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Articles published from 1984-2014.

Description

Publishes original articles and commentaries on research in the fields of fundamental and applied soil and plant science. Original research papers, short communications including germplasm registrations, relevant book reviews, commentaries on papers recently published and, exceptionally, review articles will be considered for publication in the Journal. Manuscripts considered will address aspects of: Agronomical and Horticultural research including breeding and genetics, cultivar evaluation, management, nutrition, physiology, production, and quality; Soil Science research including biology, chemistry, classification, fertility, mineralogy, pedology and hydropedology, physics, and soil and land evaluation of agricultural and urban ecosystems; Weed Science research including biological control agents, biology, ecology, genetics, herbicide resistance and herbicide-resistant crops, and physiology and molecular action of herbicides and plant growth regulators; Agro-climatology; Agro-ecology; Forage, Pasture and Turfgrass science including production and utilisation; Plant and Soil Systems Modelling; Plant–Microbe Interactions; Plant–Pest Interactions; and Plant–Soil Relationships.

latest article added on October 2013

ArticleFirst AuthorPublished
Effect of herbicides on survival of rhizobia and nodulation of peas, groundnuts and lucernevan Rensburg, H. Jansen1984

Effect of herbicides on survival of rhizobia and nodulation of peas, groundnuts and lucerne

Keywords

Herbicides, legumes, nodulation, rhizobia, toxicity

Abstract

Thirteen herbicides were tested for toxicity against strains of Rhizobium used in South African legume inoculants for lucerne, clover, soybeans, groundnuts and lupins, respectively. Each of alachlor, bromoxynil, proprop, metolachlor, naptalam + dinoseb, and trifluralin inhibited at least two of the strains after a contact period of ca 10 s. No strain survived 42 h in contact with any of these herbicides. Atrazine and terbutryn were relatively non-toxic. The slow-growing strains of Rhizobium japonicum, Rhizobium lupini and Rhizobium sp. (groundnuts) were less affected by at least two of the herbicides tested than strains of the fast-growing R. meliloti and R. trifolii. Toxicity of a herbicide to rhizobia in vitro did not necessarily correlate with its effect on nodulation and some are considered suitable for field application. S. Afr. J. Plant Soil 1984, 1: 135–138

Authors

van Rensburg, H. Jansen and Strijdom, B. W.

Year Published

1984

Publication

South African Journal of Plant and Soil

Locations
    DOI

    10.1080/02571862.1984.10634128

    This article contributed by:

    Original

    Influence of temperature and daylength on the phenological development of annual Medicago species with particular reference to M. truncatula, cv. Jemalongvan Heerden, J. M.1984

    Influence of temperature and daylength on the phenological development of annual Medicago species with particular reference to M. truncatula, cv. Jemalong

    Keywords

    Daylength, flowering date, mathematical model, Medicago-spp., pasture legumes, temperature, vernalization

    Abstract

    In a glasshouse and two growth-room trials, carried out in conjunction with 12 serial plantings in pots in the open, it was found that the phenological development of Medicago truncatula, M. tornata, M. aculeata, M. polymorpha, M. scutellata and M. littoralis cultivars differed markedly in response to vernalization. In M. truncatula cv. Jemalong daylength interacted strongly with vernalization. Using the data of the 12 serial plantings, a mathematical model was developed to predict the period from emergence to flowering using daylength and temperature inputs. Because of the differential influence of temperature and daylength on different genotypes it was concluded that a separate model would have to be developed for each cultivar. S. Afr. J. Plant Soil 1984, 1: 73–78

    Authors

    van Heerden, J. M.

    Year Published

    1984

    Publication

    South African Journal of Plant and Soil

    Locations
    DOI

    10.1080/02571862.1984.10634113

    This article contributed by:

    Original

    Growth and production of Vicia dasycarpa Ten., Namoi as influenced by an oat support crop and nitrogen fertilizerWassermann, V. D.1984

    Growth and production of Vicia dasycarpa Ten., Namoi as influenced by an oat support crop and nitrogen fertilizer

    Keywords

    Nitrogen, oats, support crop, Vicia dasycarpa

    Abstract

    The performance of Vicia dasycarpa cv. Namoi in pure stand and mixed with oats at four densities, grown at three levels of N fertilizer, was studied in the field under irrigation. Both the increased plant density of oats and N fertilizer reduced the percentage vetch in the mixtures. However, the percentage vetch in all mixtures increased as the growing season progressed. Compared to pure vetch, admixing oats increased total yields significantly, and the mixtures also responded positively to N application. On the other hand, the different treatments did not differ significantly in total crude protein production. It was concluded that Namoi is an excellent legume for combining with oats for high yields of good quality fodder. S. Ah. J. Plant Soil 1984, 1: 79–82

    Authors

    Wassermann, V. D., Heyns, Gillian and Kruger, A. J.

    Year Published

    1984

    Publication

    South African Journal of Plant and Soil

    Locations
    DOI

    10.1080/02571862.1984.10634114

    This article contributed by:

    Original

    Assessment of aluminium tolerance in maize using a rapid screening procedureMendes, Paula1984

    Assessment of aluminium tolerance in maize using a rapid screening procedure

    Keywords

    Aluminium tolerance, maize cultivars

    Abstract

    Routine testing for Al tolerance requires that screening procedures be both rapid and simple. Growth-chamber techniques, developed in the USA, show considerable promise in this regard and were used in this study to compare the Al tolerance of 10 maize cultivars and to test the reliability of several plant performance indices proposed in the literature. Seedlings were grown under controlled environmental conditions in complete nutrient solutions, with and without Al. Visual assessment of roots grown in the presence of Al facilitated separation of the cultivars into three groups. RS5205, SR52, CG4801 and PNR394 were classed as ‘good’; SSM2039, SNK2147, and SABI308 as ‘intermediate’; and A475W, RO422 and TX390 as ‘poor’. Visual assessments, total root length measurements and indices obtained using the primary seminal root provided measures of Al tolerance in good agreement with field performance. Topgrowth and root mass were poorly related to plant performance and relative indices obtained using root measurements in the presence and absence of Al were markedly inferior to indices obtained from Al solutions alone. The suggestion is made that screening could possibly be successfully performed using visual root ratings. Inclusion of standard genotypes would eliminate much of the subjectivity associated with such procedures. S. Afr. J. Plant Soil 1984, 1: 83–86

    Authors

    Mendes, Paula, Farina, M. P.W. and Channon, P.

    Year Published

    1984

    Publication

    South African Journal of Plant and Soil

    Locations
      DOI

      10.1080/02571862.1984.10634115

      This article contributed by:

      Original

      Effect of moisture supply on CAM in Opuntia aurantiaca (jointed cactus)Whiting, B. H.1984

      Effect of moisture supply on CAM in Opuntia aurantiaca (jointed cactus)

      Keywords

      CAM, gas exchange, jointed cactus, moisture stress, Opuntia aurantiaca

      Abstract

      The patterns of gas exchange exhibited by Opuntia aurantiaca under controlled conditions (photoperiod 12 h; day/night temperature regime 30/15°C) were investigated for plants subjected to various levels of moisture stress. Unstressed plants exhibited a typical full-CAM pattern of gas exchange in which all four phases of CAM-linked CO2 exchange were evident. Net CO2 uptake during phase 1 contributed up to 82% of total carbon fixed per 24 h. The transpiration: photosynthesis ratio was low (night 31; day 135), within the range exhibited by many CAM plants and indicative of a high water use efficiency. Under all conditions of water stress net carbon gain was reduced with phase IV showing the greatest reduction and phase 1 the least. On watering, stressed plants recovered rapidly. Within 48 h of receiving water total CO2 uptake per 24 h had risen from 5,8% to 76,5% of the unstressed value. S. Afr. J. Plant Soil 1984, 1: 87–91

      Authors

      Whiting, B. H. and Campbell, E. E.

      Year Published

      1984

      Publication

      South African Journal of Plant and Soil

      Locations
      DOI

      10.1080/02571862.1984.10634116

      This article contributed by:

      Original

      Seisoensveranderinge in die koolhidraatinhoud van jong appelbomeStassen, P. J.C.1984

      Seisoensveranderinge in die koolhidraatinhoud van jong appelbome

      Keywords

      Apple trees, carbohydrates, hemicellulose, starch, sugar

      Abstract

      Gereelde ontledings van die koolhidraatfraksies in jong appelbome het getoon dat suiker 'n relatief klein gedeelte van die koolhidrate in die boomdele uitmaak, en veral in die wortels voorkom. Stysel akkumuleer in die wortels tot finale blaarval in die winter, waarna 'n afname in styselinhoud begin, en voortduur tot ongeveer sewe weke na bottyd. Hemisellulose kom in groot hoeveelhede in die houtweefsel voor waar dit hoofsaaklik struktureel van aard is. Dit wil voorkom asof hemisellulose gedurende die herfs in die wortelweefsel gemobiliseer word, moontlik om aktiefgroeiende haarwortels te onderhou. S.-Afr. Tydskr. Plant Grond 1984, 1: 92–95

      Authors

      Stassen, P. J.C.

      Year Published

      1984

      Publication

      South African Journal of Plant and Soil

      Locations
      DOI

      10.1080/02571862.1984.10634117

      This article contributed by:

      Original

      Effect of soil fertility on the vegetative growth, yield and water use of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)Annandale, J. G.1984

      Effect of soil fertility on the vegetative growth, yield and water use of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

      Keywords

      Leaf area duration, soil fertility, Triticum aestivum(L.), water-use efficiency, wheat

      Abstract

      Well-fertilized wheat was found to use more water than wheat on poorly fertilized plots, but the yield was increased, resulting in increased water-use efficiency. Variations in leaf area duration after anthesis accounted for 81% of the variation in yield.

      Authors

      Annandale, J. G., Hammes, P. S. and Nel, P. C.

      Year Published

      1984

      Publication

      South African Journal of Plant and Soil

      Locations
      DOI

      10.1080/02571862.1984.10634118

      This article contributed by:

      Original

      Effect of the amount of surface maize residue on infiltration and soil loss from a clay loam soilLang, P. M.1984

      Effect of the amount of surface maize residue on infiltration and soil loss from a clay loam soil

      Keywords

      Erosion, infiltration, maize residue, mulch, rainfall simulator, soil loss

      Abstract

      Six levels of maize stover, expressed as percentage ground cover (0–75%) were compared under a rainfall simulator to assess the effect of surface residues on infiltration and soil loss on a clay loam soil with a 3,5% slope. Increasing the percentage ground cover resulted in increased infiltration and was even more effective in controlling soil loss. Under the experimental conditions a minimum residue ground cover of 30% was required to keep runoff and soil loss within acceptable limits.

      Authors

      Lang, P. M. and Mallett, J. B.

      Year Published

      1984

      Publication

      South African Journal of Plant and Soil

      Locations
      DOI

      10.1080/02571862.1984.10634119

      This article contributed by:

      Original

      Relationship between cation exchange capacity, clay content and water retention of Highveld soilsLambooy, Astrid M.1984

      Relationship between cation exchange capacity, clay content and water retention of Highveld soils

      Keywords

      Water retention, cation exchange capacity, clay content

      Abstract

      Water in the soil is held by capillary and adsorption forces. These forces are mainly a function of clay content and mineralogy. To neglect the influence of clay mineralogy when estimating the water-holding properties of soil, implies that only a part of these forces is considered. It is convenient to use some easily measurable soil property to quantify the effect of clay mineralogy, In this study cation exchange capacity (CEC) was used for this purpose. For 320 soil samples of the Highveld Region, water content at a matrix potential of - 33 kPa, −1 500 kPa and the percentage water retained between −33 kPa and - 1500 kPa (ΔW), were compared with different parameters. The water retentivity of disturbed soils can be predicted more accurately if variations in CEC are taken into account. Highly significant multiple correlation coefficients of 0, 97, 0, 96 and 0, 91 respectively, were calculated for the relationships of CEC (me/100 g soil) and clay content with water content at −33 kPa and - 1 500 kPa and with ΔW. S. Afr. J. Plant Soil 1984, 1: 33–38

      Authors

      Lambooy, Astrid M.

      Year Published

      1984

      Publication

      South African Journal of Plant and Soil

      Locations
      DOI

      10.1080/02571862.1984.10634106

      This article contributed by:

      Original

      Soil factors affecting tree growth and root development in a citrus orchardNel, D. J.1984

      Soil factors affecting tree growth and root development in a citrus orchard

      Keywords

      Citrus, tree growth, root development, soil characteristics, porosity, air capacity

      Abstract

      Tree- and root-growth parameters correlated well with a number of soil properties Useful relationships were established between unconfined penetrometer resistance, air capacity (at FWC), tree growth and root development. Tree and root growth were also restricted in the soil where the long-term air-filled porosity was almost continuously less than 15%. S. Afr. J. Plant Soil 1984, 1: 39–47

      Authors

      Nel, D. J. and Bennie, A. T.P.

      Year Published

      1984

      Publication

      South African Journal of Plant and Soil

      Locations
      DOI

      10.1080/02571862.1984.10634107

      This article contributed by:

      Original

      Recent Articles

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