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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
A note on the food of sage grouse in the Madeline Plains area of CaliforniaLEACH, HOWARD R.1958

A note on the food of sage grouse in the Madeline Plains area of California

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Eighty-five sage grouse stomachs were collected September 3-4, 1955 from hunter-killed birds. Of the total volume of food, 98.2% was vegetable origin and 1.8% was animal. Flowers and buds of Lactuca scariola made up 50%, and Artemisia tridentata leafage and flowers amounted to 31.6% of the total. The bulk of animal food consisted of ants. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: C. M. Ferrel

Authors

LEACH, HOWARD R.; BROWNING, BRUCE M.

Year Published

1958

Publication

California Fish And Game

Locations
A new species of nematode worm from the sage grouseWEHR, EVERETT E.1931

A new species of nematode worm from the sage grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Habronema urophasiana* (p. 1), Montana, from gizzard of a sage grouse, Centro-cercus urophasianus. Key to North American spp. of Habronema in birds.

Authors

WEHR, EVERETT E.

Year Published

1931

Publication

Proc U S Nation Mus

Locations
A new cestode Raillietina centrocerci, from the sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus.Simon, F.1937

A new cestode Raillietina centrocerci, from the sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Simon, F.

Year Published

1937

Publication

Transactions of The American Microscopical Society

Locations
A Method for Obtaining Sage Grouse Age and Sex Ratios from WingsENG, ROBERT L.1955

A Method for Obtaining Sage Grouse Age and Sex Ratios from Wings

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

247 sage grouse wings from birds of known sex and/or age were used in establishing aging and sexing criteria. Depending on the molt stage of the bird, age determination is based on the condition of the outer two primaries or the difference in length between primaries 8 and 9. Sex determination is based on the length of individual primaries. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: R. L. Eng

Authors

ENG, ROBERT L.

Year Published

1955

Publication

The Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3796862

A Landscape Approach for Ecologically Based Management of Great Basin ShrublandsWisdom, Michael J.2009

A Landscape Approach for Ecologically Based Management of Great Basin Shrublands

Keywords

cheatgrass; disturbance; resistance; sagebrush; Sage-grouse; woodlands

Abstract

Native shrublands dominate the Great Basin of western of North America, and most of these communities are at moderate or high risk of loss from non-native grass invasion and woodland expansion. Landscape-scale management based on differences in ecological resistance and resilience of shrublands can reduce these risks. We demonstrate this approach with an example that focuses on maintenance of sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitats for Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a bird species threatened by habitat loss. The approach involves five steps: (1) identify the undesired disturbance processes affecting each shrubland community type; (2) characterize the resistance and resilience of each shrubland type in relation to the undesired processes; (3) assess potential losses of shrublands based on their resistance, resilience, and associated risk; (4) use knowledge from these steps to design a landscape strategy to mitigate the risk of shrubland loss; and (5) implement the strategy with a comprehensive set of active and passive management prescriptions. Results indicate that large areas of the Great Basin currently provide Sage-grouse habitats, but many areas of sagebrush with low resistance and resilience may be lost to continued woodland expansion or invasion by non-native annual grasses. Preventing these losses will require landscape strategies that prioritize management areas based on efficient use of limited resources to maintain the largest shrubland areas over time. Landscape-scale approaches, based on concepts of resistance and resilience, provide an essential framework for successful management of arid and semiarid shrublands and their native species.

Authors

Wisdom, Michael J.; Chambers, Jeanne C.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Restoration Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1111/j.1526-100X.2009.00591.x

A Currency for Offsetting Energy Development Impacts: Horse-Trading Sage-Grouse on the Open MarketDoherty, Kevin E.2010

A Currency for Offsetting Energy Development Impacts: Horse-Trading Sage-Grouse on the Open Market

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Background: Biodiversity offsets provide a mechanism to compensate for unavoidable damages from new energy development as the U. S. increases its domestic production. Proponents argue that offsets provide a partial solution for funding conservation while opponents contend the practice is flawed because offsets are negotiated without the science necessary to backup resulting decisions. Missing in negotiations is a biologically-based currency for estimating sufficiency of offsets and a framework for applying proceeds to maximize conservation benefits.Methodology/Principal Findings: Here we quantify a common currency for offsets for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) by estimating number of impacted birds at 4 levels of development commonly permitted. Impacts were indiscernible at 1-12 wells per 32.2 km(2). Above this threshold lek losses were 2-5 times greater inside than outside of development and bird abundance at remaining leks declined by -32 to -77%. Findings reiterated the importance of time-lags as evidenced by greater impacts 4 years after initial development. Clustering well locations enabled a few small leks to remain active inside of developments.Conclusions/Significance: Documented impacts relative to development intensity can be used to forecast biological tradeoffs of newly proposed or ongoing developments, and when drilling is approved, anticipated bird declines form the biological currency for negotiating offsets. Monetary costs for offsets will be determined by true conservation cost to mitigate risks such as sagebrush tillage to other populations of equal or greater number. If this information is blended with landscape level conservation planning, the mitigation hierarchy can be improved by steering planned developments away from conservation priorities, ensuring compensatory mitigation projects deliver a higher return for conservation that equate to an equal number of birds in the highest priority areas, provide on-site mitigation recommendations, and provide a biologically based cost for mitigating unavoidable impacts.

Authors

Doherty, Kevin E.; Naugle, David E.; Evans, Jeffrey S.

Year Published

2010

Publication

PLOS One

Locations
DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0010339

A comparison of sample types varying in invasiveness for use in DNA sex determination in an endangered population of greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus uropihasianus)Bush, KL2005

A comparison of sample types varying in invasiveness for use in DNA sex determination in an endangered population of greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus uropihasianus)

Keywords

DNA extraction, endangered species, noninvasive samples, Sage-Grouse, sex determination

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Bush, KL; Vinsky, MD; Aldridge, CL; Paszkowski, CA

Year Published

2005

Publication

Conservation Genetics

Locations
DOI

10.1007/s10592-005-9040-6

A COMPARATIVE BEHAVIORAL STUDY OF THREE GREATER SAGE-GROUSE POPULATIONSTaylor, SE2006

A COMPARATIVE BEHAVIORAL STUDY OF THREE GREATER SAGE-GROUSE POPULATIONS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We compared male strut behavior of the genetically distinct Lyon, Nevada/Mono, California Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) population with that of two proximal populations: Nye, Nevada, and Lassen, California. We measured strut rates and nine acoustic components of the strut display in all three populations. Male strut rates did not differ among populations. Acoustic components of the Lyon/Mono and Lassen populations were similar, whereas the Nye population was distinct. The genetically distinct Lyon/ Mono population was more similar behaviorally to the Nye population than the genetically similar Nye and Lassen populations were to each other. Overall, the Lyon/Mono population did not exhibit detectable differences in male strut behavior. Reproductive isolation through sexual selection does not appear to have occurred in the Lyon/Mono population.

Authors

Taylor, SE; Young, JR

Year Published

2006

Publication

The Wilson Journal of Ornithology

Locations
DOI

10.1676/1559-4491(2006)118[0036:ACBSOT]2.0.CO;2

A NEW SPECIES OF SAGE-GROUSE (PHASIANIDAE: CENTROCERCUS ) FROM SOUTHWESTERN COLORADO Young, JR2000

A NEW SPECIES OF SAGE-GROUSE (PHASIANIDAE: CENTROCERCUS ) FROM SOUTHWESTERN COLORADO

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

The Gunnison Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus minimus) is described as a new species from southwestern Colorado and contrasted with the Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) from northern Colorado and western North America. Gunnison Sage-Grouse differ from all other described sage-grouse (C. u. urophasianus. C. u. phaios) in morphological measurements, plumage, courtship display, and generics. The species currently is limited to 8 isolated populations in southwestern Colorado and adjacent San Juan County, Utah. Total estimated spring breeding population is fewer than 5000 individuals with the largest population (<3000) in the Gunnison Basin (Gunnison and Saguache counties), Colorado.

Authors

Young, JR; Braun, CE; Oyler-McCance, SJ; Hupp, JW; Quinn, TW

Year Published

2000

Publication

The Wilson Bulletin

Locations
DOI

10.1676/0043-5643(2000)112[0445:ANSOSG]2.0.CO;2

The Adrenocortical Response of Greater Sage Grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) to Capture, ACTH Injection, and Confinement, as Measured in Fecal Samples Jankowski, M. D.2009

The Adrenocortical Response of Greater Sage Grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus ) to Capture, ACTH Injection, and Confinement, as Measured in Fecal Samples

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Investigators of wildlife populations often utilize demographic indicators to understand the relationship between habitat characteristics and population viability. Assessments of corticosterone may enable earlier detection of populations at risk of decline because physiological adjustments to habitat disturbance occur before reproductive diminutions. Noninvasive methods to accomplish these assesments are important in species of concern, such as the greater sage grouse (GRSG). Therefore, we validated a radioimmunoassay that measures immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (ICM) in fecal samples and used it to characterize the adrenocortical response of 15 GRSG exposed to capture, intravenous injection of 50 IU/kg adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or saline, and 22 h of confinement. Those animals injected with ACTH exhibited a more sustained (P = 0.0139) and less variable (P = 0.0012) response than those injected with saline, indicating different levels of adrenocortical activity. We also found that potential field-collection protocols of fecal samples did not alter ICM concentrations: samples held at 4 degrees C for up to 16 h contained similar levels of ICM as those frozen (-20 degrees C) immediately. This study demonstrates a multiphasic adrenocortical response that varied with the level of stimulation and indicates that the assay used to measure this phenomenon is applicable for studies of wild GRSG.

Authors

Jankowski, M. D.; Wittwer, D. J.; Heisey, D. M.; Franson, J. C.; Hofmeister, E. K.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Physiological And Biochemical Zoology

Locations
DOI

10.1086/596513

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin