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One of the largest bibliographies of sage grouse literature available online

Description

The greater sage-grouse, a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973 has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush steppe ecosystems of western North America. Sage-grouse now occupy only 56% of their pre-settlement range, though they still occur in 11 western states and 2 Canadian provinces.

latest article added on August 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Territoriality and non-random mating in sage grouse, Centrocercus urophaslanus.Wiley, R.H.1973

Territoriality and non-random mating in sage grouse, Centrocercus urophaslanus.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Wiley, R.H.

Year Published

1973

Publication

Animal Behav Monogr

Locations
The strut display of male sage grouse: a 'fixed' action pattern.Wiley, R.H.1973

The strut display of male sage grouse: a 'fixed' action pattern.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Wiley, R.H.

Year Published

1973

Publication

Behaviour

Locations
Ecology, productivity and management of sage grouse in Idaho.Dalke, P. D.1963

Ecology, productivity and management of sage grouse in Idaho.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

A study of the seasonal movements, productivity, and management of sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was undertaken by the Idaho Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit from August, 1952, to May, 1960, on an area in Fremont and Clark counties in Idaho, directly west of Yellowstone National Park. Nineteen individual strutting grounds 1/10-10 acres in size were located along 12 miles of the Red Road. Summer brood range was found to be 13-27 miles north and northeast of the Red Road strutting grounds. Flocks of sage grouse began migrating west and southwest in October and November and traveled 30-50 miles, depending upon the depth of the snow. Winter concentrations were usually found where snow was less than 6 inches deep. Dispersal and return east and northeast to the breeding grounds began in late winter for a yearly round trip of 50-100 miles. The number of adult males increased quickly on strutting grounds, and the peak of breeding occurred April 7-21. Strutting grounds were abandoned early in May if there was a high ratio of adults to subadults. A late season peak of subadult males was often seen on strutting grounds after all other grouse had departed. Interstrutting movements of adult males varied from 22 to 53 percent and up to 4.3 miles from original banding sites. Sexing criteria included plumage differences on chin, throat, breast, undertail coverts, and minor marginal tectrices; size of feet; wing length and length of primaries; weights of adults. Identification of gonads provided the only ready internal diagnostic characteristics of sex. Aging criteria included measurement of bursa, and characteristics of outer two primaries, second primary covert, undertail coverts, and sternum. The mandible test is not reliable for adult sage grouse. The high counts of males on strutting grounds has provided a reasonably accurate method of determining breeding population trends. The method may be as much as 20 percent conservative because of cocks which are not on strutting grounds. The reproductive potential cannot be fully assessed without knowledge of the relative proportion of adult to subadult females. Ovulated-follicle counts as a measure of the number of eggs laid are unreliable, but are useful in determining the relative laying effort between yearlings and adult females. Adverse weather during hatching appreciably lowered number of grouse available for fall hunting. Brood census on summer range is useful in determining reproductive success and is reliable until the third week in July, when brood structure begins to deteriorate.

Authors

Dalke, P. D.; Pyrah, D. B.; Stanton, D. C.; Crawford, J. E.; Schlatterer, E. F.

Year Published

1963

Publication

Journal of Wildlife Management

Locations
A note on the food of sage grouse in the Madeline Plains area of CaliforniaLEACH, HOWARD R.1958

A note on the food of sage grouse in the Madeline Plains area of California

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Eighty-five sage grouse stomachs were collected September 3-4, 1955 from hunter-killed birds. Of the total volume of food, 98.2% was vegetable origin and 1.8% was animal. Flowers and buds of Lactuca scariola made up 50%, and Artemisia tridentata leafage and flowers amounted to 31.6% of the total. The bulk of animal food consisted of ants. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: C. M. Ferrel

Authors

LEACH, HOWARD R.; BROWNING, BRUCE M.

Year Published

1958

Publication

California Fish And Game

Locations
Precocial strutting in sage grouseGULLION, GORDON W.1957

Precocial strutting in sage grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

GULLION, GORDON W.

Year Published

1957

Publication

The Condor: Ornithological Applications

Locations
Insect food of the sage grouseKnowlton, GF1942

Insect food of the sage grouse

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Knowlton, GF; Thornley, HF

Year Published

1942

Publication

Journal of Economic Entomology

Locations
Sage grouse coccidiosis not transmissible to chickensHoness, Ralph F.1942

Sage grouse coccidiosis not transmissible to chickens

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

[long dash]Cross-infection expts. are cited which show that coccidiosis (Eimeria angusta and for E. centro-cerci) is not carried to domestic chickens by the sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), and it seems probable that infection by the sage grouse is not brought about by contact with infected domestic birds.

Authors

Honess, Ralph F.

Year Published

1942

Publication

Poultry Sci

Locations
Mating behavior of the Sage Grouse.Scott, J. W.1942

Mating behavior of the Sage Grouse.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Scott, J. W.

Year Published

1942

Publication

The Auk: Ornithological Advances

Locations
Mating performance of the Sage Grouse.Simon, J. R.1940

Mating performance of the Sage Grouse.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Mating behavior of the Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) was observed on April 5-8, 1940 near Skully Point, about 11 miles south of Kemmerer, Wyoming. A blind was found impractical but an automobile proved satisfactory for an observation point, not interfering with the activities of the birds. Car lights were off and men silent by 5 A.M. and, although before dawn, [male][male] were on the strutting ground in full progress with courtship display but [female][female] could not be observed until shortly after 5. About 300 cocks and 80 hens were present on the area, 200 yards wide and 1/4 mile long. Each cock stood 25-40 feet from his neighbor; sometimes they fought, mostly with wing-beating. Hens, in groups of 6 to 32, moved about the grounds and were kept grouped by 8-10 [male][male]. Most of the mating activity took place between 5 and 8 A.M. Strutting was confined to areas about 5 ft. in diam. The strut started with raising and spreading the wings, spreading the tail and raising the long black plumes on the back of the neck, followed by inflation of the large air sacs so that bare bulbs of yellowish breast skin showed. Then the birds walked forward, with head high, tossing the head and breast regions upward and forward 3 times, also mantling the head with white breast and neck feathers. Deflation of the air-sacs resulted in a bumping or plopping. Many photographs were presented showing these steps. Coition seemed to occur only on invitation from the [female]. It required 6-12 seconds. One [male] was observed to mate with 3 hens. || ABSTRACT AUTHORS: L. H. Walkinshaw

Authors

Simon, J. R.

Year Published

1940

Publication

The Auk: Ornithological Advances

Locations
A new cestode Raillietina centrocerci, from the sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus.Simon, F.1937

A new cestode Raillietina centrocerci, from the sage grouse Centrocercus urophasianus.

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Simon, F.

Year Published

1937

Publication

Transactions of The American Microscopical Society

Locations

Recent Articles

The Secret Sex Lives of Sage-Grouse: Multiple Paternity and Intraspecific Nest Parasitism Revealed Through Genetic Analysis

by Bird, Krista, Aldridge, Cameron, Carpenter, Jennifer, Paszkowski, Cynthia, Boyce, Mark and Coltman, David

In lek-based mating systems only a few males are expected to obtain the majority of matings in a single breeding season and multiple mating is believed to be rare. We used 13 microsatellites to genotype greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) samples from 604 adults and 1206 offspring from 191 clutches (1999-2006) from Alberta, Canada, to determine paternity and polygamy (males and fema...

published 2013 in Behavioral Ecology

Seasonal Reproductive Costs Contribute to Reduced Survival of Female Greater Sage-grouse

by Blomberg, Erik, Sedinger, James, Nonne, Daniel and Atamian, Michael

Tradeoffs among demographic traits are a central component of life history theory. We investigated tradeoffs between reproductive effort and survival in female greater sage-grouse breeding in the American Great Basin, while also considering reproductive heterogeneity by examining covariance among current and future reproductive success. We analyzed survival and reproductive histories from 328 i...

published 2013 in Journal of Avian Biology


Greater Sage-Grouse and Severe Winter Conditions: Identifying Habitat for Conservation

by Dzialak, Matthew, Webb, Stephen, Harju, Seth, Olson, Chad, Winstead, Jeffrey and Hayden Wing, Larry

d Developing sustainable rangeland management strategies requires solution-driven research that addresses ecological issues within the context of regionally important socioeconomic concerns. A key sustainability issue in many regions of the world is conserving habitat that buffers animal populations from climatic variability, including seasonal deviation from long-term precipitation or temperat...

published 2013 in Rangeland Ecology & Management

Using Spatial Statistics and Point-Pattern Simulations to Assess the Spatial Dependency Between Greater Sage-Grouse and Anthropogenic Features

by Gillan, Jeffrey K., Strand, Eva K., Karl, Jason W., Reese, Kerry P. and Laninga, Tamara

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus; hereafter, sage-grouse), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, has experienced population declines across its range in the sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) steppe ecosystems of western North America. One factor contributing to the loss of habitat is the expanding human population with associated development and infrast...

published 2013 in Wildlife Society Bulletin