Coal Mining

Description

Coal Mining Remote Sensing

latest article added on February 2015

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Multitemporal analysis of satellite data and their use in the monitoring of the environmental impacts of open cast lignite mining areas in Eastern GermanySchmidt, H.1998

Multitemporal analysis of satellite data and their use in the monitoring of the environmental impacts of open cast lignite mining areas in Eastern Germany

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

This paper reports an investigation into the use and application of remote sensing data for monitoring the environmental impacts of open cast lignite mining in Eastern Germany. The use of remote sensing for environmental monitoring and the reclamation of such devastated areas has been demonstrated on three open cast lignite mining areas, only one of which is still active. This investigation is based on the digital analysis of several Landsat-TM and ERS-1 data sets acquired from 1989 to 1994. The characteristics of the imagery enable quantitative analysis of di€ erent open cast mine features, such as waste, water bodies, change of land use, reclamation processes and estimation of vegetation cover in the a€ ected areas. On the basis of the Maximum Likelihood Classi® cation of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data the open cast mining areas were separated into bare open cast areas and areas of less and dense vegetation. The bare open cast areas were classi® ed with respect to type of di€ erent sediments and the vegetation was separated into di€ erent classes according to the age of the vegetation and the density cover. Apart from these, water bodies within the mining areas were classi® ed into di€ erent spectral classes depending on their hydrochemical properties. The classi® cation algorithm was applied to all the Landsat TM data in order to detect temporal and spatial changes in the mining areas. A 1993 ERS-1 image was used in an e€ ort to determine the geomorphological features of the open cast lignite mining areas. An enhanced ERS-1 image provided a helpful tool for the visual interpretation, but integration of the ERS-1 image did not improve the ® nal classi® cation results.

Authors

Schmidt, H. and Glaesser, C.

Year Published

1998

Publication

International Journal of Remote Sensing

Locations
DOI

10.1080/014311698214695

Environmental Impact Assessment of the Mining and Concentration Activities in the Kola Peninsula, Russia by Multidate Remote SensingRigina, Olga2002

Environmental Impact Assessment of the Mining and Concentration Activities in the Kola Peninsula, Russia by Multidate Remote Sensing

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

On the Kola Peninsula, the mining and concentration industry exerts anthropogenic impact on the environment. Tailing dumps cause airborne pollution through dusting, and waterborne pollution due to direct dumping and accidental releases. The objectives were: (1) to analyse multidate satellite imagesfor 1964–1996 to assess the environmental pollution from themining and concentration activity in the Kola in temporal perspective; (2) to evaluate remote sensing methods for integrated environmental impact assessment. • The area of mining and industrial sites steadily expands and amounted to 94 km2 in 1996. • The polluted water surface amounted to at least 150 km2 through dumping in 1978 and to 106 km2 in1986 due to dusting. Thus, the impact from the mining and concentration activity should be reconsidered as more significant than it was officially anticipated. • In the past the main mechanism of pollution wasdirect dumping into the lakes. Currently and in future, airborne pollution after dusting storms will dominate. The effective recultivation of the tailing dumps will be a long-term process. • For effective assessment of impacts from the mining and concentration industry, remote sensing methods should be complemented by in-situ measurements, fieldwork, and mathematical modelling.

Authors

Rigina, Olga

Year Published

2002

Publication

Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

Locations
DOI

10.1023/A:1014248522919

Mining and environmental change in Sierra Leone, West Africa: a remote sensing and hydrogeomorphological studyAkiwumi, Fenda A.2008

Mining and environmental change in Sierra Leone, West Africa: a remote sensing and hydrogeomorphological study

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

This paper evaluates the environmental changes in southwestern Sierra Leone, West Africa from rutile (titanium dioxide) between 1967 and 1995. Mining in peripheral parts of the world economy is a consequence of larger global economic interests. Historically, long-distance trade and export production of minerals and other natural resources primarily for the benefit of core countries are responsible for transforming the natural environment and landscapes of peripheral sectors of the world economy. Tracking environmental change in developing countries such as Sierra Leone is challenging because of financial and infrastructural constraints on the use of ground methods of evaluation and monitoring. Remote sensing data are invaluable in assessing the human dimensions of Land Use and Land Cover Change (LULCC) with implications for political ecology. Using available multi-date infrared Landsat images supplemented with field hydrological and biophysical data, we monitored the rapid temporal and spatial dynamic characteristic of mining areas in the study area with a focus on physical changes to the landscape. Reservoir construction for mining has caused flooding of alluvial lowlands, deforestation, and the creation of tailings and stockpiles over mined-out portions of the lease. Although the study was conducted at a local scale, it represents the broad, regional, past-to-present manner by which global economic interests exploit natural resources and impact the environment in distant places.

Authors

Akiwumi, Fenda A. and Butler, David R.

Year Published

2008

Publication

Environmental Monitoring and Assessment

Locations
DOI

10.1007/s10661-007-9930-9

Monitoring Spatial and Temporal Land Use/Cover Changes; a Case Study in Western Black Sea Region of TurkeyAlkan, M.2013

Monitoring Spatial and Temporal Land Use/Cover Changes; a Case Study in Western Black Sea Region of Turkey

Keywords

Landsat, Classification, Temporal change, Remote sensing, GIS

Abstract

Rapid land use/land cover changes have taken place in many cities of Turkey. Land use and land cover changes are essential for wide range of applications. In this study, Landsat TM satellite imageries date from 1987, 1993, 2000 and 2010 were used to analyse temporal and spatial changes in the Western Black Sea Region of Turkey. Zonguldak and Eregli two largest and economic important cities which have been active coal mining and iron fabric areas. Maximum Likelihood Classification technique was implemented and the results were represented in classes of open area, forest, agricultural, water, mining, urban and pollution in the sea. Urban areas on both cities increased from 1987 to 2010. The agricultural and open areas from 1987 to 2010 decreased in parallel to land use and land cover change in both cities. Meanwhile, forest areas increased continuously with about 20 % from 1987 to 2010 in both cities. As industrial activity, the coal fields doubled from 1987 to 2010.

Authors

Alkan, M., Oruc, M., Yildirim, Y., Seker, D. Z. and Jacobsen, K.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing

Locations
DOI

10.1007/s12524-012-0227-2

Land use/ land cover change monitoring is part of Jaintia Hills Meghalaya using remote sensing techniquesSemwal, D.P.2005

Land use/ land cover change monitoring is part of Jaintia Hills Meghalaya using remote sensing techniques

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Semwal, D.P., Pant, D.N., Roy, P.S. and Naithani, Varsha

Year Published

2005

Publication

The Indian Forester

Locations
Mapping mine tailing surface mineralogy using hyperspectral remote sensingShang, Jiali2014

Mapping mine tailing surface mineralogy using hyperspectral remote sensing

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Acid mine drainage resulting from mine tailings poses an environmental threat. An important initial step towards the reclamation of mine tailing sites is to detect the presence of acid-generating, sulphide-rich minerals and determine their spatial distribution. In this study, the potential of hyperspectral remote sensing for characterizing mine tailings is investigated. The study site is located in northern Ontario, Canada, and the data were collected with PROBE-1, an imaging spectrometer that covers the visible, near-infrared, and shortwave-infrared spectral ranges. The results indicate that using the weakly constrained linear spectral unmixing technique PROBE-1 data can provide information on mineral compositions of the tailing surface. The spatial locations and associations of acid-generating source minerals such as pyrite and pyrrhotite along with their oxidation products (e.g., copiapite, jarosite, ferrihydrite, goethite, and hematite) can provide information about the distribution of oxidation processes at the site. This remote mapping technique can be very valuable when attempting to identify abandoned mine-waste sites and the potential risk they might present where there are no a priori knowledge and field samples available.

Authors

Shang, Jiali, Morris, Bill, Howarth, Philip, Lévesque, Josée, Staenz, Karl and Neville, Bob

Year Published

2014

Publication

Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing

Locations
DOI

10.5589/m10-001

Landsat imagery for surface-mine inventoryA., Anderson,1977

Landsat imagery for surface-mine inventory

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

A., Anderson,, D., Schultz,, N., Buchman, and H., Nock,

Year Published

1977

Publication

Photogrammetric Engineering and Remote Sensing

Locations
Changes in the extent of surface mining and reclamation in the Central Appalachians detected using a 1976–2006 Landsat time seriesTownsend, Philip A.2009

Changes in the extent of surface mining and reclamation in the Central Appalachians detected using a 1976–2006 Landsat time series

Keywords

Surface mining; Mine reclamation; Landsat; Remote sensing; Land use land cover change; Runoff; SMCRA

Abstract

Surface mining and reclamation is the dominant driver of land cover land use change (LCLUC) in the Central Appalachian Mountain region of the Eastern U.S. Accurate quantification of the extent of mining activities is important for assessing how this LCLUC affects ecosystem services such as aesthetics, biodiversity, and mitigation of flooding. We used Landsat imagery from 1976, 1987, 1999 and 2006 to map the extent of surface mines and mine reclamation for eight large watersheds in the Central Appalachian region of West Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania. We employed standard image processing techniques in conjunction with a temporal decision tree and GIS maps of mine permits and wetlands to map active and reclaimed mines and track changes through time. For the entire study area, active surface mine extent was highest in 1976, prior to implementation of the Surface Mine Control and Reclamation Act in 1977, with 1.76% of the study area in active mines, declining to 0.44% in 2006. The most extensively mined watershed, Georges Creek in Maryland, was 5.45% active mines in 1976, declining to 1.83% in 2006. For the entire study area, the area of reclaimed mines increased from 1.35% to 4.99% from 1976 to 2006, and from 4.71% to 15.42% in Georges Creek. Land cover conversion to mines and then reclaimed mines after 1976 was almost exclusively from forest. Accuracy levels for mined and reclaimed cover was above 85% for all time periods, and was generally above 80% for mapping active and reclaimed mines separately, especially for the later time periods in which good accuracy assessment data were available. Among other implications, the mapped patterns of LCLUC are likely to significantly affect watershed hydrology, as mined and reclaimed areas have lower infiltration capacity and thus more rapid runoff than unmined forest watersheds, leading to greater potential for extreme flooding during heavy rainfall events.

Authors

Townsend, Philip A., Helmers, David P., Kingdon, Clayton C., McNeil, Brenden E., de Beurs, Kirsten M. and Eshleman, Keith N.

Year Published

2009

Publication

Remote Sensing of Environment

Locations
DOI

10.1016/j.rse.2008.08.012

Rehabilitation of Vegetation Mapping of ATB Opencast Coal-Mine Based on GIS and RSBao, Nisha2012

Rehabilitation of Vegetation Mapping of ATB Opencast Coal-Mine Based on GIS and RS

Keywords

Remote Sensing, Mining, Reclamation, Vegetation.

Abstract

Opencast coal mining has a large impact on the surrounding landscape. Original ecosystems are disturbed, and the restoration of vegetation is necessary. How to obtain effectively vegetation growth effectively under coal exploitation stress is always a detection problem in monitoring a mining environment. ATB open mine began mining at 1987 with a 92-year production life, and the mining area is about 60 square kilometers, which has 5 dumps at present. The reclamation projection has been more than 20 years since 1988, and the reclamation work takes every 2 or 3 years with the reshaping and rehabilitation of dumps. In 2005, two dumps (south dump and west dump) have been reclaimed completely. The paper is aimed to monitor vegetation species on reclaimed dumps using Quickbird remote sensing image of 2006 in order to evaluate a long-term land reclamation strategy and impact. The vegetation on reclaimed dumps is mapped based on the high resolution image, DEM data and field survey. This study focuses on feasible conditions of vegetation through analyzing the vegetation landscape and succession, and then reveals vegetation types which are suitable for mining conditions. There are 24 types of vegetation at reclaimed ATB open mine dumps The locust and Hippophae rhamnoides as pioneer plant plays a key role in the mining ecological restoration, and Shrub on the bank can prevent from water loss and soil erosion effectively. The revegetation spatial and temporal variabilities could help the species chosen in the next land reclamation plan.

Authors

Bao, Nisha, Ye, Baoying and Bai, Zhongke

Year Published

2012

Publication

Sensor Letters

Locations
DOI

10.1166/sl.2012.1895

Impacts of coal mining subsidence on the surface landscape in Longkou city, Shandong Province of ChinaQuanyuan, Wu2009

Impacts of coal mining subsidence on the surface landscape in Longkou city, Shandong Province of China

Keywords

GIS, Remote sensing, Coal mine subsidence, Landscape pattern

Abstract

Coal mining subsidence is a common human geological disaster that was particularly conspicuous in China. It seriously restricts the sustainable development of mining areas, and it not only damages land resources but also triggers a series of ecological and environmental problems that may result in social and economic issues. This report studied the coal mining subsidence area of Longkou in Shandong province and uses digital elevation data (DEM) of the mining area before subsidence in 1978 as the baseline elevation. Through image algorithms, we obtained coal mining subsidence region data for 1984, 1996, 2000, and 2004. And with spatial data sources of the same period of TM/ETM+ and SPOT5 remote sensing images, BP artificial neural network (BPNN) classification is used to extract surface landscape information in the subsidence area. With the support of GIS technology, superimposing subsidence area on the surface landscape—using the largest landscape ecology patch index, landscape shape index, landscape condensation index, and the index of landscape distribution—report analyzes the mining landscape changes before and after subsidence. This study also carries on exploratory research with the landscape changes, thereby providing a scientific basis for integrated prevention and treatment.

Authors

Quanyuan, Wu, Jiewu, Pang, Shanzhong, Qi, Yiping, Li, Congcong, Han, Tingxiang, Liu and Limei, Huang

Year Published

2009

Publication

Environmental Earth Sciences

Locations
DOI

10.1007/s12665-009-0074-9

Recent Articles

Mapping Mine Tailing Surface Mineralogy Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

by Shang, Jiali, Morris, Bill, Howarth, Philip, Lévesque, Josée, Staenz, Karl and Neville, Bob

Acid mine drainage resulting from mine tailings poses an environmental threat. An important initial step towards the reclamation of mine tailing sites is to detect the presence of acid-generating, sulphide-rich minerals and determine their spatial distribution. In this study, the potential of hyperspectral remote sensing for characterizing mine tailings is investigated. The study site is locate...

published 2014 in Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing

Monitoring Spatial and Temporal Land Use/cover Changes; a Case Study in Western Black Sea Region of Turkey

by Alkan, M., Oruc, M., Yildirim, Y., Seker, D. Z. and Jacobsen, K.

Rapid land use/land cover changes have taken place in many cities of Turkey. Land use and land cover changes are essential for wide range of applications. In this study, Landsat TM satellite imageries date from 1987, 1993, 2000 and 2010 were used to analyse temporal and spatial changes in the Western Black Sea Region of Turkey. Zonguldak and Eregli two largest and economic important cities whic...

published 2013 in Journal of the Indian Society of Remote Sensing


Ecological Effects Analysis of Land Use Change in Coal Mining Area Based on Ecosystem Service Valuing: a Case Study in Jiawang

by Bian, Zhengfu and Lu, Qingqing

Land use change is one of the uppermost driving forces of regional ecosystem change, and has a huge impact on the environmental balance. Mining areas with intensive resources exploitation and utilization have undergone different kinds of environmental influences, such as water pollution and land use cover change. The extensive coal mining in China has led to significant regional land use change...

published 2013 in Environmental Earth Sciences

Delineation of Coalfield Surface Fires by Thresholding Landsat Tm-7 Day-Time Image Data

by Raju, Ashwani, Gupta, Ravi P. and Prakash, Anupma

Surface fires are common in coalfields where coal is mined or exposed to sunlight for long durations of time. The heat energy emitted from these fires affects the signal recorded by sensors operating in the shortwave infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The Landsat TM/ETM+ band-7 is sensitive to solar reflected radiation as well as emitted radiation from a target. The ‘maximum sola...

published 2013 in Geocarto International