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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
THE INFLUENCE OF SEASON, TEMPERATURE, AND ABSORPTIVE STATE ON SAGE GROUSE METABOLISMSHERFY, MH1994

THE INFLUENCE OF SEASON, TEMPERATURE, AND ABSORPTIVE STATE ON SAGE GROUSE METABOLISM

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

We used indirect respiration calorimetry to measure the metabolism of six adult sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) during winter, spring, and summer. During winter the metabolic rate of fed birds was higher (P < 0.05) than that of fasted birds. The standard metabolic rate (SMR) of females (0.692 mL O-2.g(-1).h(-1)) was higher than of males (0.583 mL O-2.g(-1).h(-1)) in winter; in both sexes SMR was higher in winter than in summer. Females' SMR was lower (P = 0.0001) in spring than in winter. Lower critical temperatures of both males and females were substantially lower in winter (-0.6 degrees C, -4.8 degrees C) than in summer (14.9 degrees C, 14.8 degrees C). Although seasonally elevated, the SMR of sage grouse in winter is low in comparison with that of other galliforms with northern distributions. Thermoregulation during a winter night at -10 degrees C would result in minimal (<5%) expenditure of endogenous reserves by either sex. Thermoregulation and SMR in winter are more energetically costly to female sage grouse than to males, and may necessitate increased behavioral thermoregulation by females. Seasonal change in SMR differs between the sexes, and is probably influenced by the energetic demands of the breeding season.

Authors

SHERFY, MH; PEKINS, PJ

Year Published

1994

Publication

Canadian Journal of Zoology-Revue Canadienne De Zoologie

Locations
The influence of gap size on sagebrush cover estimates with the use of line intercept techniqueBoyd, Chad S.2007

The influence of gap size on sagebrush cover estimates with the use of line intercept technique

Keywords

Vegetation inventory, wildlife habitat, sage-grouse, sagebrush obligate

Abstract

Sagebrush cover is often estimated with the use of the line intercept method. However, a lack of standardized protocols may lead to variable estimates of sagebrush canopy cover. Our objectives were to determine the influence of gap size on 1) sagebrush canopy cover estimates, 2) time needed to read a transect, and 3) among-observer variability in sagebrush canopy cover estimates. We utilized 5-, 10-, and 15-cm gaps, and defined a gap as a lack of continuous live or dead shrub canopy. In instances where a segment of dead cover was less than the gap size and adjoined live cover, the dead cover was measured as live. We evaluated canopy cover at 6 Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. Wyomingensis Beetle & A. Young) sites in southeast Oregon. At each site, four 2-person teams measured sagebrush canopy intercept along 50-m transects. Each transect was read by multiple teams to allow for assessment of among-observer variability. Intercept values were converted to percent canopy cover and we used analysis of variance to determine the influence of site and gap size on measurement time and cover estimates. Observer variability was highest at the intermediate gap size (i.e., 10 cm). Transect measurement time was longest with the use of a 5-cm gap (P < 0.001). Total cover estimates were not related to gap size (P = 0.270). Live canopy cover estimates increased (P < 0.001) from 12.1% to 14.5% with increasing gap size, and cover of dead material decreased (P = 0.015) from 4.4% to 3.2%. These differences are small in magnitude and would not likely change a gross assessment of vegetation status. However, use of a standardized gap size will enhance comparability of canopy cover estimates among studies and will decrease between-year sampling error for repeat monitoring.

Authors

Boyd, Chad S.; Bates, Jon D.; Miller, Rick F.

Year Published

2007

Publication

Rangeland Ecology & Management

Locations
DOI

10.2111/05-226R2.1

The Importance of Within-Year Repeated Counts and the Influence of Scale on Long-Term Monitoring of Sage-GrouseFedy, Bradley C.2011

The Importance of Within-Year Repeated Counts and the Influence of Scale on Long-Term Monitoring of Sage-Grouse

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus; generalized additive models; greater sage-grouse; lek; monitoring; population trends; Wyoming

Abstract

Long-term population monitoring is the cornerstone of animal conservation and management. The accuracy and precision of models developed using monitoring data can be influenced by the protocols guiding data collection. The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is a species of concern that has been monitored over decades, primarily, by counting the number of males that attend lek (breeding) sites. These lek count data have been used to assess long-term population trends and for multiple mechanistic studies. However, some studies have questioned the efficacy of lek counts to accurately identify population trends. In response, monitoring protocols were changed to have a goal of counting lek sites multiple times within a season. We assessed the influence of this change in monitoring protocols on model accuracy and precision applying generalized additive models to describe trends over time. We found that at large spatial scales including > 50 leks, the absence of repeated counts within a year did not significantly alter population trend estimates or interpretation. Increasing sample size decreased the model confidence intervals. We developed a population trend model for Wyoming greater sage-grouse from 1965 to 2008, identifying significant changes in the population indices and capturing the cyclic nature of this species. Most sage-grouse declines in Wyoming occurred between 1965 and the 1990s and lek count numbers generally increased from the mid-1990s to 2008. Our results validate the combination of monitoring data collected under different protocols in past and future studies-provided those studies are addressing large-scale questions. We suggest that a larger sample of individual leks is preferable to multiple counts of a smaller sample of leks. (C) 2011 The Wildlife Society.

Authors

Fedy, Bradley C.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

Year Published

2011

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.1002/jwmg.155

THE FOOD HABITS AND SUMMER DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE SAGE GROUSE IN CENTRAL MONTANAPETERSON J G1970

THE FOOD HABITS AND SUMMER DISTRIBUTION OF JUVENILE SAGE GROUSE IN CENTRAL MONTANA

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

The food habits of juvenile sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) were studied in central Montana during the summers of 1966 and 1968. Forbs averaged 75 percent of the diet of 127 juveniles through 12 weeks of age. The flower buds and leaves of common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) and common salsify (Tragopogon dubius) were the most highly preferred and utilized forbs, comprising 25 and 15 percent of the diets, respectively. Other forbs commonly utilized were prairie pepperweed (Lepidium densiflorum), prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola), alfalfa (Medicago sativa), curlcup gumweed (Grindelia squarrosa), and fringed sagewort (Artemisia frigida). Big sagebrush (A. tridentata) received little use until the birds were 11 weeks old. Insect use declined steadily from a high of 60 percent of the diet in 1-week chicks to 5 percent in 12-week-old juveniles. Observed brood locations, after chicks were 2-3 weeks old, were less frequent on the sagebrush-grassland benches and more frequent on lower areas until, by September, the majority of broods were located on bottomlands. Sagebrush, 6-18 inches high, was most prevalent at brood sites used during morning and evening activity periods. Important components of juvenile sage grouse habitat in this area appear to be an abundance and diversity of forbs and densities of sagebrush ranging from 1-20 percent.

Authors

PETERSON J G

Year Published

1970

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/3799502

THE ENERGETIC COST OF DISPLAY IN MALE SAGE GROUSEVEHRENCAMP, SL1989

THE ENERGETIC COST OF DISPLAY IN MALE SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

VEHRENCAMP, SL; BRADBURY, JW; GIBSON, RM

Year Published

1989

Publication

Animal Behaviour

Locations
The effects of raven removal on sage grouse nest success.Coates, Peter S.2004

The effects of raven removal on sage grouse nest success.

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, nest success, predator control, raven damage management, sage grouse, video nest monitoring

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Coates, Peter S.; Delehanty, David J.

Year Published

2004

Publication

Proceedings of The Vertebrate Pest Conference

Locations
The effect of vegetation structure on predation of artificial Greater Sage-Grouse nestsWatters, ME2002

The effect of vegetation structure on predation of artificial Greater Sage-Grouse nests

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

In Canada, Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) are considered an endangered species by the Committee On the Status of Endangered Wildlife In Canada (COSEWIC), due to declining population numbers and distribution. Encroachment of agriculture and subsequent destruction of suitable sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) habitat is thought to be responsible for historical population declines However, subtle changes in habitat quality may also result in reduced escape and nesting cover, which may lead to increased levels of predation. We examined the influence of vegetation cover and height on the fate of artificial Greater Sage-Grouse nests Because most natural sage-grouse nests are associated with sagebrush, we predicted that sagebrush height and cover would be crucial to the success of nests. Lateral cover is important in protecting nests from detection by predators, and thus we predicted that nests surrounded by shorter grass would suffer greater predation rates than nests with taller grass. To experimentally test this hypothesis, we trimmed grass surrounding some artificial nests Richardson's ground squirrels (Spermophilus richardsonii) were the primary predators of artificial nests, with some predation by corvids and badgers (Taxidea taxus). Successful nests tended to be surrounded by shorter sagebrush, taller grasses, and taller, denser forbs than predated nests. Trimming grass around nests did not affect nest fate However, ground squirrels typically attacked nests with less forb cover and fewer sagebrush, and avian predators tended to destroy nests at inactive leks with greater lateral cover. Thus, lateral cover provided by forbs and sagebrush appeared to be important for protecting nests from mammalian predators. These results suggest implementing management strategies that improve sagebrush habitat by providing tall, dense forbs and sagebrush, which could increase Greater Sage-Grouse nest success and recruitment.

Authors

Watters, ME; McLash, TL; Aldridge, CL; Brigham, RM

Year Published

2002

Publication

Ecoscience

Locations
Testing sagebrush allometric relationships across three fire chronosequences in Wyoming, USACleary, M. B.2008

Testing sagebrush allometric relationships across three fire chronosequences in Wyoming, USA

Keywords

aboveground biomass; Artemisia tridentate; plant allometry; root biomass; universal scaling

Abstract

Aboveground and coarse root allometric relationships were tested across three mountain big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata var. vaseyana (Rydb.) chronosequences at three stages of recovery from fire (establishment, expansion, and mature) in Wyoming, USA. Big sagebrush shrubs dominate North American rangelands and are critical components of habitat for threatened species such as sage grouse. There were no differences in regression relationships estimating biomass over space and time, which reduces the need to destructively sample sagebrush for local studies and supports regional carbon modeling and biomass estimates. Crown volume (CV) explained the most variability (R-2 > 0.75) in aboveground biomass, and crown area (CA) explained the most variability for coarse roots (R-2 >0.87). Analyses supported both the 2/3 power universal scaling rules between leaf and stem biomass, but did not support global models of seed plant and reproductive part biomass. This study provides compelling evidence that simple field measurements may be used to estimate biomass over large regions and that universal scaling rules are valid for semiarid shrubs. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Authors

Cleary, M. B.; Pendall, E.; Ewers, B. E.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Arid Environments

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.jaridenv.2007.07.013

Territoriality and non-random mating in sage grouse, Centrocercus urophaslanus.Wiley, R.H.1973

Territoriality and non-random mating in sage grouse, Centrocercus urophaslanus.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Wiley, R.H.

Year Published

1973

Publication

Animal Behav Monogr

Locations
Temporal variation in diet and nutrition of preincubating greater sage-grouseGregg, Michael A.2008

Temporal variation in diet and nutrition of preincubating greater sage-grouse

Keywords

calcium, Centrocercus urophasianus, crude protein, forb, phosphorus, reproduction

Abstract

Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) habitat management involves vegetation manipulations to increase or decrease specific habitat components. For sage-grouse habitat management to be most effective, all understanding of the functional response of sage-grouse to changes in resource availability is critical. We investigated temporal variation in diet composition and nutrient content (crude protein, calcium, and phosphorus) of foods consumed by preincubating female sage-grouse relative to food supply and age of hen. We collected 86 preincubating female greater sage-grouse at foraging areas during early (18-31 March) and late (1-12 April) preincubation periods during 2002-2003. Females consumed 22 food types including low sagebrush (Artemisia arbuscula Nutt.), big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.), 15 forb species, 2 insect taxa, sagebrush galls, moss, and a trace amount of unidentified grasses. Low sagebrush was the most common food item, but forbs were found in 89% of the crops and composed 30.1% aggregate dry mass (ADM) of the diet. ADM and species composition of female diets were highly variable between collection periods and years, and coincided with temporal variation in forb availability. Adult females consumed more forbs and less low sagebrush compared to yearling females. Because of higher levels of crude protein, calcium, and phosphorus, forbs were important diet components in comparison with low sagebrush, which had the lowest nutrient content of all foods consumed. Our results indicate that increased forb abundance in areas used by female sage-grouse prior to nesting would increase their forb consumption and nutritional status for reproduction. We recommend that managers should emphasize delineation of habitats used by preincubating sage-grouse and evaluate the need for enhancing forb abundance and diversity.

Authors

Gregg, Michael A.; Barnett, Jenny K.; Crawford, John A.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Rangeland Ecology & Management

Locations
DOI

10.2111/08-037.1

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin