Small

Articles published from 2007-2013.

Description

An international journal publishing original research and reviews in evolutionary and general biology, and on the interaction of organisms with their environment. While maintaining a tradition of featuring classical taxonomic work in entomology and zoology and thereby providing a scientific basis for the application of systematics in biological control, agriculture, aquaculture, and medical and veterinary zoology, the journal also publishes papers on cladistics, experimental taxonomy, parasitology, ecology and behaviour. Papers which simply describe a single new species are not normally acceptable without additional justification.

latest article added on October 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Foraging ecology of the giant Amazonian ant Dinoponera gigantea (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Ponerinae): activity schedule, diet and spatial foraging patternsFourcassié, Vincent2002

Foraging ecology of the giant Amazonian ant Dinoponera gigantea (Hymenoptera, Formicidae, Ponerinae): activity schedule, diet and spatial foraging patterns

Keywords

Activity Rhythms;Ants;Dinoponera;Formicidae;Ponerinae;Spatial Foraging Patterns;Territorial Contests

Abstract

This study provides a detailed account of the natural history and foraging biology of the ponerine ant Dinoponera gigantea in a rainforest in north Brazil. The species nests on the ground and the colonies contain 70–96 workers. Ant activity is negatively correlated with temperature, and is more intense at dawn and dusk. Foragers leave the nest independently and search for food individually on the leaf litter, within ca 10 m around the nest. Workers are opportunistic feeders that collect seeds and fruits, and hunt for live prey as well as scavenge for dead animal matter. The dry weight of food items ranges from <10 mg (spiders, insect parts) to >400 mg (seeds, fruits). There is no nestmate recruitment during the search for or retrieval of food, irrespective of food type and size. Foragers have a high directional fidelity, and ants from neighbouring colonies may engage in ritualized territorial contests at the border of their foraging areas. The foraging ecology of D. gigantea is compared with other ponerine species living in tropical forests, as well as with other ant groups showing similar behavioural patterns.

Authors

Fourcassié, Vincent, Oliveira, Paulo S.

Year Published

2002

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222930110097149

This article contributed by:

Original

I.—On a new Oscillatoria, the colouring substance of Glaslough Lake, IrelandDrummond, James L.1838

I.—On a new Oscillatoria, the colouring substance of Glaslough Lake, Ireland

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

No abstract available

Authors

Drummond, James L.

Year Published

1838

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222933809496605

This article contributed by:

Original

New and little-known benthic pycnogonids from North CarolinaMcCloskey, L.R.1967

New and little-known benthic pycnogonids from North Carolina

Keywords

No keywords available

Abstract

Summary A new genus and three new species of Ammotheid pycnogonids are described from waters off North Carolina, U.S.A. The Ammotheids new to science are Nymphopsis dromedaria, Nanymphon grasslei (gen. n.), and Ascorhynchus pyrginospinum. Eurycyde clitellaria Stock, known only from the type collected in the Virgin Islands, has also been recorded. The range of a fifth species, Pycnogonum cessaci Bouvier (family Pycnogonidae), is extended to include the Western North Atlantic. Comments are made on the ecology and associated organisms of the five species. A modified key to the known species of Nymphopsis is included.

Authors

McCloskey, L.R.

Year Published

1967

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222936700770681

This article contributed by:

Original

Taxonomy of the family Bethylidae (Hymenoptera: Chrysidoidea) from Cambodia and adjacent countries. I. Genus Odontepyris Kieffer (Bethylidae: Bethylinae) with four new species and two new recordsLim, Jongok2013

Taxonomy of the family Bethylidae (Hymenoptera: Chrysidoidea) from Cambodia and adjacent countries. I. Genus Odontepyris Kieffer (Bethylidae: Bethylinae) with four new species and two new records

Keywords

Bethylidae, new record, new species, Odontepyris Kieffer, Oriental region

Abstract

Six Odontepyris species are taxonomically treated. Four new species, O. acutus Lim, sp. nov., O. cardamomensis Lim, sp. nov. and O. concavus Lim, sp. nov. from Cambodia, and O. prolatus Lim, sp. nov. from Cambodia and Thailand are described. Odontepyris muesebecki Krombein from Cambodia, India and Thailand and O. formosicola Terayama from Cambodia, are newly recorded. Descriptions for four new species, diagnoses for two newly recorded species, and photographs of diagnostic characteristics for each species are presented. A key to Cambodian species of Odontepyris is also provided with their distributional records in Oriental region. http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:6BA54D20-8EA6-4F3A-9798-D1BDE9833B0B

Authors

Lim, Jongok and Lee, Seunghwan

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222933.2012.763057

This article contributed by:

Original

The first Leptanilloides species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Leptanilloidinae) from eastern South AmericaSilva, R. R.2013

The first Leptanilloides species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Leptanilloidinae) from eastern South America

Keywords

ants, Atlantic Forest, taxonomy, disjunct distribution, Brazil

Abstract

We describe a species of the exclusively Neotropical dorylomorph ant genus Leptanilloides (Leptanilloidinae), Leptanilloides atlantica sp. nov., based on workers collected in the Atlantic Forest, São Paulo, south-eastern Brazil. The 11 species of Leptanilloides described are known from relatively high altitudes in western America (from the Andes foothills in Bolivia to Sierra Morena in Mexico). The discovery of a Leptanilloides species in south-eastern Brazil represents a significant range extension for the genus; this new species shares characters with Leptanilloides biconstricta (Bolivia), Leptanilloides femoralis (Venezuela) and Leptanilloides gracilis (Mexico) and may be distinguished based on a combination of traits. The hypogaeic habits of Leptanilloidinae combined with inefficient collecting techniques may explain the paucity of information and of specimens of this group in most museum collections as well as its present apparent disjunct distribution. We compare Leptanilloides distribution to that of other organisms that show similar disjunct patterns in the Andes and montane sites in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:E7E334AA-58C0-455D-A0A6-724D29226DD0

Authors

Silva, R. R., Feitosa, R. M., Brandão, C. R.F. and Freitas, A. V.L.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222933.2012.763058

This article contributed by:

Original

Iranian Cunaxidae (Acari: Prostigmata: Bdelloidea). Part III. Subfamily Cunaxoidinaeden Heyer, Jacob2013

Iranian Cunaxidae (Acari: Prostigmata: Bdelloidea). Part III. Subfamily Cunaxoidinae

Keywords

Cunaxidae, Cunaxoidinae, Iran, Palaearctic, Cunaxoides, Lupaeus, Pulaeus, taxonomy

Abstract

This third part on Iranian mites of the subfamily Cunaxoidinae discusses eight species. Five are new: Cunaxoides decastroae sp. nov., Cunaxoides lootsi sp. nov., Pulaeus razanensis sp. nov., Lupaeus iranensis sp. nov. and Lupaeus sativae sp. nov. Lupaeus martini (Den Heyer, 1981), Lupaeus valentinae Sergeyenko and the male of Pulaeus krama (Chaudhri, 1977) are recorded for the first time from Iran. Descriptions, figures and a key to the Iranian Cunaxoidinae are provided. http://www.zoobank.org/urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:6462FED6-9314-4FD7-A524-44666B40A64F

Authors

den Heyer, Jacob, Ueckermann, Edward A. and Khanjani, Mohammad

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222933.2012.763060

This article contributed by:

Original

Aliquid novi ex Africa? Lamyctes africanus (Porath, 1871) found in Europe (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Henicopidae)Enghoff, Henrik2013

Aliquid novi ex Africa? Lamyctes africanus (Porath, 1871) found in Europe (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Henicopidae)

Keywords

centipede, Denmark, introduced species, taxonomy, parthenogenesis

Abstract

Lamyctes africanus Porath, 1871) was collected from several localities in Denmark in 2011 – the first records of the species in outdoor habitats in Europe. Based on Danish specimens, which are all females, suggesting parthenogenesis, L. africanus is re-described and compared with Lamyctes emarginatus (Newport, 1844). Several previous records of L. africanus are shown probably to concern other species. An account of species distribution and habitats suggests a typical pioneering species. The taxonomy of the genus Lamyctes is discussed, including a detailed account of the use of antennomere number in species description and a key to the four European Lamyctes species. Two mitochondrial genes, 16S and COI from Danish specimens are sequenced and analysed but do not contribute to clarifying the identity of the species.

Authors

Enghoff, Henrik, Akkari, Nesrine and Pedersen, Jan

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222933.2012.763062

This article contributed by:

Original

Environmental humidity and leaf-litter depth affecting ecological parameters of a leaf-litter frog community in an Atlantic Rainforest areaRocha, Carlos Frederico Duarte2013

Environmental humidity and leaf-litter depth affecting ecological parameters of a leaf-litter frog community in an Atlantic Rainforest area

Keywords

Anuran, density, species richness, biomass, Serra das Torres

Abstract

We studied a leaf-litter frog community from an Atlantic Rainforest area in the state of Espírito Santo, south-eastern Brazil. Frogs were sampled using 4 × 4-m plots. We recorded 348 individuals from 13 species. The estimated overall density of leaf-litter frogs in the study area was 6.6 frogs/100 m2 with an estimated overall frog biomass of 0.04 g/ha. Brachycephalus didactylus was the species with the highest estimated density and highest abundance. Five of the litter frog species recorded are considered endemic to the Atlantic Forest and two species are endemic to the state of Espírito Santo, including Euparkerella robusta, which is considered threatened as the result of habitat loss. The overall abundance of leaf litter was positively related to relative humidity and depth of the leaf litter. The relationship between frog body mass and frog abundance was significant, suggesting that a general biological trend in this relationship occurs in our study area.

Authors

Rocha, Carlos Frederico Duarte, Oliveira, Jane C.F., Pralon, Edicarlos, Coco, Lívia and Pagotto, Renata V.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222933.2013.769641

This article contributed by:

Original

Reproductive pattern in the southernmost populations of South American redbelly toadsCairo, Samanta L.2013

Reproductive pattern in the southernmost populations of South American redbelly toads

Keywords

explosive breeding, operational sex ratio, Melanophryniscus, Pampean grasslands, Argentina

Abstract

Anurans can be classified as explosive or prolonged breeders. In species with short breeding periods, intensive competition for females is expected. We analyse the temporal breeding pattern of Melanophryniscus aff. montevidensis, a bufonid inhabiting grasslands of Argentina, whose breeding is concentrated in events of short duration. Males are active during more than one breeding event per season, whereas most females take part in a single event per season. Active males outnumbered females by up to 14 times at one event, operational sex ratio (OSR) ranged from 0.07 to 0.75 and intensity of sexual selection (I s) from 0.69 to 24. We found a negative association between I s and OSR, but no correlation between number of active males per event and OSR or I s. The OSR is the key that regulates the intensity of sexual selection, nevertheless, and in spite of being explosive breeders, females would potentially have chances to select their mate.

Authors

Cairo, Samanta L., Zalba, Sergio M. and Úbeda, Carmen A.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222933.2013.769644

This article contributed by:

Original

Occupancy patterns of Megascops asio in urban parks of New York City and southern Westchester County, NY, USANagy, Christopher M.2013

Occupancy patterns of Megascops asio in urban parks of New York City and southern Westchester County, NY, USA

Keywords

eastern screech owl, Megascops asio, urban wildlife, occupancy

Abstract

Eastern screech owls (Megascops asio) exist in a number of urban parks in New York City (NYC) and Westchester County, NY. To investigate the effects of intense urbanization on this species, we performed call-broadcast surveys in 16 parks in NYC and Westchester. Occupancy and detection were modelled as functions of eight geographic variables and the presence of barred (Strix varia) and great horned (Bubo virgineanus) owls was noted. Detection was lower in parks that had larger owls. Percent impervious cover and percent forest cover of buffer zones were the most important predictors of occupancy. Screech owls can persist in parks in urbanized areas, but long-term persistence appears to be limited by high levels of urbanization (>50–60% impervious cover), even around otherwise suitable parks, probably because recolonization of extirpated sites in these areas is unlikely. Hence, characteristics of the urban matrix around parks were strong determinants of occupancy by eastern screech owls in these parks.

Authors

Nagy, Christopher M. and Rockwell, Robert F.

Year Published

2013

Publication

Journal of Natural History

Locations
DOI

10.1080/00222933.2013.770100

This article contributed by:

Original

Recent Articles

Taxonomy of the Family Bethylidae (hymenoptera: Chrysidoidea) from Cambodia and Adjacent Countries. I. Genus Odontepyris Kieffer (bethylidae: Bethylinae) with Four New Species and Two New Records

by Lim, Jongok and Lee, Seunghwan

Six Odontepyris species are taxonomically treated. Four new species, O. acutus Lim, sp. nov., O. cardamomensis Lim, sp. nov. and O. concavus Lim, sp. nov. from Cambodia, and O. prolatus Lim, sp. nov. from Cambodia and Thailand are described. Odontepyris muesebecki Krombein from Cambodia, India and Thailand and O. formosicola Terayama from Cambodia, are newly recorded. Descriptions for four new ...

published 2013 in Journal of Natural History

The First Leptanilloides Species (hymenoptera: Formicidae: Leptanilloidinae) from Eastern South America

by Silva, R. R., Feitosa, R. M., Brandão, C. R.F. and Freitas, A. V.L.

We describe a species of the exclusively Neotropical dorylomorph ant genus Leptanilloides (Leptanilloidinae), Leptanilloides atlantica sp. nov., based on workers collected in the Atlantic Forest, São Paulo, south-eastern Brazil. The 11 species of Leptanilloides described are known from relatively high altitudes in western America (from the Andes foothills in Bolivia to Sierra Morena in Mexico)....

published 2013 in Journal of Natural History


Iranian Cunaxidae (acari: Prostigmata: Bdelloidea). Part Iii. Subfamily Cunaxoidinae

by den Heyer, Jacob, Ueckermann, Edward A. and Khanjani, Mohammad

This third part on Iranian mites of the subfamily Cunaxoidinae discusses eight species. Five are new: Cunaxoides decastroae sp. nov., Cunaxoides lootsi sp. nov., Pulaeus razanensis sp. nov., Lupaeus iranensis sp. nov. and Lupaeus sativae sp. nov. Lupaeus martini (Den Heyer, 1981), Lupaeus valentinae Sergeyenko and the male of Pulaeus krama (Chaudhri, 1977) are recorded for the first time from I...

published 2013 in Journal of Natural History

Aliquid Novi Ex Africa? Lamyctes Africanus (porath, 1871) Found in Europe (chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Henicopidae)

by Enghoff, Henrik, Akkari, Nesrine and Pedersen, Jan

Lamyctes africanus Porath, 1871) was collected from several localities in Denmark in 2011 – the first records of the species in outdoor habitats in Europe. Based on Danish specimens, which are all females, suggesting parthenogenesis, L. africanus is re-described and compared with Lamyctes emarginatus (Newport, 1844). Several previous records of L. africanus are shown probably to concern other s...

published 2013 in Journal of Natural History