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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
LEK BEHAVIOR IN CAPTIVE SAGE GROUSE CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUSSPURRIER, MF1994

LEK BEHAVIOR IN CAPTIVE SAGE GROUSE CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

SPURRIER, MF; BOYCE, MS; MANLY, BFJ

Year Published

1994

Publication

Animal Behaviour

Locations
OBSERVATIONS OF WINTERING GYRFALCONS (FALCO-RUSTICOLUS) HUNTING SAGE GROUSE (CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUS) IN WYOMING AND MONTANA USAGARBER, CS1993

OBSERVATIONS OF WINTERING GYRFALCONS (FALCO-RUSTICOLUS) HUNTING SAGE GROUSE (CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUS) IN WYOMING AND MONTANA USA

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

GARBER, CS; MUTCH, BD; PLATT, S

Year Published

1993

Publication

Journal of Raptor Research

Locations
SUMMER HABITAT USE AND SELECTION BY FEMALE SAGE GROUSE (CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUS) IN OREGONGREGG, MA1993

SUMMER HABITAT USE AND SELECTION BY FEMALE SAGE GROUSE (CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUS) IN OREGON

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Cover types and vegetative characteristics (e.g., grasses, forbs, shrubs) used by female Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) during summer were compared with available habitat on hr on study areas in southeastern Oregon. Broodless hens, which constituted 114 of the 125 (91%) radio-marked hens studied, selected big (Artemisia tridentata subspp.) and low sagebrush (A, arbuscula) cover types at both study areas. At Hart Mountain, broodless hens did not select specific vegetative characteristics within cover types. However, at Jackass Creek, forb cover was greater (P = .004) at broodless hen sites than at random locations. Differences in habitat use by broodless hens between study areas were associated with differences in forb availability. Broodless hens used a greater diversity of cover types than hens with broods. Broodless hens gathered in flocks and remained separate from but near hens with broods during early summer. By early July broodless hens moved to meadows while hens with broods remained in upland habitats.

Authors

GREGG, MA; CRAWFORD, JA; DRUT, MS

Year Published

1993

Publication

Great Basin Naturalist

Locations
Antelope, sage grouse, and Neotropical migrants.Rothwell, Reg.1993

Antelope, sage grouse, and Neotropical migrants.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Rothwell, Reg.

Year Published

1993

Publication

U S Forest Service

Locations
AN IMPROVED SPOTLIGHTING TECHNIQUE FOR CAPTURING SAGE GROUSEWAKKINEN, WL1992

AN IMPROVED SPOTLIGHTING TECHNIQUE FOR CAPTURING SAGE GROUSE

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

WAKKINEN, WL; REESE, KP; CONNELLY, JW; FISCHER, RA

Year Published

1992

Publication

Wildlife Society Bulletin

Locations
LEK FORMATION IN SAGE GROUSE - THE EFFECT OF FEMALE CHOICE ON MALE TERRITORY SETTLEMENTGIBSON, RM1992

LEK FORMATION IN SAGE GROUSE - THE EFFECT OF FEMALE CHOICE ON MALE TERRITORY SETTLEMENT

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

GIBSON, RM

Year Published

1992

Publication

Animal Behaviour

Locations
GEOGRAPHIC-VARIATION AMONG SAGE GROUSE IN COLORADOHUPP, JW1991

GEOGRAPHIC-VARIATION AMONG SAGE GROUSE IN COLORADO

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

HUPP, JW; BRAUN, CE

Year Published

1991

Publication

Wilson Bulletin

Locations
SAGE GROUSE STATUS AND RECOVERY PLAN FOR STRAWBERRY VALLEY, UTAHWELCH, BL1990

SAGE GROUSE STATUS AND RECOVERY PLAN FOR STRAWBERRY VALLEY, UTAH

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Since 1939, an estimated 3,000 sage grouse in Strawberry Valley, UT, have declined to some 180 birds, mainly because of reservoir construction and eradication of big sagebrush to promote livestock forage. A 4-year study of numbers and movements of radio-tagged grouse has provided the basis for a recovery program calling for rejuvenation of big sage-brush and forbs important to grouse, replacement of mating grounds lost to human activities, consideration of sage grouse biology in management decisions, and formation of a sage grouse recovery team.

Authors

WELCH, BL; WAGSTAFF, FJ; WILLIAMS, RL

Year Published

1990

Publication

USDA Forest Service Intermountain Research Station Research Paper

Locations
THE RED QUEEN VISITS SAGE GROUSE LEKSBOYCE, MS1990

THE RED QUEEN VISITS SAGE GROUSE LEKS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

BOYCE, MS

Year Published

1990

Publication

American Zoologist

Locations
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BLOOD PARASITES, MATING SUCCESS AND PHENOTYPIC CUES IN MALE SAGE GROUSE CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUSGIBSON, RM1990

RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN BLOOD PARASITES, MATING SUCCESS AND PHENOTYPIC CUES IN MALE SAGE GROUSE CENTROCERCUS-UROPHASIANUS

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

GIBSON, RM

Year Published

1990

Publication

American Zoologist

Locations

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin