty-six eggs (2.2%) could be traced to intraspecific nest parasitism and 15 of 191 clutches (7.9%) had multiple fathers. These new insights have important implications on what we know about sexual selection and the mating structure of lekking species.

Authors

Bird, Krista L.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Carpenter, Jennifer E.; Paszkowski, Cynthia A.; Boyce, Mark S.; Coltman, David W.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Behavioral Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1093/beheco/ars132

The Sage Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianusBurnett, L. E.1905

The Sage Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Burnett, L. E.

Year Published

1905

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
DOI

10.2307/1361386

THE RED QUEEN VISITS SAGE GROUSE LEKSBOYCE, MS1990

THE RED QUEEN VISITS SAGE GROUSE LEKS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

BOYCE, MS

Year Published

1990

Publication

American Zoologist

Locations

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin