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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Temporal and hierarchical spatial components of animal occurrence: conserving seasonal habitat for greater sage-grouseDzialak, M.R.2012

Temporal and hierarchical spatial components of animal occurrence: conserving seasonal habitat for greater sage-grouse

Keywords

diel cycle; energy development; GPS; greater sage-grouse, hierarchical process, individual variation;random effects; resource selection function; spatial modeling; sustainable landscape management; winter.

Abstract

Developing strategies for sustainable management of landscapes requires research that bridges regionally important ecological and socioeconomic issues, and that aims to provide solutions to sustainability problems.We integrated Global Positioning Systems (GPS) telemetry and statistical modeling to quantify hierarchical spatial and temporal components of occurrence among greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; n ¼ 87), a species of conservation concern, with the larger goal of developing spatially-explicit guidance for conservation of important winter habitat in a Wyoming, USA landscape undergoing development for energy resources. The pattern of occurrence at the landscape level (secondorder) and within seasonal use areas (third-order) included selection for shrub vegetation with a prominent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) component, and avoidance of rough terrain, mesic areas, and human activity. A change in resource selection behavior across the diel cycle was not an apparent component of the higherorder selection process; however, at the finer scale of investigation sage-grouse shifted behavior across the diel cycle in ways likely related to risk aversion or maintaining a favorable thermal environment (i.e., daytime- only avoidance of natural gas wells and night-time-only selection for taller shrubs). At both spatial scales there was considerably more variation among individuals in the sign of their association with anthropogenic features than with vegetation and terrain. The final spatially-explicit model, which depicted lower-order selection (local, patch-level, and seasonal use area) across the diel cycle constrained by selection processes at a higher order (second-order), validated well, offering specific guidance for managing human activity and sage-grouse conservation in the study area, and general guidance in developing sustainable landscape management strategies when animal occurrence reflects multiple spatial and temporal processes.

Authors

Dzialak, M. R., C. V. Olson, S. M. Harju, S. L. Webb, and J. B. Winstead

Year Published

2012

Publication

Ecosphere

Locations
DOI

10.1890/ES11-00315.1

This article contributed by:

Ecological Society of America

TECHNICAL NOTE - DIETS AND FOOD SELECTION OF SAGE GROUSE CHICKS IN OREGONDRUT, MS1994

TECHNICAL NOTE - DIETS AND FOOD SELECTION OF SAGE GROUSE CHICKS IN OREGON

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, diets, food, Oregon, sage grouse, selection

Abstract

Diets and food selection by sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) chicks were determined during 1989 and 1990 on 2 areas that differed in long-term grouse productivity. Chicks consumed the same foods in similar frequencies and exhibited similar dietary selection on the areas, but relative dry mass differed. Forbs and invertebrates composed 80% of the dietary mass on the area with higher grouse productivity, whereas chicks on the other area consumed primarily (65%) sagebrush (Artemisia spp. L.).

Authors

DRUT, MS; PYLE, WH; CRAWFORD, JA

Year Published

1994

Publication

Journal of Range Management

Locations
DOI

10.2307/4002848

Tactical allocation of effort among multiple signals in sage grouse: an experiment with a robotic femalePatricelli, Gail L.2010

Tactical allocation of effort among multiple signals in sage grouse: an experiment with a robotic female

Keywords

acoustic localization communication greater sage grouse multiple traits plasticity sexual selection trade-off

Abstract

Males in many species have complex, multicomponent sexual signals, and there may be trade-offs between different signal components. By adjusting their signaling behaviors, males may be able to produce more attractive courtship displays in the face of these trade-offs, but this possibility has rarely been tested. In this study, we examined adaptive adjustment of display behaviors during courtship in a lek-breeding bird, the greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). We measured the potential trade-off between display quantity (display rate) and quality (a temporal feature of displays) in a wild population of sage grouse using controlled approaches of a robotic female to experimentally induce changes in male display rate. We found that males who are more successful in mating can increase quantity without a decline in quality, with only unsuccessful males expressing an apparent trade-off. Male mating success was also positively correlated with responsiveness to changes in receiver distance, suggesting that successful males may avoid a trade-off by tactically adjusting their display rate-saving energy by displaying at low levels when females are farther away and at higher levels as females approach. Alternative explanations for this differential response to female proximity are discussed. Our results suggest that to be successful, males may need both the ability to produce attractive signals and the ability to effectively allocate their display effort by responding to female behaviors.

Authors

Patricelli, Gail L.; Krakauer, Alan H.

Year Published

2010

Publication

Behavioral Ecology

Locations
DOI

10.1093/beheco/arp155

Susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to experimental infection with West Nile virusClark, L2006

Susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to experimental infection with West Nile virus

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus experimental infection greater sage-grouse vaccine West Nile virus

Abstract

Populations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have declined 45-80% in North America since 1950. Although much of this decline has been attributed to habitat loss, recent field studies have indicated that West Nile virus (WNV) has had a significant negative impact on local populations of grouse. We confirm the susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to WNV infection in laboratory experimental studies. Grouse were challenged by subcutaneous injection of WNV (10(3.2) plaque-forming units [PFUs]). All grouse died within 6 days of infection. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for 50% survival was 4.5 days. Mean peak viremia for nonvaccinated birds was 10(6.4) PFUs/ml (+/- 10(0.2) PFUs/ml, standard error of the mean [SEM]). Virus was shed cloacally and orally. Four of the five vaccinated grouse died, but survival tune was increased (50% survival = 9.5 days), with 1 grouse surviving to the end-point of the experiment (14 days) kith no signs of illness. Mean peak viremia for the vaccinated birds was 10(2.3) PFUs/ml (+/- 10(0.6) PFUs/ml, SEM). Two birds cleared the virus from their blood before death or euthanasia. These data emphasize the high susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to infection with WNV.

Authors

Clark, L; Hall, J; McLean, R; Dunbar, M; Klenk, K; Bowen, R; Smeraski, CA

Year Published

2006

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Diseases

Locations
SUSCEPTIBILITY OF GREATER SAGE-GROUSE TO EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH WEST NILE VIRUSClark, Larry2006

SUSCEPTIBILITY OF GREATER SAGE-GROUSE TO EXPERIMENTAL INFECTION WITH WEST NILE VIRUS

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus, experimental infection, greater sage-grouse, vaccine, West Nile virus, WNV

Abstract

Populations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have declined 45– 80% in North America since 1950. Although much of this decline has been attributed to habitat loss, recent field studies have indicated that West Nile virus (WNV) has had a significant negative impact on local populations of grouse. We confirm the susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to WNV infection in laboratory experimental studies. Grouse were challenged by subcutaneous injection of WNV (103.2 plaque-forming units [PFUs]). All grouse died within 6 days of infection. The Kaplan-Meier estimate for 50% survival was 4.5 days. Mean peak viremia for nonvaccinated birds was 106.4 PFUs/ml (±100.2 PFUs/ml, standard error of the mean [SEM]). Virus was shed cloacally and orally. Four of the five vaccinated grouse died, but survival time was increased (50% survival=9.5 days), with 1 grouse surviving to the end-point of the experiment (14 days) with no signs of illness. Mean peak viremia for the vaccinated birds was 102.3 PFUs/ml (±100.6 PFUs/ml, SEM). Two birds cleared the virus from their blood before death or euthanasia. These data emphasize the high susceptibility of greater sage-grouse to infection with WNV.

Authors

Klenk, Kaci, Bowen, Richard, Clark, Larry, Hall, Jeffrey, McLean, Robert, Dunbar, Michael and Smeraski, Cynthia A.

Year Published

2006

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Diseases

Locations
DOI

10.7589/0090-3558-42.1.14

Additional Information:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16699144

Survival, movements, and reproduction of translocated greater sage-grouse in Strawberry Valley, UtahBaxter, Rick J.2008

Survival, movements, and reproduction of translocated greater sage-grouse in Strawberry Valley, Utah

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus; clutch size; dispersal; flocking; greater sage-grouse; nest success; reproductive output; survival; translocation

Abstract

Translocations of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) have been attempted in 7 states and one Canadian province with very little success. To recover a small remnant population and test the efficacy of sage-grouse translocations, we captured and transported 137 adult female sage-grouse from 2 source populations to a release site in Strawberry Valley, Utah, USA, during March-April 2003-2005. The resident population of sage-grouse in Strawberry Valey was approximately 150 breeding birds prior to the release. We radiomarked each female and documented survival, movements, reproductive effort, flocking with resident grouse, and lek attendance. We used Program MARK to calculate annual survival of translocated females in the first year after release, which averaged 0.60 (95% CI = 0.515-0.681). Movements of translocated females were within current and historic sage-grouse habitat in Strawberry Valley, and we detected no grouse outside of the study area. Nesting propensity for first (newly translocated) and second (surviving) year females was 39% and 73%, respectively. Observed nest success of all translocated females during the study was 67%. By the end of their first year in Strawberry Valley, 100% of the living translocated sage-grouse were in flocks with resident sage-grouse. The translocated grouse attended the same lek as the birds with which they were grouped. In 2006, the peak male count for the only remaining active lek in Strawberry Valley was almost 4 times (135 M) the 6-year pretranslocation (1998-2003) average peak attendance of 36 males (range 24-50 M). Translocations can be an effective management tool to increase small populations of greater sage-grouse when conducted during the breeding season and before target populations have been extirpated.

Authors

Baxter, Rick J.; Flinders, Jerran T.; Mitchell, Dean L.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2006-402

Survival Rates of Female Greater Sage-Grouse in Autumn and Winter in Southeastern OregonAnthony, Robert G.2009

Survival Rates of Female Greater Sage-Grouse in Autumn and Winter in Southeastern Oregon

Keywords

Centrocercus urophasianus; fall—winter survival rates; known-fate models; Oregon; sage-grouse; weather effects

Abstract

We estimated survival rates of 135 female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) on 3 study areas in southeastern Oregon, USA during autumn and winter for 3 years. We used known-fate models in Program MARK to test for differences among study areas and years, investigate the potential influence of weather, and compute estimates of overwinter survival. We found no evidence for differences in survival rates among study areas, which was contrary to our original hypothesis. There also were no declines in survival rates during fall-winter, but survival rates varied among years and time within years. Average survival rate from October through February was 0.456 (SE = 0.062). The coefficient of variation for this estimate was 13.6% indicating good precision in our estimates of survival. We found strong evidence for an effect of weather (i.e., mean daily min. temp, extreme min. temp, snow depth) on bi-weekly survival rates of sage-grouse for 2 of the study areas in one year. Extremely low ( 1,500 m) elevations. In contrast, we found no evidence for an influence of weather on the low-elevation study area or during the winters of 1989-1990 and 1991-1992. Extreme weather during winter can cause lower survival of adult female sage-grouse, so managers should be aware of these potential effects and reduce harvest rates accordingly. (JOURNAL OF WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 73(4): 538-545; 2009)

Authors

Anthony, Robert G.; Willis, Mitchell J.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2008-177

Survival of Translocated Greater Sage-Grouse Hens in Northeastern CaliforniaBell, Chad B.2012

Survival of Translocated Greater Sage-Grouse Hens in Northeastern California

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Translocation success of Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is generally measured by documenting whether translocated individuals survive and reproduce at the release site. However. demographic parameters, such as annual survival of translocated individuals, provide a more accurate measure of translocation success. We translocated 60 female sage-grouse from Oregon and Nevada to Clear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, California, during 2005-2010 to augment a small population of resident grouse. We radio-marked each translocated female and a sample of resident female sage-grouse, recorded their locations, and monitored their survival at monthly intervals over the study period. We observed most (55/60) translocated birds near (<2 Delta AlCc) with the top model. However, the 1 coefficient distinguishing breeding from nonbreeding season survival was the only coefficient whose 95% confidence interval did not overlap zero; monthly survival during the breeding season (0.952 +/- 0.014) was lower than during the nonbreeding season (0.960 +/- 0.008). The model average estimate of annual survival for female sage-grouse in our study area was 59.6% (95% CI 47.9-70.1). Our analyses provide little support for a difference in survival between translocated and resident sage-grouse, :mud our annual survival estimates were comparable to annual survival estimates of resident sage-grouse in other locations. Our results suggest that when current recommendations for translocation protocols are followed, translocated female sage-grouse survive just as well as resident individuals and quickly integrate into the local population.

Authors

Bell, Chad B.; George, T. Luke

Year Published

2012

Publication

Western North American Naturalist

Locations
DOI

10.3398/064.072.0311

Survival of Greater Sage-Grouse Chicks and Broods in the Northern Great Basin.GREGG, MICHAEL A.2009

Survival of Greater Sage-Grouse Chicks and Broods in the Northern Great Basin.

Keywords

brood;Centrocercus urophasianus;chick;forbs;greater sage-grouse;insects;Lepidoptera;radiotelemetry;survival

Abstract

Reduced annual recruitment because of poor habitat quality has been implicated as one of the causative factors in the range-wide decline of sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations since the 1950s. Because chick and brood survival are directly linked to annual recruitment and may be the primary factors that limit sage-grouse population growth, we estimated 28-day survival rates of radiomarked chicks and broods from 2000 to 2003. We examined relationships between survival and several habitat variables measured at brood sites, including food availability (insects and forbs); horizontal cover of sagebrush, grasses, and forbs; and vertical cover of sagebrush and grass. We monitored 506 radiomarked chicks from 94 broods; chick survival was 0.392 (SE = 0.024). We found evidence that both food and cover variables were positively associated with chick survival, including Lepidoptera availability, slender phlox (Phlox gracilis) frequency, total forb cover, and grass cover. The effect of total grass cover on chick survival was dependent on the proportion of short grass. The hazard of an individual chick's death decreased 8.6% (95% CI = ?1.0 to 18.3) for each percentage point increase in total grass cover when the proportion of short grass was >70%. Survival of 83 radiomarked broods was 0.673 (SE = 0.055). Lepidoptera availability and slender phlox frequency were the only habitat variables related to brood survival. Risk of total brood loss decreased by 11.8% (95% CI = 1.2-22.5) for each additional Lepidoptera individual and 2.7% (95% CI = ?0.4 to 5.8) for each percentage point increase in the frequency of slender phlox found at brood sites. Model selection results revealed that temporal differences in brood survival were associated with variation in the availability of Lepidoptera and slender phlox. Years with high brood survival corresponded with years of high Lepidoptera availability and high slender phlox frequency. These foods likely provided high-quality nutrition for chicks during early growth and development and enhanced survival. Habitat management that promotes Lepidoptera and slender phlox abundance during May and June (i.e., early brood rearing) should have a positive effect on chick and brood survival in the short term and potentially increase annual recruitment.

Authors

GREGG, MICHAEL A. and JOHN A. CRAWFORD.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.2193/2007-410

Survival and Detectability Bias of Avian Fence Collision Surveys in Sagebrush SteppeStevens, Bryan S.2011

Survival and Detectability Bias of Avian Fence Collision Surveys in Sagebrush Steppe

Keywords

carcass survival; Centrocercus urophasianus; detectability; fence collisions; Idaho; sagebrush; sage-grouse; scavenging

Abstract

We used female ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) carcasses as surrogates for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) to study factors influencing survival and detection bias associated with avian fence collision surveys in southern Idaho, USA, during spring 2009. We randomly placed 50 pheasant carcasses on each of 2 study areas, estimated detection probability during fence-line surveys, and monitored survival and retention of carcasses and their associated sign over a 31-day period. Survival modeling suggested site and habitat features had little impact on carcass survival, and constant survival models were most supported by the data. Model averaged carcass daily survival probability was low on both study areas and ranged from 0.776 to 0.812. Survival of all carcass sign varied strongly by location, and the top sign survival model included a site effect parameter. Model averaged daily survival probability for collision sign on the 2 study sites ranged from 0.863 to 0.988 and varied between sites. Logistic regression modeling indicated detection probability of carcasses during fence-line surveys for avian collision victims was influenced by habitat type and microsite shrub height at the carcass location. Carcasses located in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) habitats were detected at a lower rate (0.36) than carcasses in little (A. arbuscula) and black sagebrush (A. nova) habitats (0.71). Increasing shrub height at the carcass location from the little sagebrush mean of 16.5 cm to the big sagebrush mean of 36.0 cm reduced detection probability by approximately 30%. Avian fence collision surveys in sagebrush-steppe habitats should be conducted at <= 2-week sampling intervals to reduce the impact of survival bias on collision rate estimates. Two-week sampling intervals may be too long in areas with low carcass and sign survival, therefore survival rates should be estimated on all study areas to determine the appropriate sampling interval duration. Researchers should be aware of the effects of local vegetation on detection probabilities, and methods to correct detection probabilities based on collision site attributes should be applied to ensure more accurate collision rate estimates. Additionally, caution should be used when aggregating or comparing uncorrected collision data from areas with differing vegetation, as detection probabilities are likely different between sites. (C) 2011 The Wildlife Society.

Authors

Stevens, Bryan S.; Reese, Kerry P.; Connelly, John W.

Year Published

2011

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
DOI

10.1002/jwmg.53

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

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published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin